Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-11-2013, 10:09 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,258
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldCoot View Post
The torsion axles on trailers have the benefit of being as close to independent suspension as possible, whereas the spring suspension does not as the wheel that encounters a bump automatically transfers some load to the other wheel via the center walking beam.

Well, that is simply, and completely, wrong.
The loads on the axles of a tandem spring suspension are always equal, load is not transferred from one axle to the other.
Odd mistake for a mechanical engineer to make!
__________________

__________________
bakken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2013, 10:13 AM   #22
Mod free 5er
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Concord, NC
Posts: 24,215
Quote:
Originally Posted by bakken View Post
Well, that is simply, and completely, wrong.
The loads on the axles of a tandem spring suspension are always equal.
Odd mistake for a mechanical engineer to make!
No mistake, fact. That's what the walking beam is designed to do is transfer load.
__________________

__________________
OldCoot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2013, 10:18 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,258
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldCoot View Post
No mistake, fact. That's what the walking beam is designed to do is transfer load.
Nope, it is to share the load, not transfer it.
Simple mechanics 101.
__________________
bakken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2013, 10:20 AM   #24
Moderator Emeritus
 
Dave_Monica's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,329
Bakken and Old Coot, can we stay on topic which is torsion suspensions!

Dave
__________________


Nights camped in 2013 - 55, 2014 - 105, 2015 - 63
Dave_Monica is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2013, 10:28 AM   #25
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave_Monica View Post
Bakken and Old Coot, can we stay on topic which is torsion suspensions!

Dave
Yes, indeed.
Not sure how this spring debate got injected into the discussion.
Back to my problem, I have given some thought to putting a shim under the rear of the axle mount, on the "lazy" end, which would drop that tire down to the same level as the other, thus hopefully equalizing the loads.
That would be the inverse of what happened when the camper was new, when the front of the mount slipped down, allowing the tire to rotate up and overload the other tire.
I have never been a real fan of this setup.
__________________
bakken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2013, 10:33 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,258
And I guess that is an answer to dcheatwood, in that one can "adjust" the torsion axles, if you are willing to put shims in between the mounts and the camper frame. But that is far from the ideal answer, as you wouldn't want to just stick a washer in one end. The mounts are not all that strong, as we witnessed on another thread where the bolts ripped right through the axle mounting flange.
__________________
bakken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2013, 10:40 AM   #27
Moderator Emeritus
 
Dave_Monica's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,329
Quote:
Originally Posted by bakken View Post
I have given some thought to putting a shim under the rear of the axle mount, on the "lazy" end, which would drop that tire down to the same level as the other, thus hopefully equalizing the loads.
Why not talk to Al-Ko about the problem and get some input from them.

Dave
__________________


Nights camped in 2013 - 55, 2014 - 105, 2015 - 63
Dave_Monica is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2013, 10:47 AM   #28
daydreaming about camping
 
jeeplj8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: KC area
Posts: 1,400
when it comes to droop, what is the limiting factor? In a leaf spring suspension the limit is the physical travel of the spring shackle when the spring is un-sprung. As spring rates are not usually held at a constant over time, leaf springs will have different droop because the physical spring will deform.

On these trailer torsion axles, is the rubber bushing the physical limit of droop, or can the axle rotate down until metal contacts metal? My guess is that is the bushing.

In that case I would expect there is enough manufacture tolerance in bushing shape and size that you could get different droop. though 1 inch of travel seems like a lot.
__________________

2013 Coachmen Freedom Express 320BHDS pulled by a 2005 F250 King Ranch CC

A rainy day camping is better than a sunny day at work.
jeeplj8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2013, 10:49 AM   #29
Site Team
 
dcheatwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 3,380
Item 3 in the attached list from alko sort of implies that there is some adjustable aspects to the torsion axle

Click image for larger version

Name:	ForumRunner_20130711_094813.jpg
Views:	97
Size:	48.8 KB
ID:	35077

. But this is way over my head. I just tow em. :-)
__________________
2013 Rockwood 8282WS
Reese Revolution Pin, Reese 16K
2008 Tundra Limited Double Cab 5.7L
Air Lift 5000 w/Wireless Air

dcheatwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2013, 10:54 AM   #30
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave_Monica View Post
Why not talk to Al-Ko about the problem and get some input from them.

Dave
That would probably cause even more frustration!
__________________

__________________
bakken is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:48 PM.