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Old 09-28-2012, 03:24 PM   #11
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There may be a couple of things to try to avoid contact when backing uphill. If you have airbags on your truck, deflate them to the minimum setting. You can back the camper's wheels onto 2x6 lengths of wood to raise the camper until the truck is on the same slope. That may be enough...

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Old 09-28-2012, 04:56 PM   #12
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You could flip the axle. It will give you more clearance back there.

But it also makes the 5th ride higher and makes the lower last step at the entrance higher. It could also make your trailer ride higher in the back.
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Old 09-28-2012, 11:56 PM   #13
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How about using a block of nylon such as what cutting boards are made of. Should prevent a non marring solution if bolts are countersunk enough (would be a wear item).

Most of the time the contact would be very minamal and rollers would work fine as you probably would not be doing donuts while in contact with the ground.

Also yes everyone that said that just a few seconds twisted would damage the frame are corect. Most collision damage is done in a split second, but we all know what the op is talking about - I think about it all the time since I have 35" tires on my truck most of the time and my tail is a little low.
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Old 09-30-2012, 08:21 PM   #14
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I have done all of the suggestions: wood blocks, rollers, axle flip and in an old trailer I changed to a straight axle from a 3inch drop axle even bigger tires.
I would say blocks are the easiest and cheapest though they do not work well with turns. Trying to lay boards on the correct radius is tough and takes two people because you can never watch your blind side.
For me, rollers work better than nothing and do not take as much weight or stress as one might think in a fairly straight line. Think about the leaf springs, they will continue to hold some weight until the tires are off the ground. Most people jack up a trailer from under the axle because it only takes an inch or so to get the tire off the ground. But if you jack from the frame you must raise maybe 6-8inches to unload the leaf spring. If your going to drag, and most all trailers do at some time, better to have less friction less stress on the frame. All this said do not install rollers on the bumper and the further forward on the frame you can do the better structurally near a cross member would be good. When I did mine I rebuilt the triangle drag braces and mounted the rollers so that they were just barely lower. This is not a solution only better than nothing also dragging in a straight line is less stress than in turns.
The one that solved it for me was the axle flip or axle change out. Axle flips usually give a 5 ľ inch raise and you should change the hitch height to be level . Axle flips are cheap, 24$ for parts on my trailer, but it does change the center of gravity. The more expensive and probably better way is to build and install a sub frame between suspension and main frame. This can give any height, 3inch maybe, but you will have to realign axles and I did not want that much work and head ache. Here is another positive reason for axle flip, you can always flip it back if it wasnít right for your trailer and its easer the second time.
And last, I believe you are worried about a trailer you donít even have yet so you really will just have to wait an see if there even is an issue. Placement of the axle, how the frame is designed, size of tireÖ.will determine any issues. Might even be better/easier to just redesign the driveway.
Good luck and repost, I find it fun to listen to how others have similar issues and how they solved.

Keep the shiny side up and the dirty side down
John
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Old 09-30-2012, 10:11 PM   #15
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John, Your suggestions are very helpful . Did the axle flip make a noticeable difference in the handling of the trailer.
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Old 10-01-2012, 01:00 PM   #16
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I was worried about 5 1/4 inches being to high so it took me a while to go for it. I have a 2011 26TT and making changes this early was a tough-ish one, but after dragging-ass in most and hitch in some driveways and I also have the same home driveway issue, I did it.
I find it to tow as good as before and maybe even better when it comes to the big-rigs sucking you in as they fly by. It seems that the hieght has given some kind of vacuum reliece. I put 3000ml before the flip and 5000ml after so I have a pritty good feel. I do carry a step now and a set of blocks for my stablizers but I dont drag.
3 inches would have been the perfict lift but time and money and whats another 2 1/4 inches.
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Old 11-02-2012, 02:09 PM   #17
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Northern Tool Casters

[QUOTE=dunnnc;258087]Northern Tool has some heavy duty swivel casters the should work if you're worried about side loads.

My V-Cross Superlite VFK27 uses 2 1/4" I-beams and the heavier-duty casters at Northern Tool has mounting holes that are 3 to 4 inches center-to-center. I was thinking of using the swivel type, rotating them 45 degrees and using two of the four holes. Is there a better solution? I'm a little concerned that a hard grounding might bend the swivel bearing plate, but at about $15 a caster I wouldn't feel too bad if I had to replace them every once in a while.

Also I was thinking of cutting off the old skid plates, both of which are broken. Any reason not to?
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Old 11-02-2012, 03:21 PM   #18
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[QUOTE=ProjectPro;271486]
Quote:
Originally Posted by dunnnc View Post
Northern Tool has some heavy duty swivel casters the should work if you're worried about side loads.

My V-Cross Superlite VFK27 uses 2 1/4" I-beams and the heavier-duty casters at Northern Tool has mounting holes that are 3 to 4 inches center-to-center. I was thinking of using the swivel type, rotating them 45 degrees and using two of the four holes. Is there a better solution? I'm a little concerned that a hard grounding might bend the swivel bearing plate, but at about $15 a caster I wouldn't feel too bad if I had to replace them every once in a while.

Also I was thinking of cutting off the old skid plates, both of which are broken. Any reason not to?
See no reason not to.
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