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Old 12-16-2015, 03:51 PM   #11
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I have the same issue with a 2016 Flagstaff 27rlws and a gross weight of 7700 lbs and heavy on the back with slides on both sides and therefore light on the tongue. To complicate things they are 14 inch tires with no room between the axles to go to a 15 inch. The photo is not mine but the same.
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Old 12-16-2015, 04:18 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by DickiedooFlagman View Post
FR figures 10% of the GVWR on the trailer tongue, which brings you down to just under 7,000# with 90% on the tires, and now the tires are not overloaded. Many of us have replaced our original tires moving up a load range: using LRD instead of LRC for instance.


All RV trailers are built to minimum safety standards outlined in various NHTSA regulations and safety standards and in the FMVSS.

Once the trailer is built the manufacturer must certify the following items; GVWR, GAWR, tire and rim sizes appropriate for each GAWR, recommended cold inflation pressures for those tires, cargo capacity, and, establish a hitch/pin weight for publication in brochures and the vehicle owner manual. That's why - earlier post - I asked the OP to check his certification label. Sometimes manufacturer specs shown in their on-line PDF files don't match-up with the certificating label on the actual trailer.

The hitch/pin weight can be a range or specific figure. If a range the lowest value must be used. If a specific figure, it must be used. When added to the trailer’s total GAWR the sum must equal or exceed the trailer’s GVWR. After first sale the vehicle owner is totally responsible for hitch/pin weights.

If the maximum load capacity of the certified tires fitted to a trailer axle do not equal or exceed the axle’s established GAWR they are in violation of the minimum FMVSS. Trailer manufacturers are subject to severe monetary penalties and recall action for such fitments.
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Old 12-16-2015, 04:49 PM   #13
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Tires

I have the same unit, so the consensus is to upgrade to E rated tires?
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Old 12-16-2015, 04:58 PM   #14
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I have the same unit, so the consensus is to upgrade to E rated tires?
I stand to be corrected but I don't believe that the 14's are available in an e load range. Only a D. But then the axles are only rated for 3500 lbs each anyway. I will likely just put d rated 14s on it. There are e rated lt tires available but I would rather stick with st's.
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Old 12-16-2015, 05:32 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Canadiancrew View Post
I have the same issue with a 2016 Flagstaff 27rlws and a gross weight of 7700 lbs and heavy on the back with slides on both sides and therefore light on the tongue. To complicate things they are 14 inch tires with no room between the axles to go to a 15 inch. The photo is not mine but the same.
This is a big RV trailer industry problem and its not just FR. The regulation for tire fitment for your trailer reads in two parts.

1st there is the FMVSS that says the manufacturer must use tire fitments that provide, at the minimum, enough load capacity - via tire inflation - to support each axleís established GAWR. (The trailer builder establishes the GAWR). What that means is an axle set at 5000# GAWR can have two tires rated at 2500# each and be an acceptable fitment.

2nd is a statement in that same section that says tire fitments and recommended inflation pressures must be appropriate. That clearly gives the trailer manufacturer the option to use whatever tires they want to as long as they meet the minimum standard.

For the RV trailer owner there is hardly any wiggle room with selecting replacement tires. Once a trailer manufacturer selects, fits and certifies their fitments itís nearly impossible to get any other recommendations from them except use like sized tires or any approved options. What options? Some of the big trailers have them. Little trailers do not.

We are acclimated to the workings of the automotive industry when it comes to replacement tires. The Tire & Rim association (TRA), vehicle manufacturers and tire manufacturers long ago sit down and established a system for acceptable replacement tire selections. You can drive into a tire retailer and feel confident that they will be able to provide you with acceptable replacements approved by your vehicle manufacturer without any hassle. That will not happen with RV trailer tires. There are no approved lists. Savvy retailers will only replace your trailer tires with like sized and designed tires. If you want options ďask your trailer manufacturer ď for approval.

If you go outside of the ropes with your replacements what kind of warranty protection will you end up with for the tires and from your trailer manufacturer. Suspension and frame items could be voided with unacceptable replacements.

Those and other things about the establishment is what keeps me from making anything but options and hypothetical at best.

Some of the smaller European tire manufacturers are building 14Ē tires approved for trailer axle service. And, there are LRDs with over 2200# load capacity. Will your trailer manufacturer approve their use in your situation? Youíll have to ask. Good luck.
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Old 12-16-2015, 06:57 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by gljurczyk View Post
No, they won't pop, but that is the norm. They come with just enough and get away with it. Probably Trail Express "C" rated. Move up to a "D" rated tire. They are just an accident waiting to happen. We all been through it....
I agree with the accident waiting to happen and I also believe that there is a very good chance they will pop also! My CC was 11 months old and I got flagged down by a fellow behind me, and he said "you're back tire has a huge bubble in it". He was right and had I not been within 3 or 4 miles of my destination I would have pulled the tire off right then. The bubble was about the size of a softball, and was smacking the shock absorber as it went around.
Do yourself a favor and get those chinese junks off of your rig ASAP! Buy a set of Michelins or a good brand name you will not regret it.
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Old 12-18-2015, 09:00 AM   #17
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So the tires on my rig are size 205/75R14. I did a fairly casual search for replacement tires and came up with nothing! Yes I can get brand names, but they are all "ST" types and the load range is the same - C and 1760 lbs.

Maybe I'm overthinking this. I'll have 400lbs of water, leaving me with 2000lbs of cargo space. After I buy a couple cases of beer and DW stocks up the fridge, what else is there? We should be way under the limit.

EDIT: I was wrong! There is at least one other tire, load range D:
http://www.easternmarine.com/loadsta...e-load-range-d
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