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Old 05-04-2016, 05:18 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by OldCoot View Post
This says between 90 lb/ft to 120 lb/ft. I tighten my lugs on the aluminum wheels to 110 lb/ft.

BTW, they state ft/lbs which is technically incorrect. Horsepower is measured in ft/lbs, torque is measured in lb/ft.
Handy chart, thanx.

As for definitions...

Ft-lb versus lb-ft is like degrees Centigrade versus Celsius. Merely a Politically Correct and otherwise meaningless change. BTW, torque is a product of force and distance and therefore can never be expressed as ft/lbs.

Power is the product of work and time where work is a force applied through a distance. One horsepower is defined as 33,000 lb-ft/min or 550 ft-lb/sec. Note that I stated the work part of the equation interchangeably as the result is unchanged.

Interesting to think that if I were to struggle with all of my might to lift the front of my 5th wheel (pin weight > 1,600#) all afternoon until I passed out that I will have achieved no work and created no power despite my efforts. I guess the moral is to not waste effort on immovable objects.
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Old 05-04-2016, 08:38 PM   #22
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Handy chart, thanx.

As for definitions...

Ft-lb versus lb-ft is like degrees Centigrade versus Celsius. Merely a Politically Correct and otherwise meaningless change...
Has nothing to do with Politically Correctness. It is a matter of definition as defined by Newton's Second Law for Rotations.
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Old 05-05-2016, 12:10 PM   #23
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Forest River generic TT 2016 owner's manual, page #19.

http://idn.tweddle.com/bundle/showIt...S&itemtype=PDF
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Old 05-05-2016, 04:30 PM   #24
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Old 05-05-2016, 06:25 PM   #25
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Aluminum and steel wheels flex differently and therefore may be seated differently against the hub so that is the reason for the different torque values and re-torque requirements.
Ted
Thing is most do not know how to properly torque a wheel. 99% of people will lower the tire to keep it from spinning as they torque the nuts and when finished lower it to remove the jack. To torque the rim correctly lower the rim and torque the nuts, jack it back up, rotate the wheel to a different position, lower it and torque again. Continue to do this until all the nuts retain the proper torque setting, usually takes about 5 or 6 times to get them all. It is a PIA to do it this way but that is how it should be done.
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Old 05-05-2016, 08:38 PM   #26
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Thing is most do not know how to properly torque a wheel. 99% of people will lower the tire to keep it from spinning as they torque the nuts and when finished lower it to remove the jack. To torque the rim correctly lower the rim and torque the nuts, jack it back up, rotate the wheel to a different position, lower it and torque again. Continue to do this until all the nuts retain the proper torque setting, usually takes about 5 or 6 times to get them all. It is a PIA to do it this way but that is how it should be done.
Maybe, but ain't happening. Never had a wheel come loose on either TT or TV, and always torque with wheels on ground
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Old 05-05-2016, 09:01 PM   #27
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Has nothing to do with Politically Correctness. It is a matter of definition as defined by Newton's Second Law for Rotations.
Not exactly. It's more tied to who's using it and for what. I've used both in college in different courses. For all intents and purposes (for our purposes anyway) it doesn't matter much.

From Wikipedia:

Pound-foot (torque)
A pound-foot (lb·ft or lbf·ft) is a unit of torque (a pseudovector). One pound-foot is the torque created by one pound force acting at a perpendicular distance of one foot from a pivot point.

One pound-foot is approximately 1.355818 newton meters.

The name "pound-foot", intended to minimize confusion with the foot-pound as a unit of work, was apparently first proposed by British physicist Arthur Mason Worthington.[1] However, the torque unit is often still referred to as the foot-pound (ft·lb or ft·lbf).[2]

Foot-pound (energy)
Not to be confused with Pound-foot (torque) or Foot-poundal.
The foot-pound force (symbol: ft·lbf or ft·lbf), or simply foot-pound (symbol: ft·lb) is a unit of work or energy in the Engineering and Gravitational Systems in United States customary and imperial units of measure. It is the energy transferred on applying a force of one pound-force (lbf) through a linear displacement of one foot. The corresponding SI unit is the joule.

Contents [hide]
1 Usage
2 Conversion to other units
2.1 Energy units
2.2 Power units
3 See also
Usage[edit]
The foot-pound is often used to specify the muzzle energy of a bullet in small arms ballistics, particularly in the United States.

"Foot-pound" is sometimes also used as a unit of torque (see Pound-foot (torque)). In the United States this unit is often used to specify, for example, the tightness of a bolt or the output of an engine. Although they are dimensionally equivalent, energy (a scalar) and torque (a vector) are distinct physical quantities. Both energy and torque can be expressed as a product of a force vector with a displacement vector (hence pounds and feet); energy is the scalar product of the two, and torque is the vector product.
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Old 05-05-2016, 09:21 PM   #28
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I think we all were overworking the torque a little bit guys, LOL, just tighten the sh_t out of it and drive.
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Old 05-05-2016, 09:36 PM   #29
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Click on Owner's Manual, far right, top.

Forest River Manuals
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