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Old 06-23-2015, 01:33 PM   #11
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So the sidewalls on my F-150 TV tires (P-rated) state a max PSI of 44, yet the white sticker in the door states max PSI of 35 cold and states the load limits for front and rear axles. Do I get a higher load limit based on the 44 PSI stated on the sidewalls?
If you increase the tire pressure, you increase the load carrying capacity of the tire but not necessarily the capacity of the axle.
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Old 06-23-2015, 03:24 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by wpgman19 View Post
yet the white sticker in the door states max PSI of 35 cold

One thing I don't see anybody else mentioning...If you look closer, I suspect you will see that your door tag does not use the word "Max". It likely reads "Min", or simply "inflate to xyz PSI cold" (no mention of Min or Max). This is a VERY common misunderstanding/mistake. This factory PSI specification will be assuming a minimal load (driver/fuel/and MAYBE a passenger or two). As you increase your load, you increase your need for higher PSI to hold that load up. As you increase your PSI to hold that load up, you will at some point reach the "Max" PSI that the tire can hold inside without letting it out (blowout). Your tires "Max" PSI rating will be posted on the side of the tire.
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Old 06-23-2015, 07:40 PM   #13
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To all who wrote in it has noting to to with ride quailty

Quote:
Originally Posted by wpgman19 View Post
So the sidewalls on my F-150 TV tires (P-rated) state a max PSI of 44, yet the white sticker in the door states max PSI of 35 cold and states the load limits for front and rear axles. Do I get a higher load limit based on the 44 PSI stated on the sidewalls? If so, how do I find that out? I have been towing at the 44 PSI, and even there, I feel like the tries could use a bit more air (based on visual appearance and bounce), not less.
The tire pressure on the tire HAS noting to do with YOUR vehicle!
The pressure stated on the tire is the MAX pressure that the tire was manufactured for, and has nothing to do with the vehicle it is mounted on, as that tire can be mounted on any vehicle the rim fits correctly on.

The tire pressure that you are suppose to use is what the manufacture has in the door jam, and it is this tire pressure that the National Highway Safety uses for it's testing for safety. So upping the pressure will not give you any more towing capacity, it will not give it any more carrying capacity, as all these numbers have been built in at what is in your door jam and can not be changed.

And the other thing that most people seem to not know or pay attention to is what is the max pressure that the WHEEL is built for, and I will guess that the wheels on your ford will only have a max pressure of may be 40 psi, so putting 44 psi in the tires could create a catastrophic failure of your wheel, meaning it could break the wheel and you could have and accident.

I really wish people would learn all these things and if any one wants to it is all at the web site for the NHS and they would be very happy for all concerned that more people would learn how the be safe with there tires.
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Old 06-23-2015, 07:48 PM   #14
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Old 06-23-2015, 07:57 PM   #15
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On my Ford F350 the max air pressure for the load range E tires is 80 PSI, if you look on the inside of the wheel it will state the max pressure for the wheel or rim of the tire. On my F350 the wheel rim has a max air pressure of 100 PSI. Most trucks I have seen have one load range higher wheel rims than the load range tires that come on the vehicle. I have always assumed that is so you can up grade the tires if desired by still use the factory wheels. But when in question just look at the inside/ back of the wheel for the whole story.
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Old 06-24-2015, 02:01 AM   #16
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TV Tire Pressures

I'm running the same Perelli's on my F150 Screw and for towing always run the max 44PSI. No issues. They aren't a great tire for what we are using them for but I'm running them on a big trip this summer (12000km) and if they live I'll probably run them out. Doing a lot of gravel road and I'm wondering if the side walls will live. As far as handling....no issues. I pull a T28RKS Wildcat.....heavy trailer (8000lb dry) and no handling issue whatsoever .......mountains or flatlands . I'm about 400lbs under legal GCVW when we are ready to camp. However, these are a passenger rated tire Ford is putting on these trucks......bit of a joke.
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Old 06-24-2015, 02:49 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by wpgman19 View Post
So the sidewalls on my F-150 TV tires (P-rated) state a max PSI of 44, yet the white sticker in the door states max PSI of 35 cold and states the load limits for front and rear axles. Do I get a higher load limit based on the 44 PSI stated on the sidewalls? If so, how do I find that out? I have been towing at the 44 PSI, and even there, I feel like the tries could use a bit more air (based on visual appearance and bounce), not less.
The cold inflation pressures found on the tire placard are always the correct pressures for the original equipment tires and any replacements of the same size. Deviations from the tire placard pressures for such things as towing will be found in the owner’s manual - if needed.

When Passenger tires are used on a pick-up truck, SUV or passenger van, the maximum load capacity depicted on the sidewall must be decreased by dividing it by 1.1. The vehicle manufacturer will insure that factor is taken into consideration during tire selection and setting the cold recommended inflation pressures found on the tire placard.

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Old 06-24-2015, 04:00 PM   #18
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The cold inflation pressures found on the tire placard are always the correct pressures for the original equipment tires and any replacements of the same size. Deviations from the tire placard pressures for such things as towing will be found in the owner’s manual - if needed.

When Passenger tires are used on a pick-up truck, SUV or passenger van, the maximum load capacity depicted on the sidewall must be decreased by dividing it by 1.1. The vehicle manufacturer will insure that factor is taken into consideration during tire selection and setting the cold recommended inflation pressures found on the tire placard.

Airdale
Yes and no. The placard tire pressure assumes an average (normal), not maximum load. Depending on the SUV or van (can't say for US-made trucks), the placard tire pressure also may be optimized for ride qualities rather than what is best for the tire.

In most cases I deal with (V6 SUVs and smaller, minivans), the tires will perform and wear better if the pressure is increased above the placard pressure when towing or carrying near maximum loads. Most tire shops that know what they are doing will recommend the same if they know the circumstances. And no, this information is not in any owner's manual I have seen.

In an ideal world, we would be constantly be resetting tire pressures based on actual loading. And we would have charts showing recommended pressure for a given load. And we would have an easy way to determine actual loads on the tires.

Since my world is far from ideal, I use the placard as a minimum tire pressure starting point. If my TV is heavily loaded, I'll add 6lbs+ to placard while staying under the max tire sidewall pressure. If I'm descending down to lower altitudes (I start out at 7000ft), I'll add another lb or two. Outside air temps at both home and destination influence my thinking, too. If my vehicle has a full load of people but not much else, I'll add 3lbs+ to placard. I allow the extra pressure to dissapate over time (tires typically lose a little pressure every month). Since following these guidelines, I have gotten very even wear across the tread. Pressures are adjusted monthly and before each major trip.

For the ST tires, I simply go with sidewall max pressure at beginning of each trip, and call it good.

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Old 07-04-2015, 08:42 PM   #19
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The 44 is part of a safety warning aimed at protecting the tire tech during tire inflation.
There are different rules and wording for PSR vs LY & ST vs TBR type tires.

I did a post on my blog yesterday just on this subject if you care about the facts and regulations.
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Old 07-04-2015, 09:09 PM   #20
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I went recently and got LT e rated tires and my tire guy said I was going to notice the change in the ride, I also added airbags. Now I don't really see much difference in the ride until you get on a real rough road even with the airbags inflated. My wife, has a bad back, says only thing she really noticed was the truck sits higher. Handling is a little different also, steering is a bit quicker to react.
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