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Old 02-13-2013, 04:46 PM   #11
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I getting the impression c rated tires re not very forgiving on weight, pressure, or towing speed
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Old 02-14-2013, 04:22 AM   #12
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lbrjet Do not put more than 50lbs in C rated tires when towing.

What I was writing is that you may even put 60psi in a C rated tire of psi50.
On a C- rated tire the YYY in "maximum load xxxx lbs AT YYY psi ( cold) " is not the maximum pressure of the tire , as is written on P-tires and XL tires.
Even the American TRA allows 10 psi extra for higher speed and beter driving conditions. Thoug they only support higher maximum load ( xxxx in Example), for verry low speed, unofficially it would keep the tires undamaged when higher load.

@ Ditchhooker
Your tires probably got damaged by overloading , because 3 of 4 damaged , probably the 4th is also damaged but you cant see it yet.
If you now would highen up the pressure on the already damaged tires, they would blow up and you would blame the higher pressure.
For the new tires , if you stay at C-load/6ply , begin with 60 psi, or better weigh and discover that the tires or one side was overloaded for the tires all the time.
This link leads to a pdf of goodyear with at the bottom of page 1 "inflation limitations" , for truck tires even 20 psi above AT yyypsi is allowed.
http://www.goodyear.com/truck/pdf/edb_loads.pdf
also at page 2 the higher maximum load when more yyy at verry low speed.
So even with The original C-load Ditchhooker most likely ( but weigh first) can keep his tires undamaged.
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Old 02-14-2013, 11:00 AM   #13
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That's why I said "when towing". When towing the tire pressure will rise after heat is generated and that is where the cushion of "extra 10lbs" is utilized. Putting in 60 is asking for trouble, but please go right ahead if you wish.
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Old 02-15-2013, 01:38 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jadatis View Post
@ Ditchhooker
Your tires probably got damaged by overloading , because 3 of 4 damaged , probably the 4th is also damaged but you cant see it yet.
I doubt I have overloaded them, 3000 front axle, 3100 rear axle when loaded, the 2 on the slide side are the ones that are both damaged which is the heavy side regardless. never been below max pressure (always 50psi). Seldomly go over 65 mph, generally tow @ 62 mph (speed limit is usually 70 mph), however I have not scaled that specific side yet.

unfortunately I currently have a 14" ST tire on the trailer (Greenball Towmasters) and no where close to LT rated like in the article. I suspect just being close to the max load of the tires combined with some hot weather and the steady running at near the max speed for the tires is what has done it. The load range increase (possible size as well) is more for my peace of mind, as the DW on occation will hook up and go without me for a weekend with the girls from time to time.
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Old 02-15-2013, 06:43 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ditchooker View Post
The load range increase (possible size as well) is more for my peace of mind, as the DW on occation will hook up and go without me for a weekend with the girls from time to time.
If you are uncomfortable with the load range on your current ST tire, I would definitely recommend going up ONE Load Range. I do not recommend changing tire size due to the issue of impact with the wheel well or other tire if the suspension should be stressed (load or impact from road hazard).
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Old 02-15-2013, 10:58 PM   #16
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Staying with the factory size would be ideal, however, Finding a 14" tire in load range D, is much more difficult, and looks to be non existant in Canada, whereas the 15" tires are much easier to find.
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Old 02-21-2013, 05:03 AM   #17
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@ Ditchhooker

What I have gotten out of your reactions is next.
GVWR 7700 lbs.
2 axles 4 tires on the road when driving.
Now having ST ( special trailer) tires with C-load ( maxloadpressure 50 psi)
14 inch rimms.
Probably weightdifference R/L because of the slide on one side.

What I am missing are the exact sises of the tire and the loadindex or maximum load. When you give those , I can put it in my chanced calculator that can be found in the map.
https://skydrive.live.com/?id=A526E0...6e0eee092e6dc&
So you can also play with it yourselves.
I included the tow-barr weight in the pressurecalculation now , so if you take another towbarr weight the needed pressure is also chanching now.
But now the beginning Bumping and Damage border are the same .
Can make a picture of it again and place it here as example.

The ST tires are calculated in their maximum load , for a lower speed , so the tire may deflect more before it gets damaged , and that gives a higher maximum load then a normal road tire or LT with the same sises.
This brings them more to the edges of possible Damage.
By putting from the beginning at an still undamaged tire, the 10 psi extra, wich is supported by the TRA for higher speed then 65m/h, the deflection gets less and so tire-damage does not appear that soon.
But I thougt there where enaugh LT tires in 14 inch , example 185R14 with D-load so 65 psi and loadindex 102 so 850kg/1874lbs times 4 makes 7500 lbs.
Must be enaugh if you substract the tongeweight of 10%.
And then even you could add the 10 psi for extra savety .
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Old 02-21-2013, 07:56 AM   #18
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You will need to find the load information for your model tires.
Here is one from Maxxis that you can use for a "guide" if you can't find the exact one for your model and brand.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf maxxis 8008load.pdf (142.2 KB, 27 views)
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Old 02-21-2013, 08:20 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by herk7769 View Post
You will need to find the load information for your model tires.
Here is one from Maxxis that you can use for a "guide" if you can't find the exact one for your model and brand.
Looked at this list, and saw what is done wrong in America also here.
The B-,C-,D-,E-load tires with the same sises are placed in the same list.
A stiffer tire ( E stiffer then C) needs a higher pressure for the same load.
Or the other way around has lower loadcapacity for the same pressure.
So for every load-letter a different list should be made, and this is common use in Europe. I dare to say that the American used way is wrong, and leads to more deflection then the tire can savely stand at lower loads.
havent checked it , but probably calculated with the wrong power in the formula too.

So better yust look at the sidewall of the tires , look for "maximum load xxxx lbs AT yyy psi ( cold) " or the loadindex mostly directly after the sises.
185/80 R14 102/100 Q for instance , then 102 stands for single use 850kg/1865 lbs? and the 100 li stands for 800kg/1760 lbs for dual load.
Q is then the speedcode and stands for up to 160km/99m/h maximum speed.
N is up to 140km/85m?/h.
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Old 02-21-2013, 08:38 AM   #20
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Peter,

While I don't doubt what you are saying for a minute, I would like to see the source link (preferrably a site in english) that explains why the commonly in use load/pressure charts are not correct.

I totally get that a E series tire with 10 PSI in it won't support much more than its own weight, but I would like to see a source for why you feel that the manufacturer supplied charts for their tire size, load, and required pressure do not accurately reflect reality.
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