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Old 09-06-2013, 08:38 PM   #71
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$125 per axle sounds steep but it may include having to weld or bend the axle to get things aligned. If not in spec see if you can get the alignment shop to put the cause in writing.
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Old 09-07-2013, 09:29 AM   #72
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Oh well I was thinking about giving up drinking anyway.
Woe, lets not go off the deep end! we all need our coping devices.
Maybe you could convince the wife to skip that next shoe sale.
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Old 09-09-2013, 08:25 AM   #73
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$125 per axle sounds steep but it may include having to weld or bend the axle to get things aligned. If not in spec see if you can get the alignment shop to put the cause in writing.
I'm thinking of taking the TT to a tire shop a good friend runs, just to see if he thinks it's alignment or possibly something else. It's a no cost look see and objective since his shop can't do trailers anyway. Just because I've done a couple of "caveman" checks with a straight edge and I can't see anything really out of line. Plus the alignment guy is an 8 to 5 shop and not really convenient at 50 miles from the house. Might save a couple of hundred bucks. Might just be a delay tactic and wishful thinking
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Old 10-14-2013, 03:10 AM   #74
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Just a couple of comments. I don't want to step on Tireman9's toes. At least not too hard.

Carlisle tires have been building the special trailer (ST) about as long as any other manufacturer and have been one of the largest OEM suppliers for many years. At least until Goodyear decided to make ST tires.

Most of the data and specification information on the internet about ST tires can be traced back to Carlisle. Discount Tire has been a long time retailer of Carlisle Tires and have posted numerous information about ST tires from the pages of Carlisle's trailer tire data books.

The very first post that started this thread is about 90% - 100% from Carlisle. The reference I'm posting below is directly from Carlisle's new web site and is listed as download #2.

For a long time Carlisle had a 60 MPH speed restriction right in their ST tire warranty along with a statement about always using the maximum amount of air pressure as indicated on the individual tire's sidewalls. It's no longer in their warranty per say but is clearly not recommended to drive over 60 MPH with their ST tires. It's good reading if you use ST tires.


http://www.carlisletransportationproducts.com/cms_files/original/Trailer_Tires__Tips_Best_Practices.pdf

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Old 10-15-2013, 06:54 AM   #75
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Thanks for the link. I'll add it to my library of info.
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Old 11-03-2013, 04:48 PM   #76
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I bought Maxmiler load range E and was told they wer made in USA
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Old 11-03-2013, 05:10 PM   #77
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Does buying an E-rated tire (instead of a C) give you a stronger, and thus safer, tire? It is the air pressure not the tire that carries the load so the answer is NO

Please explain the reasoning behind this.
How can that be? That implies that merely inflating a C to 65# would carry the load of an E rated tire. Makes no sense to me.

If an E rated tire is not stronger than a C at the same pressure, why are there different load rated tires?
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Old 11-04-2013, 08:34 AM   #78
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I bought Maxmiler load range E and was told they wer made in USA
Tires should have "Made in xxxxx" molded on the sidewall. If you provide the DOT serial we can tell you the location of the plant that made them.
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Old 11-04-2013, 08:46 AM   #79
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Does buying an E-rated tire (instead of a C) give you a stronger, and thus safer, tire? It is the air pressure not the tire that carries the load so the answer is NO

Please explain the reasoning behind this.
How can that be? That implies that merely inflating a C to 65# would carry the load of an E rated tire. Makes no sense to me.

If an E rated tire is not stronger than a C at the same pressure, why are there different load rated tires?
It is the air pressure in the tire (balloon) that transmits the load from the road surface to the wheel.

The "strength" or Load Range of a tire is its ability to hold the pressure. Decades ago there were "ranges" established to replace the old term "Ply Rating" The more plys of cotton (ply material way back when) the more pressure the tire could hold. The more pressure in a tire the more load it can support. To avoid confusion, discrete increments were established so competing tire companies would not be claiming "my tire is stronger because it carries more at 62 than your tire does at 61psi.

A review of Load Inflation tables will show that a LR-C and LR-D and LR-E are rated to carry the same load when inflated to the same pressure.
I did a post on my blog Oct 15 just on this topic with s special pressure plot from a test lab showing that is is not the sidewalls that carry the load.
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Old 11-04-2013, 09:06 AM   #80
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I think we all are aware that higher pressures require higher strength tires, thus the different load range tires.
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