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Old 02-26-2015, 03:47 PM   #61
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Originally Posted by Happy Vibe View Post
If you have used the ez lube per the instructions there should be no air pocket between the bearings.
I dont see how one could expect 100% evacuation of air with the dexter app...The BB is under a slight pressure and is pretty much devoid of any air possible
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Old 02-26-2015, 03:48 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by onetonford View Post
That's funny my ez lube were never made for marine use.
dexter specified, at least on my last viewing, that the ez-lube is for marine applications on their website...
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Old 02-26-2015, 03:54 PM   #63
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A BB is a one way unit. You put the grease in , how does the air get out? The marine environment is more sever than an RV (you don't back your RV into water) so it should work better.
This will be my last post on this thread as you seem to be set in your ways and this is an arguments that neither of use is going to win.
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Old 02-26-2015, 04:49 PM   #64
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it gets burped out the disk in front. but in hind sight, no debating, the introduction of grease from the inner bearing area is much better than the BB method. I would imagine with all the pumping, spinning, burping that all the air would escape, but possibly not. I entered into the academia of this thread because I'm not a fan of hubs crammed with grease on rvs, and to point out that dexter intended for the ezlube design for marine applications....peace
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Old 02-26-2015, 04:53 PM   #65
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Originally Posted by Happy Vibe View Post
If you have used the ez lube per the instructions there should be no air pocket between the bearings.
I agree that disassembly is the best way but not every year, and this video FROM DEXTER confirms that. I repacked mine last spring and don't plan on doing it this year unless we go on a long trip.I do plan to jack the trailer up and pump a few pumps into the grease fittings that's it.
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Old 02-26-2015, 05:13 PM   #66
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the old school recommendations were every year or 10,000 miles. but, that was back when long fiber grease was the norm. I no longer advise folks to pack every year but stick with the 10,000 mile. I have seen one custy go 16,000. BB do have an advantage in marine applications where even if there is trapped air, there is a pressurized grease cavity in the dust cover to fill any void caused by contracting air. I see no problem with your lubrication plan..However, properly packed bearings should need no grease until the next interval...10,000 miles and up to 2 or 3 years if good grease is used.
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Old 03-01-2015, 09:00 PM   #67
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In 2008 we had a bearing failure on a (I won't name the brand) at about 9000 miles. In addition to the bearings, the spindle was also ruined. The manufacturer replaced the entire axle under warranty. I don't know what caused the failure, but we eventually traded for an (same brand, different model). Before long it also lost a pair of bearings which were replaced. I began feeling hubs nearly every time we'd stop and one or two were often running too warm, not always the same ones. I began blaming the bearings themselves, so changed them more than once trying to find better quality. Also tried different greases with no improvement. So I purchased new axles, changing from the stock 3500 lb. axles to 4000 lb. I was greatly disappointed to have yet another failure even though I was doing at least annual inspection/maintenance. The manufacturer, my dealer, and two alignment shops all were puzzled. Diagonal measurements between axle tubes were okay as were measurements from axle tubes up to a plumb bob dropped down from the king pin. Everything looked square until I finally measured between spindles; the left two were more than 2" father apart than the right two. Surprisingly, the tires wore normally. Yes, I hit some bumps but no, I don't drive over curbs or boulders. And no, I don't overload. Anyway, traded again for a (same brand, different model--guess I'm a slow learner). Guess what; at about 6000 miles three tires badly worn. Found that those 3 spindles were angled upward. Manufacturer paid to have an alignment done. It seems that the only ways to adjust torsion systems are to either bend the axle tubes (which was done to my last one), or cut the axle mounts off the frame and reposition.
I know torsion systems are generally reliable; thousands of you run them with no problem, so can only blame my troubles on misfortune. One of the failures was discovered at a remote campground in Utah--I'm from Minnesota. The bearing seized to the spindle and I couldn't get it off. Winter was coming--thought I was going to have to leave it there, but found a guy with a torch. With heat, it finally came off. We cleaned up the spindle, reassembled with new bearings and drove home.

Correct track can be used to correct the alignment. The geometry is important.
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Old 03-01-2015, 09:57 PM   #68
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To add to the OPs original concern - I wouldn't trust how these axles are greased from the factory - Lippert (or other chassis) or FR.
Mine has the EZ Lube hubs and I used up more than a tube of grease to fill the hubs the first time after we took delivery.
Sure, the bearings had grease in them, but the EZ Lube hubs were never 'properly' filled as I believe they should have been.

Preventative maintenance of trailer hubs and bearings is relatively simple and it adds a lot of peace-of-mind to know they are correctly maintained.
we agree on not liking how the manufacturer greases the hubs but for different reasons. first off i hope you did not add grease to the grease that lippert already had in the hub. the two different greases may not be compatible. one should dissamble, clean, pack the bearings with the grease in the grease gun, thenm assemble and fill from there if so desired. secondly, lippert uses a runny grease. i spoke with NHTSA and sent them a sample. they called it a semi-viscuous grease. it is unlike any grease ive seen. a dollop on your finger will drop off on a 60 degree day. we lost 40 percent of our brake assemblies within the first year. I recommend a repack on any new trailer with this grease.
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Old 03-01-2015, 11:01 PM   #69
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dexter specified, at least on my last viewing, that the ez-lube is for marine applications on their website...
Hubs Yes
Electric brakes No
These axles are not for marine use but for travel trailers
They use the Hubs for both applications I agree but on these trailers no.
I like the Idea that they are water resistant but no axle can keep all the water out some will get in that is why the BB is better than the ez-lube axle for marine use the grease gets pushed to the back by pressure of the grease at the cap pushing any water that gets past the seal and out the back. Most boat trailers have hydraulic drum brakes. But newer and better ones have changed to SS disks.
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Old 03-01-2015, 11:20 PM   #70
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Hubs Yes
Electric brakes No
These axles are not for marine use but for travel trailers
They use the Hubs for both applications I agree but on these trailers no.
I like the Idea that they are water resistant but no axle can keep all the water out some will get in that is why the BB is better than the ez-lube axle for marine use the grease gets pushed to the back by pressure of the grease at the cap pushing any water that gets past the seal and out the back. Most boat trailers have hydraulic drum brakes. But newer and better ones have changed to SS disks.
not sure where we're going here. dexter makes the one axle but states that the ez-lube portion is for marine applications. otherwise were pretty much in agreement here unless I missed something...
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