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Old 06-07-2016, 12:08 AM   #11
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OK any chance you can post or send a picture?
Did you file complaint with NHTSA?
Look-up the specs for his trailer. 6840# GAWRs with 3420# tires. IMO upgrades are desperately needed.
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Old 06-07-2016, 12:30 AM   #12
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When we started losing our marathon's, discount tire prorated them because the first tire tread separated while on the spare tire carrier with a plastic cover on. It looked like a twisted donut. He told me as they separate he will prorate.
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Old 06-07-2016, 03:32 AM   #13
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I also run withe Goodyear Gs after having a blowout with my Es. Insurance covered the damage. I was fortunate enough to have G-rated rims. No problems since, about 2 years.


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Old 06-07-2016, 04:26 AM   #14
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When we started losing our marathon's, discount tire prorated them because the first tire tread separated while on the spare tire carrier with a plastic cover on. It looked like a twisted donut. He told me as they separate he will prorate.
Is he also going to pay for the damage if you don't catch it and stop in time. Did he say how the tire thread separated while on a spare tire carrier by chance. Now that is a true first for me to hear.
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Old 06-07-2016, 07:23 AM   #15
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When we started losing our marathon's, discount tire prorated them because the first tire tread separated while on the spare tire carrier with a plastic cover on. It looked like a twisted donut. He told me as they separate he will prorate.
Did you file a complaint form with NHTSA? Until we get the numbers that reflect the current level of performance the lobbyists that oppose any increase in tire capacity & quality will continue to deliver the quality we currently have.
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Old 06-07-2016, 07:31 AM   #16
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Look-up the specs for his trailer. 6840# GAWRs with 3420# tires. IMO upgrades are desperately needed.
I think that's a normal number. Manufacturers will de-rate an axle to comply with some other limiting factor. In this case the limiting factor is max tire weight rating.



My TT was delivered with axles rated at 5,200 pounds. However, the trailer specs show an max axle weight of 5,040 pounds. Since the factory installed tires are rated at 2,520 each Forest River de-rated the axles to match the number derived from the specifications of the tires.

Going further, assume a manufacturer publishes an axle limit of 6,000 pounds. The axle placard says 7,000 pounds and the tires are 3,800 pounds each. Why did the manufacturer say 6,000? We probably will never know. Maybe they installed cheap mounting bolts that might break with a weight over 6,000. Or, did they position the axle on the frame where more than 6k would cause a problem. We'll probably never know. What I do know is that if I exceed the published number I might cause damage or get hurt. Just because I replaced my tires with E-loads of 2,800+ pounds doesn't mean my axle rating is now higher than the published number. It appears my axle limit should now be 5,200 pounds, but maybe, just maybe, there was another reason FR said 5,040.

Same scenario with my enclosed utility trailer. It has a single axle rated at 4,000 pounds and tires rated at 2,150 pounds each. However, the max trailer weight is published as 2,990 pounds. Why??? That number is used to comply with the max weight limit of 3,000 pounds for a trailer without brakes in the state where it was manufactured.
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Old 06-07-2016, 08:01 AM   #17
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I think that's a normal number. Manufacturers will de-rate an axle to comply with some other limiting factor. In this case the limiting factor is max tire weight rating.

Going further, assume a manufacturer publishes an axle limit of 6,000 pounds. The axle placard says 7,000 pounds and the tires are 3,800 pounds each. Why did the manufacturer say 6,000? We probably will never know. Maybe they installed cheap mounting bolts that might break with a weight over 6,000. Or, did they position the axle on the frame where more than 6k would cause a problem. We'll probably never know. What I do know is that if I exceed the published number I might cause damage or get hurt. Just because I replaced my tires with E-loads of 2,800+ pounds doesn't mean my axle rating is now higher than the published number. It appears my axle limit should now be 5,200 pounds, but maybe, just maybe, Ther was another reason FR said 5,040.

My TT was delivered with axles rated at 5,200 pounds. However, the trailer specs show an max axle weight of 5,040 pounds. Since the factory installed tires are rated at 2,520 each Forest River de-rated the axles to match the number derived from the specifications of the tires.

Same scenario with my enclosed utility trailer. It has a single axle rated at 4,000 pounds and tires rated at 2,150 pounds each. However, the max trailer weight is published as 2,990 pounds. Why??? That number is used to comply with the max weight limit of 3,000 pounds for a trailer without brakes in the state where it was manufactured.
Oh Nooooooooooooooo

Don't tell me RV mfg are reducing capacity numbers so they can use lower rated components.
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Old 06-07-2016, 11:22 AM   #18
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The vehicle manufacturer has more reasons than just tires to consider when setting axle ratings to a GAWR. All GAWRs plus the published hitch weight must equal GVWR. Then there is the cargo factor. NHTSA does not allow any fudge factor for the GVWR so all of the other factors are manipulated to provide stable figures to work with. If an owner is worried about tire capabilities they always have the option of reducing the weight of all the STUFF they carry as cargo.
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Old 06-07-2016, 11:44 AM   #19
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Please change to a G rated tire if your rims will support it. If not please buy new rims and tires that will support the g rated tire pressure.
I realize that it is a big hit to the budget. I realize the Manufacturer SHOULD have enough respect for their customers safety to provide an appropriate tire with a decent safety margin when loaded.
I'm running 16 inch G rated sailuns on my 3825. DW made them swap the marathons at pick-up. After much advice from the members of this forum.Pulled it from South Carolina to Ohio Sunday. Tires preformed as expected with no issues. Would I have wanted to pull it with the E tires. Not on your life. I would have worried the whole time.
Your front bath floorplan is even heavier than my front living. And it will load the tires differently. But for peace of mind find some g rated tires and rims. And file the NTHSA complaint. Tireman9 gives good advice. Listen to him.
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Old 06-07-2016, 05:54 PM   #20
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What the US RV industry needs is competition from companies that understand real vehicle engineering an build quality.

Detroit got its clock cleaned when Toyota, Honda etc came in with vehicles with good quality.
Maybe the Koreans can come to the US market and do the same for "Elkhart"

Today you can buy cars with 3 - 10 year warranty on various components. You do not have to take your Ford to Dearborn or your Honda to Marysville, OH etc to get a problem fixed. IMO the RV companies are banking on the idea that few owners will use their RV more than 3 months in the first year and if there is a problem then the dealer may simply be too busy to do the work in a reasonable time.

Would you tolerate leaving your car at a dealership for 4 weeks, and have no replacement vehicle offered, while a part is ordered?

The argument that an RV is a House on wheels just doesn't fly. How can every car sold in the US today have at least 3 year coverage on the 12v electric system but you can't more than a few months out of the 12v system in your RV?
Look at the quality of the wiring and connectors. I have seen some parts at Harbor Freight that look better than what I have found hidden behind panels in my motorhomes.
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