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Old 07-19-2016, 09:44 AM   #51
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tire wear

I have been reading a lot of the post on TT tire failure and am very concerned with my tires. I bought my TT (2015 Wildwood Lite 262BHXL) in spring of 2015. The tires on it are Ridgeway Sport ST 205/75 C 14". I have gone over 4000 miles but did not notice my tire pressure was at 32 psi until after the first 2000. I have since put 50 psi in but have abnormal wear. I have attached a picture of the worst tire. Should I replace with the same brand and C rating or should I increase to a D rated tire? Is there something I should check for the abnormal wear? Any info would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 07-19-2016, 09:49 AM   #52
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I know. But, when making sharp turns parking in tight sites the axles will re- position from side to side which can cause them to hit suspension parts.

In a closer look at your picture the damaged area seems to be from something sharp. It appears to have started on the RH side as it's smoother there than on the LH side.

http://www.irv2.com/photopost/showfull.php?photo=30619
Sorry but in my experience what we see is the result of something like a pocket of air being built into the tire. The ragged appearance is from abrasion with the road of belt skim rubber which is not designed for any contact with the road surface. The "bubble" allowed the tread rubber to move against the road with every rotation and it then wore away at a faster rate then the surrounding rubber.

As I said earlier the tire should be returned to dealer for adjustment. FR made the decision to supply the Trail Express so IMO they need to take responsibility for their decisions.
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Old 07-19-2016, 10:00 AM   #53
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Originally Posted by Discipline39 View Post
I have been reading a lot of the post on TT tire failure and am very concerned with my tires. I bought my TT (2015 Wildwood Lite 262BHXL) in spring of 2015. The tires on it are Ridgeway Sport ST 205/75 C 14". I have gone over 4000 miles but did not notice my tire pressure was at 32 psi until after the first 2000. I have since put 50 psi in but have abnormal wear. I have attached a picture of the worst tire. Should I replace with the same brand and C rating or should I increase to a D rated tire? Is there something I should check for the abnormal wear? Any info would be greatly appreciated.
Once damage has been done to a tire from running low on pressure, putting air back in it does not "fix" the damage. I do not know why so many seem to believe that but know that putting spoiled milk back into the refrigerator doesn't "fix" the milk.

I see you have a TPMS. When did you install it? You need to run an active TPMS that provides reading to the driver of the air pressure in the tires.
You also need to do a detailed inspection as outlined in THIS blog post.

The tires on the TT are worn out. You are lucky they did not fail due to poor maintenance (lack of proper inflation).
Moving to LR-D may be a good choice but you still need to keep them fully inflated to 65 psi they require. Have you confirmed your actual load on each axle? When you do you will see that the load is not split 50/50 on each axle not is it split 50/50 side to side. Your most loaded tire probably carries 200 - 400 more pounds than the light loaded tire.
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Old 07-19-2016, 10:10 AM   #54
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There are a few different reasons for a tire to fail. Loss of air pressure is the "cause" that TPMS can warn about. No idea what you mean by "blowout" as that word is used by many to identify almost any failure. Possibly it was a Tread Separation (bot broken belts or slipped belts) or a Run Low Flex (which you avoided because you now have a TPM (good decision)
Bet if you didn't have the TPMS you would have suffered a Run Low Flex and would now be complaining about foreign made junk tires.
When I see a puff of air just as I looked back, I pulled off the I95 and slowly went a few 100' to the off ramp. By the time I got to the off ramp and stopped the tire was just shot. Gy showed me where the side wall blew and 3 or 4" split in it. Can't repair a sidewall. I call it a Blow out but I also do not write blogs..... PS: tireman9, I was not complaining I was stating facts. Trail Express are Junk IMO. They should have never been "C" rated to begin with for that weight. It's pretty easy to weight a trailer, When you blow a whole though the sidewall or split they are junk. Gy Marathons where always my choice that I used 3 years plus ago GY moved all there ST tires off shore, they used to be made in Alabama and NC. They were good then, Now I question there construction. I only ever used GY on all my trailers, but no more...
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Old 07-19-2016, 10:13 AM   #55
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Thanks Tireman. I just recently put the TPMS system on (that's when I noticed the lower pressure.) Buying new from a dealer, I mistakenly assumed that it would have been done correctly. This is my first TT and am quite new to this type of camping.
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Old 07-19-2016, 05:14 PM   #56
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I Finally got on the PC so I can show this "egg-shaped" tire that the tire service man caught before it blew, while changing the last blow. Then he told me what to look for. This is a LR E and was at 80 PSI when he removed it from the trailer.

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Old 07-20-2016, 11:25 AM   #57
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I Finally got on the PC so I can show this "egg-shaped" tire that the tire service man caught before it blew, while changing the last blow. Then he told me what to look for. This is a LR E and was at 80 PSI when he removed it from the trailer.
Attachment 114686

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Yup and a complaint for each tire should be filed with NHTSA (including the full DOT serial).
Quality will not improve till the tire companies feel a bit of pain in the pocket book. This pain comes in the form of a recall. A recall will never be initiated until there is an investigation and that will not start if there are not a good number of complaints on file at NHTSA.
The good news / bad news for RV owners is that tire failures do not result in personal injury or death and with a limited budged NHTSA has to prioritize the use of their resources with injury getting first priority.

Some facts:
1. NHTSA does not monitor RV forums.
2. I see maybe 20 to 40 more complaints about tires online than I can find in the NHTSA database which means RV owners are not making the effort to file complaints.
3. A review of the few complaints that are on file, show that only a very few RV owners can provide the tire DOT serial which is a critical part of the investigation.
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Old 07-21-2016, 09:02 AM   #58
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Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
Yup and a complaint for each tire should be filed with NHTSA (including the full DOT serial).
Quality will not improve till the tire companies feel a bit of pain in the pocket book. This pain comes in the form of a recall. A recall will never be initiated until there is an investigation and that will not start if there are not a good number of complaints on file at NHTSA.
The good news / bad news for RV owners is that tire failures do not result in personal injury or death and with a limited budged NHTSA has to prioritize the use of their resources with injury getting first priority.

Some facts:
1. NHTSA does not monitor RV forums.
2. I see maybe 20 to 40 more complaints about tires online than I can find in the NHTSA database which means RV owners are not making the effort to file complaints.
3. A review of the few complaints that are on file, show that only a very few RV owners can provide the tire DOT serial which is a critical part of the investigation.
For what it's worth, I filed a complaint on 6/27/16 and still have not heard back.
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Old 07-21-2016, 12:44 PM   #59
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What I’m going to say here is supported by a lot of people in the tire industry who’s recommendations are similar to what I say in this post.

When you experience a catastrophic tire failure on a multi axle trailer the likelihood of other tire damage is very possible. Especially the tire (s) in tandem with the failed tire. As a minimal precaution, the tandem tire (s) should be inspected by a tire person. Actually, the safest thing that can be done is just change all tires on the side of the trailer where the initial failure occurred.

When reading failure reports filed with NHTSA the writer often describes “limping” to a place of repair. If that tandem tire is not also replaced, that owner is actually “limping” away from the repair facility and surely can expect that damaged tire to fail, probably catastrophically. Now if the trailer is allowed to limp in for another replacement for the previously damaged tire, the recently replaced tire is damaged. Don’t let that type of chain reaction fog your tire failure reports.
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Old 07-22-2016, 12:52 AM   #60
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What I’m going to say here is supported by a lot of people in the tire industry who’s recommendations are similar to what I say in this post.

When you experience a catastrophic tire failure on a multi axle trailer the likelihood of other tire damage is very possible. Especially the tire (s) in tandem with the failed tire. As a minimal precaution, the tandem tire (s) should be inspected by a tire person. Actually, the safest thing that can be done is just change all tires on the side of the trailer where the initial failure occurred.

When reading failure reports filed with NHTSA the writer often describes “limping” to a place of repair. If that tandem tire is not also replaced, that owner is actually “limping” away from the repair facility and surely can expect that damaged tire to fail, probably catastrophically. Now if the trailer is allowed to limp in for another replacement for the previously damaged tire, the recently replaced tire is damaged. Don’t let that type of chain reaction fog your tire failure reports.
You are correct. With Duals on the TV or tandem ib the TT, when one tire fails the companion has to support 200% load. "Limping" or slowing down for many seems to mean 45 to 50 mph rather than their normal 60 to 65 or faster. The reality is that you would need to never exceed 5 mph if you wanted to avoid doing damage to the un-failed tire. The other problem is that unless you run a TPMS you do not know when one tire started loosing air (and transferring load to the good tire) So even before you stopped it is entirely possible that serious damage has already been done to the "good" tire.
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