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Old 04-19-2015, 02:16 PM   #1
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Tire sidewall safe temperature?

I don't have a TPMS and am unlikely to get one, but I did buy an IR thermometer. I plan to use it to monitor tire sidewall temps, among other things. What's the safe upper limit?

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Old 04-19-2015, 02:37 PM   #2
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I don't have a TPMS and am unlikely to get one, but I did buy an IR thermometer. I plan to use it to monitor tire sidewall temps, among other things. What's the safe upper limit?

Thanks
Most blow outs happen at 175 or higher, thats the air temp inside, now saying that your tire sidewall might be hotter. I use to just shoot my TV tires and hubs and if I was with in 10 degrees I felt safe to go on. If you shoot your tires and one is really off you have a dragging break. When I went to a rest stop I always shot the person next to me to just to see what they were running. Nobody ever said anything to me about it. people didn't care. But get one that just pulls in before it cools. I even shot trucker tires for the fun of it.
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Old 04-19-2015, 02:41 PM   #3
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According to TST TPMS manual:#6: Also, we recommend you leave the temperature set at 157" Fahrenheit; tires typically fail between 190-2000 Fahrenheit.
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Old 04-19-2015, 02:59 PM   #4
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When I went to a rest stop I always shot the person next to me to just to see what they were running.
Good idea. That normalizes for ambient temperatures.

Thanks for the help.
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Old 04-19-2015, 03:15 PM   #5
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Can't say that I'd agree with your strategy...static temperature readings with a IR gun when you're stopped vs dynamic readings of temperature and pressure that most TPMS provide while under way. There's no question in my mind which option reduces the 'pucker' factor when towing.


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Old 04-19-2015, 03:40 PM   #6
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... If you shoot your tires and one is really off you have a dragging break. When I went to a rest stop I always shot the person next to me to just to see what they were running. Nobody ever said anything to me about it. people didn't care. But get one that just pulls in before it cools. I even shot trucker tires for the fun of it.
A dragging brake will elevate the hub temperature as will a bearing going bad, but I doubt very much if either will elevate the tire temperature enough to cause an alarm.
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Old 04-19-2015, 09:14 PM   #7
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A dragging brake will elevate the hub temperature as will a bearing going bad, but I doubt very much if either will elevate the tire temperature enough to cause an alarm.
When I shoot the tire I also shoot the hub. The hub will show if a brake is dragging it has to be hotter then the others. I thought people would grasp what I was doing. Saying tire to me is the tire assy. which to me includes the hub as well, Surprisingly enough I'm always with in 10 degrees of my TV. I also have the 507 system installed to give me the internal temps, and pressure. But since I bought the gun, it is better then me reaching down and feeling the hub. The sunny side is always about 5 to 7 degrees warmer depending on which side the sun is hitting. I also shoot the black top just for the fun of it. It stops me from being bored waiting for wife to walk the dog. When someone pulls in next to me as I explained I'll shoot there's to for the point of curiosity. If I have a wheel assy. that is reading 20 or30 degrees more then the other 3, common sense will say something is wrong with that wheel. Just something I got in a habit of doing. I have asked tire people and Mike at the company that made the sensor system and nobody can tell me what a tire outside temp of the rubber should run. Can someone tell me what the outside of the tire rubber should be at 90 degrees ambient air? It just makes me feel safer false or not. If you have a IR gun try it, it will not read 90 degrees.
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Old 04-19-2015, 09:32 PM   #8
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I always shoot the tires and hubs on the truck and trailer when ever we stop,within 2 minutes of stopping. I never see over 125 on any tires,usually 115 or so. Hubs are a little hotter,125 or so,but after the brakes cool from stopping from60 mph,they cool down to 115-120. If there is a difference of 5 deg between anything I stop more often and want to know why.
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Old 04-19-2015, 09:48 PM   #9
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Way before electronics told me any temperatures, when towing, I would stop, get out, feel the tires and the hubs. Any tire or hub that was hotter than any other would make me pause to think about a cause. Was the sun shining on that side? Is the tire pressure off? Are the bearings going out? Then feel the sidewalls on your TV and compare (using your finger tips) those temps with the trailer. Always do this within the first 40 miles, and certainly within the first 20 miles of any interstate driving.

Heat buildup while towing is all related to the outside air temp, the highway pavement type, and other factors. Feeling for the HIGHER temp on any one wheel will give you a clue that something might be wrong. How HOT that temp is should give you an indication HOW bad the problem is and whether you should continue. Never should anything be so hot as to be terribly uncomfortable to the touch.

The way I go now is to use the electronic point and shoot temp sensor. I also try to shoot the brake drum behind the tires. On a two axle TT, I consistently have one drum that is 15-20 degrees hotter then the others... which tells me I have to take off the drum and figure out why that brake drum is dragging, or is it tighter than the others providing more braking? I would have looked at it before now, but I did not feel it was a severe problem so I kept on coming up from FL in March so I could do the work at home.
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Old 04-19-2015, 09:52 PM   #10
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[QUOTE=rsdata;840225]Way before electronics told me any temperatures, when towing, I would stop, get out, feel the tires and the hubs. Any tire or hub that was hotter than any other would make me pause to think about a cause. Was the sun shining on that side? Is the tire pressure off? Are the bearings going out? Then feel the sidewalls on your TV and compare (using your finger tips) those temps with the trailer. Always do this within the first 40 miles, and certainly within the first 20 miles of any interstate driving.

I used to do it that way,but Ive had my IR for almost 20 yrs and its spoiled me!
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