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Old 07-04-2015, 09:33 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by silverback 35ts View Post
The tire pressure on the tire HAS noting to do with YOUR vehicle!
The pressure stated on the tire is the MAX pressure that the tire was manufactured for, and has nothing to do with the vehicle it is mounted on, as that tire can be mounted on any vehicle the rim fits correctly on.

The tire pressure that you are suppose to use is what the manufacture has in the door jam, and it is this tire pressure that the National Highway Safety uses for it's testing for safety. So upping the pressure will not give you any more towing capacity, it will not give it any more carrying capacity, as all these numbers have been built in at what is in your door jam and can not be changed.

And the other thing that most people seem to not know or pay attention to is what is the max pressure that the WHEEL is built for, and I will guess that the wheels on your ford will only have a max pressure of may be 40 psi, so putting 44 psi in the tires could create a catastrophic failure of your wheel, meaning it could break the wheel and you could have and accident.

I really wish people would learn all these things and if any one wants to it is all at the web site for the NHS and they would be very happy for all concerned that more people would learn how the be safe with there tires.

So you are saying that if I put 80 psi 10 ply tires on my truck, and the sticker says 35 psi, then I should run 35 psi in my LR E tires? B.S.!!!!!!!!! Go to your local tire store and tell them that. They will laugh you right out of their store. My local tire shop told me to never run 15 psi less than max tire psi. They said that if I do, I run the risk of premature failure of the tire.


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Old 07-05-2015, 08:14 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by silverback 35ts View Post

And the other thing that most people seem to not know or pay attention to is what is the max pressure that the WHEEL is built for, and I will guess that the wheels on your ford will only have a max pressure of may be 40 psi, so putting 44 psi in the tires could create a catastrophic failure of your wheel, meaning it could break the wheel and you could have and accident.

I really wish people would learn all these things and if any one wants to it is all at the web site for the NHS and they would be very happy for all concerned that more people would learn how the be safe with there tires.
Won't debate max vs. sticker pressure cause in most cases that is for ride quality and stopping distances. However, saying that the rims on a truck are maxed out at 40 psi is incorrect!

For one thing, from the factory the tires are usually inflated to MAX tire pressure to help seat them, and for storage purposes on different lots while headed to a dealer, and for when sitting on a dealer's lot. They usually do the exact sticker pressure during PDI.

And if you have a tire sticker that shows 35 psi, and you set that pressure on a cold morning, and the temps go up sixty degrees, that can easily happen between spring and summer, you have just exceeded the 40 psi you stated.

Every set of tire rims I have had, and I have had many, are rated well over 40 psi. Fancy 20" rims rated a bit less than the 16-18" standard for most trucks.

And to think the auto manufacture will ship vehicles with tires stamped with a max rating 4 psi above what the rim is rated for is a big lawsuit in the making.
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Old 07-05-2015, 12:04 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Tonkatoy77 View Post
So you are saying that if I put 80 psi 10 ply tires on my truck, and the sticker says 35 psi, then I should run 35 psi in my LR E tires? B.S.!!!!!!!!! Go to your local tire store and tell them that. They will laugh you right out of their store. My local tire shop told me to never run 15 psi less than max tire psi. They said that if I do, I run the risk of premature failure of the tire.


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I think I would tell someone that put Load Range E tires on a vehicle that came with Passenger type tires was a waist of money as the rest of the suspension was not designed for more capacity than one would get from 35 psi in the OE size tire.

I also think the guy in your tire shop exaggerates a bit about premature failure. The general guideline for the definition of a "Flat tire" ie when damage may occur is a loss of 20% air pressure from what is needed to carry the load. Now if the inflation needed is 75 psi or more then yes loosing 15 psi may result in damage. BUT the MAX load capacity of a tire and the inflation needed to support that load may be greater than what your specific RV needs.

" I think I heard it one said that Generalizations are Generally wrong"
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Old 07-05-2015, 02:00 PM   #24
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I think I would tell someone that put Load Range E tires on a vehicle that came with Passenger type tires was a waist of money as the rest of the suspension was not designed for more capacity than one would get from 35 psi in the OE size tire.

I also think the guy in your tire shop exaggerates a bit about premature failure. The general guideline for the definition of a "Flat tire" ie when damage may occur is a loss of 20% air pressure from what is needed to carry the load. Now if the inflation needed is 75 psi or more then yes loosing 15 psi may result in damage. BUT the MAX load capacity of a tire and the inflation needed to support that load may be greater than what your specific RV needs.

" I think I heard it one said that Generalizations are Generally wrong"

I live in the Pacific Northwest where there are a lot of loggers. A lot of the logging crews are running F-150 crew cabs. They are running 10 ply tires to reduce flats from rock punctures. Carrying capacity isn't the only reason to run a heavier tire.

But whether you run 15% less or 20% less, the above post recommends, what, 55%? That, in my opinion, is a flat tire. And, on an 80 psi tire what's the difference between 15 and 20 percent? 4 psi. So 4 psi difference between your opinion and my tire guys opinion isn't much of an "exaggeration" to me.


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Old 07-05-2015, 03:43 PM   #25
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I live in the Pacific Northwest where there are a lot of loggers. A lot of the logging crews are running F-150 crew cabs. They are running 10 ply tires to reduce flats from rock punctures. Carrying capacity isn't the only reason to run a heavier tire.

But whether you run 15% less or 20% less, the above post recommends, what, 55%? That, in my opinion, is a flat tire. And, on an 80 psi tire what's the difference between 15 and 20 percent? 4 psi. So 4 psi difference between your opinion and my tire guys opinion isn't much of an "exaggeration" to me.

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It was the 35 psi that caught my eye. If your placard actually says 35 then I figured your OE tires were Passenger tires and wondered why you would buy a P/U that came with PSR and then buy LT LR-E.

Do F150 Crew cabs come with standard load PSR tires? Maybe standard 2 door F150's do.

If an owner changes tires from the OE size, type or LR then it is the owners responsibility to learn the correct minimum inflation for the new tires and IMO to add a new sticker with the new information just as a dealer is suppose to do if they make significant changes to a vehicle and its tires.
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Old 07-05-2015, 03:49 PM   #26
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I think I would tell someone that put Load Range E tires on a vehicle that came with Passenger type tires was a waist of money as the rest of the suspension was not designed for more capacity than one would get from 35 psi in the OE size tire...
Not true, 1/2 T PU that comes with P tires and they cannot carry the max load of the PU without a lot of squirming, etc.
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Old 07-05-2015, 03:59 PM   #27
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I see no conflict. Ford lists a PSI that offers a soft ride. The tire mfg lists a PSI on the side wall for maximum load carrying capacity for their product. BTW, the number Ford lists should equal the vehicles GVWR.
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Old 07-05-2015, 04:33 PM   #28
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Mine says on the id inside the door 265 75 17 and it came with OE 245 75 17 and yes unless you specify you want LT tires the come with P tires. The reason is most trucks are used as passenger vehicles not as a truck is meant to be used.
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Old 07-05-2015, 04:36 PM   #29
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Not true, 1/2 T PU that comes with P tires and they cannot carry the max load of the PU without a lot of squirming, etc.
I'm confused. What did I say that was not true?

I said putting LT LR-E tires on a F150 was a waste of money. You think that is a good idea ?

I said the rest of the suspension in a F150 cannot support the full load that LT LR-E could carry. You seem to think the F150 can carry that loading?


I think the big problem is that a fictitious example was presented when someone tried to make a point and I made the mistake of responding.
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Old 07-05-2015, 04:39 PM   #30
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Mine says on the id inside the door 265 75 17 and it came with OE 245 75 17 and yes unless you specify you want LT tires the come with P tires. The reason is most trucks are used as passenger vehicles not as a truck is meant to be used.

If your placard says P245/75R17 and you were given P265/75R17 then the dealer is in violation of Federal Regulation as the placard is suppose to match the equipment as sold by the dealer. If the dealer made the change at you8r request they were suppose to change the placard sticker.
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