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Old 01-12-2019, 03:45 PM   #1
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Tire E versus D rating question?

Hi all,
I am sure this question has been answered like a million times here but even performing a search and reading some posts with similar sounding titles I donít think I have gotten the answer I am looking for.
Our 2016 28-foot Sabre Lite lists the tires as ST225/75R15/D. We are looking to replace the tires but almost every dealer we talk to carries only ST225/75R15/E for our specs. I have read on some other forums that stepping up from D to E is fine as long as the tires are the same size, but I notice that the psi jumps from 65 to 80 between D to E. My question is should I be concerned about installing a set of E rated tires that our wheels/axles will not be able to handle the increased pressure? If yes is there a way to check whether they can?

Discount Tires is also really into suggesting their in-house Hartland brand. Secondary question: are they good? Specs seem comprable to Goodyear but they seem like they have very few reviews online.

Thanks in advance!
Paul & Ashley
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Old 01-12-2019, 04:13 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by HoppinTheMap View Post
[...] My question is should I be concerned about installing a set of E rated tires that our wheels/axles will not be able to handle the increased pressure? [...]
Your axles won't care about pressure in tires, so scratch that off your list of worries. Wheels are rated to certain pressures. However, I've never seen a wheel rated to a pressure lower than the 80 psi limit of E-rated tires. Generally, pressure ratings of wheels is only relevant with pressure in the 100s of psi.

Going from D to E is a good move. At worst, it does no harm. At best, you get a stiffer, more capable tire.

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Originally Posted by HoppinTheMap View Post
[...]Discount Tires is also really into suggesting their in-house Hartland brand. Secondary question: are they good? Specs seem comprable to Goodyear but they seem like they have very few reviews online.[...]
Tire quality is a hot button topic around here. You could spend the rest of the weekend doing nothing but reading about ST tire quality. Search "china bomb."

When I change my tires, it will be to the USA-made Goodyear Endurance tires. Maxxis has also had a fairly strong brand profile around here, regarding quality. I used Carlisle on my popup. But, Goodyear or a US-make equivalent will be my option when I get new tires.

Good luck.
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Old 01-12-2019, 04:15 PM   #3
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Thank you so much for the quick response!!
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Old 01-12-2019, 04:18 PM   #4
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I would absolutely recommend that you go up at least one weight rating whenever you replace trailer tires. Usually wheels have a stamped psi rating somewhere on them (possible near the hub, sometimes on the back side). But I would not be concerned that they could not handle the increased psi, 80 psi is not all that much and I have never seen a trailer wheel on a rig your size that wouldn't safely carry that much pressure. Trailer manufacturers put the cheapest tire they possibly can on them to save $$, so the very first upgrade anyone should consider is better and higher rated tires.
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Old 01-12-2019, 04:31 PM   #5
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Here is a picture of why tire quality is important. In this case, this wasn't due to poor quality, necessarily. This was due to me running a tire that was 7 or 8 years old and, I think, had been run underinflated by the previous owner. I also hit a major pothole in the freeway that did the damage.

Anyway, I should have changed this out 2 years earlier when I first bought the trailer. I didn't. What happened was that I lost that patch of tread, I drove at 60 mph this way for over 50 miles (unbeknownst), then pulled over and changed it.

What could have happened is that the entire tread could have separated (unwound) and whipped around inside my wheel well. This would have destroyed my side panel and cost $1,000s in damage. Or, it could have blown and I could have lost control of the trailer.

But this is why people change tires. They don't want these types of failures out on the road.
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Old 01-12-2019, 05:13 PM   #6
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I went from 225/75/15-D to the same size E tires last spring.

I could feel the difference immediately the much better ride with the heavier duty tires.

I went with Hercules tires...got around 5000 miles on them and so far, so good!

Raised my 5'ver one inch, which saved me from having to lower my hitch as I was a little high in front on my 5'ver when hitched.
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Old 01-12-2019, 07:19 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HoppinTheMap View Post
Hi all,
I am sure this question has been answered like a million times here but even performing a search and reading some posts with similar sounding titles I donít think I have gotten the answer I am looking for.
Our 2016 28-foot Sabre Lite lists the tires as ST225/75R15/D. We are looking to replace the tires but almost every dealer we talk to carries only ST225/75R15/E for our specs. I have read on some other forums that stepping up from D to E is fine as long as the tires are the same size, but I notice that the psi jumps from 65 to 80 between D to E. My question is should I be concerned about installing a set of E rated tires that our wheels/axles will not be able to handle the increased pressure? If yes is there a way to check whether they can?

Discount Tires is also really into suggesting their in-house Hartland brand. Secondary question: are they good? Specs seem comprable to Goodyear but they seem like they have very few reviews online.

Thanks in advance!
Paul & Ashley
Going from a load range D to a load range E is pretty much what everyone does because it increases the max load that your trailer can carry. That is also why load range D tires are hard to find. The RV manufacturers put the lowest load range tire that they can on their RV's and sometimes that isn't even as much as the GVW of the RV. My TT has load range C tires on it and I'm going to replace them with load range D when I replace them.

I've never heard of the Heartland brand so I can't answer that question. The majority of people here are replacing their tires with Goodyear Endurance tires because they are made in the USA. So far the reviews have been good on them.
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Old 01-12-2019, 07:31 PM   #8
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Going from a load range D to a load range E is pretty much what everyone does because it increases the max load that your trailer can carry. [...]
No. Definitely not. The max load your trailer can carry is based on the frame, axles, and some other things. This weight is clearly listed on your ratings sticker you'll find on your trailer. Increasing tire load ratings does not increase the max load your trailer can carry. Your trailer's weight ratings do not change as you increase your tires' load ratings.

Good luck.
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Old 01-12-2019, 07:45 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by russhd1997 View Post

Going from a load range D to a load range E is pretty much what everyone does because it increases the max load that your trailer can carry.
What you really meant to say was that going to E-rated tires from D tires will carry the weight of the trailer better...

E-rated tires will not give the trailer more weight carrying capability.

The reason for this is that the RV makers put just enough tire to barely carry the load that the trailer and axles are rated for without giving any extra safety margin for tire strength.
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Old 01-12-2019, 07:56 PM   #10
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Good move to go from D to E tires of the same size. Yes your rims will handle the extra PSI 80# no problem.

Goodyear Endurance have been only out now about 2 years, but many have extolled their virtues including me... 5 years worth of usage will give a better picture of overall performance but so far so good.

Look online at Goodyear dot com as they sometimes advertise specials on those particular tires. You can order online and have them delivered to any goodyear dealer to have them fitted. YOU WILL NEED metal valve stems installed if your do not already have them on your rims. Usually about $4 a rim...

Many keep there old hardly used tires and sell them on craigslist for a few $$$.
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