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Old 11-20-2013, 10:54 AM   #101
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Originally Posted by herk7769 View Post
Certainly!

In fact the wear patterns on my 5th wheel are pretty interesting.

I have been inflating all 4 tires to the same air pressure. However, I just got back from an 8,000 mile cross country trip and due to the angle of my 5th wheel when connected, the leading axle's tires are showing slightly OVER inflated wear while the trailing axle's tires are showing slightly UNDER inflated wear.

This spring I will be weighing each axle individually and setting the pressures by axle and not by the aggregate trailer weight (both axles summed together on the scale pad).

Thanks Herk, you were Right ON with your idea about the wear issues I'm experiencing. Load range C tires say 1640 max load in dual config. That's only #6560 total weight that can be carried by the 4 tires. Looking at the wear pattern and especially the wear on the tire under the slide says these tires should definitely be upgraded to load range D and inflated to #65.
Can't tell you how much your information and this forum in general has helped this first time owner. Will follow your suggestion and get a set of Marathon's for the next season.
Thanks again!
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Old 11-20-2013, 11:34 AM   #102
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Why would you ask if I still worked for Continental Tire?

After 38 years, I retired. Just prior to my retirement, we did not produce any ST tires, however, over the years we have. And they have been in production in some of the many plants I have visited or worked in over the years.

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Mike,

Do you still work for Continental Tire? I looked at their web page and they not only do not make an ST tire; they don't even make a true LT tire.

The closest tire with an actual load rating is for an SUV and they stress TRACTION not load carrying capability.

Continental USA Car / Light Truck / SUV -*CrossContact
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Old 11-20-2013, 01:26 PM   #103
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Why would you ask if I still worked for Continental Tire?

After 38 years, I retired. Just prior to my retirement, we did not produce any ST tires, however, over the years we have. And they have been in production in some of the many plants I have visited or worked in over the years.
The advice you were giving concerning the use of passenger type tires on trailers was so radical that I thought some investigation into your background was in order.

Were you in sales or engineering?
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Old 11-24-2013, 06:20 AM   #104
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Tireman has written about weighing each tire individually. Sometimes the front axle has significantly different loading.
After reading a thread about a fiver that was 1,000 lbs. heavier on the driver side, I think that would be the only way to go.
An LT tire is the only option to an ST, but you have to reduce the load capacity by 10% if using it as a trailer tire.
A pressure monitoring system would be a good idea, too.
The only tire that requires a 10% reduction of load capacity for use on the RV trailer axles is the Passenger tire. It can be used on trailers under 10,000# GVWR.

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Old 11-24-2013, 07:17 AM   #105
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Did I miss something? "LT tires are not designed for use on light trucks?"

Is there an LT class of trailer tire I am unaware of? But I do agree about not using ST tires on anything with a drivetrain.
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Old 11-24-2013, 07:38 AM   #106
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The question I have is....why do so many heavy trailer owners, with emphasis on HEAVY have had horrific failures with ST tires then after switching to LT's have had no further issues? On paper, ST tires prove a perfect match for those trailers, but after exhaustive searches not only this message board but others, apparently LT's have solved their problems time and time again. Why is that? Perhaps the LT tire converts are STILL having as many issues but are embarrassed to admit their waste of $$ ? I.....really don't think so. Not to dump on overseas rubber manufacturers, but if the ST's were made in the good ol' USA like many of their LT brethren, there would not be nearly as many ST incidents as we are hearing today. Just my .02.
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Old 11-24-2013, 08:05 AM   #107
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rattleNsmoke, I'm glad to read your post. I'm rather tired of being picked apart for expressing my opinion. To be specific, I believe, if you stay in the same load rating, PT and LT tires are generally much superior than ST tires. Additionally, I have no confidence in tires produced in the far east. I would again suggest anyone to cut a section on comparable load tire, buff the cut on a grinder and compare components, sidewall stiffness, the thickness of the tread, end counts of fabric and steel belts, etc. With those two sections in your hand, form your own opinion. Decide from that, which tire you want supporting your load.
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Old 11-24-2013, 08:48 AM   #108
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cut a section on comparable load tire
Therein lies the "rub." Finding one of these might take some time.

Many "heavy" campers come with LT tires not because they are better, only because they are cheaper than a similarly load rated ST tire. NONE come with "passenger tires" because they would never get them approved by DoT as "road legal".

OEMs are nothing if cost conscious...

Here is a quote from a Wildcat Representative on this Forum:

A note on the "Chinese made tires": currently, I'm not aware of an American made (USA or Canada) tire that is available to us for our specific tire requirements (ST235/80R16/E). It's a common complaint I hear, but I think there's a lot of misinformation out there as well. There are many US companies that offer their tire brands, but are not manufactured in the US. For instance, Maxxis tires, an RV trailer tire upgrade popular with many consumers, is currently manufactured in Thailand. Does that mean they're inferior? I don't think so -- and neither do many of their fans on this forum. However, judging tires simply by country of origin seems to be a common theme. I would challenge our customers to instead look at the attributes of the specific tires: Wildcat uses standard 16" LRE (Load Range 'E') 10-ply radial tires on custom aluminum wheels. Our current Provider brand tire is available at Discount Tire stores nationwide. Here's a bit more info about our wheels and tires from our supplier, HiSpec: Wheel University - HiSpec Wheel & Tire, Inc. - The Safety Wheel (Wheel University - HiSpec Wheel & Tire, Inc. - The Safety Wheel)

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Old 11-24-2013, 09:54 AM   #109
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A case in point, the rear of a front wheel drive vehicle is nothing more than a trailer. Those tires will see the same forces, wear and stress as those on a trailer. Why is it those passenger tires outlast trailer tires by tens of thousands of miles?
This analogy might work for a single axle trailer but I don't think it works for a multi-axle trailer. Sheer forces on turns are experienced that are not on any automobile that I know of.
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Old 11-24-2013, 04:35 PM   #110
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Originally Posted by rattleNsmoke View Post
The question I have is....why do so many heavy trailer owners, with emphasis on HEAVY have had horrific failures with ST tires then after switching to LT's have had no further issues? On paper, ST tires prove a perfect match for those trailers, but after exhaustive searches not only this message board but others, apparently LT's have solved their problems time and time again. Why is that? Perhaps the LT tire converts are STILL having as many issues but are embarrassed to admit their waste of $$ ? I.....really don't think so. Not to dump on overseas rubber manufacturers, but if the ST's were made in the good ol' USA like many of their LT brethren, there would not be nearly as many ST incidents as we are hearing today. Just my .02.
Most large, heavy, RV trailers can easily hold twice as much cargo weight than they are designed for. Add that factor to someone that's a little lackadaisical about their tire pressures and early tire failures are easy to predict.

Often owners with early ST tire failures will "plus size" with their replacement tires. When done properly a nice (extra amount) increase in tire load capacity reserve will be a byproduct of the replacement tire regardless of design.

When the upgrade is complete the pocketbook is lighter. The light bulb goes off and the owner's lackadaisical habits with trailer tires will diminish.

Better maintenance habits = less problems and longer tire lifespan.

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