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Old 04-08-2016, 04:48 PM   #1
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Tire help

I have a 2015 Rockwood 2608 ws which came with 14" Legancy tires (c rated). After a number of trips including a14k trip from Fl to Seattle and back, no problems. BTW I use a TPMS. Finding D rated tire from a reputable name like Goodyear or MAXXIS is impossible. So preparing for another long trip over the Rockies this summer, I found "Centura" in a D rating. Of course never heard of them and certain made in China. So dilemma is pick up 2 more plys with this no-name brand or go with the C rated known brands above. This tire thing is such a pain. Seems like no matter which way you go reliable tires are next to impossible to find. Any thoughts?
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Old 04-08-2016, 04:54 PM   #2
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I have a 2015 Rockwood 2608 ws which came with 14" Legancy tires (c rated). After a number of trips including a14k trip from Fl to Seattle and back, no problems. BTW I use a TPMS. Finding D rated tire from a reputable name like Goodyear or MAXXIS is impossible. So preparing for another long trip over the Rockies this summer, I found "Centura" in a D rating. Of course never heard of them and certain made in China. So dilemma is pick up 2 more plys with this no-name brand or go with the C rated known brands above. This tire thing is such a pain. Seems like no matter which way you go reliable tires are next to impossible to find. Any thoughts?

You left off the most important info. Your actual load on your tires. Too often the tires are the weakest link and for a majority of RVs owners are unknowingly overloading one or more tire.

So you need to replace your tires with tires capable of supporting equal or greater load.
There are come "commercial" grade tires made in Europe that you might consider but again you must find tires that have sufficient load capacity.
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Old 04-08-2016, 04:55 PM   #3
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I think that most of the tire problems are due to running a tire very close or over its max capacity. So from the limited info in your posting I think the higher load range tire is a good idea. I have had two good year marathons fail this year already. But in my case they were load range E tires running a couple of hundred pounds below their rated max capacity.
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Old 04-08-2016, 05:13 PM   #4
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Any thoughts?
I went with Kumho 857's. They are a euro-metric size, but they are available in 14" LR D and have a pretty good reputation from what I found online. They are sold in the US as an ST for trailer service. Replaced my 2 year old junk last year - which from a blowout and nail had evolved into 3 different brands between the 5 tires.

So far so good with the Kumho's. Also bought a TST TPMS, as when one of the OEM tires blew, I never felt it and couldn't see it.

The 195 was the best fit for our trailer - the aspect ratios are different, so I didn't want a bigger diameter since the tires were already pretty close together. Since I wasn't trying to increase the load carrying capacity - just wanted a heavier / better quality tire, I still inflate them to 50 psi because the trailer seems to ride really well at that pressure. Opinions on that vary - so you can also go to 65 psi with the LR D's.
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Old 04-08-2016, 05:50 PM   #5
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TT fully loaded is about 7000#. I've weighed if several times. I know I'm under the max rating but I don't have the exact number at my fingertips. I know it's not scientific, but when I see that 30" trailer with those small 14" tires, it spooks me.
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Old 04-10-2016, 12:21 AM   #6
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TT fully loaded is about 7000#. I've weighed if several times. I know I'm under the max rating but I don't have the exact number at my fingertips. I know it's not scientific, but when I see that 30" trailer with those small 14" tires, it spooks me.
7000#, is that total trailer weight? If so, some of it transfers to the tow vehicle, probably about 800#/900#.

If the 7000# is on your axles they are probably overloaded. According to your specs the axles are somewhere around 3300# - 3500# GAWR each.

I donít think youíll find any LRD 14Ē tires with much load capacity reserves unless you look for European designed commercial tires such the Kuhmo brand.

http://www.kumhousa.com/tire/category/truck-suv/7EAB87AD-62DC-4D82-897E-E59335DE416C
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