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Old 04-24-2014, 07:13 PM   #31
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Her's what Michelin says ........

"A tire in operation will heat up until it reaches its equilibrium temperature where the heat being generated equals the heat being dissipated.
The temperature of the tire will increase with an increase in ambient temperature. There is nothing to worry about in the ranges stated (120-125), if the temperature gets above 250 degrees F then I would be concerned !"
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Old 04-24-2014, 07:40 PM   #32
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From page 2 of TST manual: "Truck System Technologies"
What should I set my parameters at?... As for temperature, the monitors are preset at 157 F, a safe setting for all tires, which typically fail between 180-200 F.
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Old 04-24-2014, 09:58 PM   #33
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X2 AcadianBob & OldCoot - we just took our rig on a all-interstate trip to South GA 2 weeks ago - ambient temps were in the mid 70s and i do not recall my TST TPMS 270 ever registering temps over 80 deg

Edit: I wonder how high temps would go if, for example, you were driving I-10 through AZ in July with ambient temps @110 deg?
We were in Gorman CA. last year on July 13. I know it was stinking hot (I found temps for the area last year were around 100 F. I just happened to take some pictures!
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Old 04-25-2014, 12:21 PM   #34
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The Michelin response was a bit puzzling to me - Anything over 200 would seem dangerous. None the less under-inflation, speed and ambient temperature are the biggest factors in tire temps.
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Old 04-25-2014, 08:32 PM   #35
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If your tires hit 250 and are still holding air I would be very surprised.
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Old 04-25-2014, 08:37 PM   #36
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If your tires hit 250 and are still holding air I would be very surprised.
I would be surprised if they survived at 180D.
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Old 04-27-2014, 10:58 PM   #37
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Some good info here plus some confusion about the reality of tire performance. In my test of 5/19/12 a temperature difference of 20F was noted between the TPMS which is on the end of a metal stem that is cooled by moving in ambient.
The hot spot is buried deep in the tire structure at the belt edges and this can only be measured accurately with a needle probe.
IR guns read tire surface temperature which can vary by 10 to 30F over a distance as small as 1/4" so a reading from an IR gun is more of an average temperature over a circular area that is sometimes 1" diameter.

TPMS are primarily a pressure sensor designed to give the driver a warning when a certain amount of pressure is lost. Some only warn when the pressure drops 15% below the cold pressure set point while others also warn with a certain number of psi loss from the hot pressure.

I agree with those that don't pay much attention to the temperature except when the alarm goes off. This is most likely a bearing or brake issue. My TPMS displays pressure & temp but I really only pay attention to the pressure and the temperature is just some extra numbers that go up and down over a relatively small range.

Finally the temperature that you are reading relative to ambient can be anywhere from 10 to 60 degrees above ambient with things such a tread depth, actual load, inflation, moisture content in the inflation gas, free air clearance around the tire, length and material of valve stem etc. all having an effect.
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Old 04-27-2014, 11:13 PM   #38
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We were in Gorman CA. last year on July 13. I know it was stinking hot (I found temps for the area last year were around 100 F. I just happened to take some pictures!
Wow 132 is pretty warm! I'm like others and would get concerned if it got 20-30 hotter!
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Old 04-27-2014, 11:16 PM   #39
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[QUOTE=Tireman9;598100...I agree with those that don't pay much attention to the temperature except when the alarm goes off. This is most likely a bearing or brake issue. My TPMS displays pressure & temp but I really only pay attention to the pressure and the temperature is just some extra numbers that go up and down over a relatively small range...[/QUOTE]

When my temperature alarm went off it was sure not a bearing or brake issue as the trailer has now traveled over 9,800 miles since it went off. The alarm was set too close to ambient due to me being overly cautious. I have since set it 5 degrees higher and have towed in much higher ambient temps without it going off. I think anyone who ignores the temperature alarm however inaccurate you claim they are will be courting a blowout, tire disintegration, burnt bearing or brakes. Whatever the cause of the temperature rise, I would rather have it than not and will continue to monitor. I really doubt if the temperature will read on the monitor in time to keep the bearing from disintegrating before it is detected.
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Old 04-28-2014, 10:04 AM   #40
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When my temperature alarm went off it was sure not a bearing or brake issue as the trailer has now traveled over 9,800 miles since it went off. The alarm was set too close to ambient due to me being overly cautious. I have since set it 5 degrees higher and have towed in much higher ambient temps without it going off. I think anyone who ignores the temperature alarm however inaccurate you claim they are will be courting a blowout, tire disintegration, burnt bearing or brakes. Whatever the cause of the temperature rise, I would rather have it than not and will continue to monitor. I really doubt if the temperature will read on the monitor in time to keep the bearing from disintegrating before it is detected.
I'm a bit confused. You say your only experience from a High Temp warning was due to your setting the level too low. How is this a statement that supports using the temp warning as an early warning of a tire failure?

"Blowouts" and the sidewall disintegration are a direct result of excess heat generation internal to the tire sidewall body cord due to extreme flexing that comes from air leaking out of the tire and having lost 20% to 60% of your air.
In my experience as a tire engineer, the low pressure warning will always precede a high temperature warning if we are talking about sidewall flex failure.

If you want to be conservative on any setting it should be the low pressure setting. You should be able to set the warning at cold pressure -10% rather than -15% by simply setting the TPMS "Set Pressure" 5% higher than your goal. An alternative is to ensure the Fast leak and Rapid leak warning levels, that warn of pressure loss from the Hot running pressure, are also set properly.

We do agree that the Temp warning is probably useless for warning of bearing failure but I think a stuck and dragging brake might raise the contained air temperature to give a warning that something was wrong and a potential of giving some warning is better than no warning at all.
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