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Old 09-15-2013, 11:01 AM   #1
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12VDC only

Planning on buying either a Rockwood A128S or Flagstaff T12DDST, coming down to the dealer. The one thing I keep forgetting to ask is can I disable 110 input, have everything run off 12 VDC, but then turn 110 AC back on to Charge batteries or run a coffee maker.

I just don't want to blow out any 12 VDC equipment by accident. I am going to have 3 additional 12VDC outlets installed and 95 % of my equipment is 12 VDC.

I will also have on additional battery installed. Plus will be picking up a solar charger.

Also this will be a one person camper. With a lot of dry camping involve.

Any Help appreciated.
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Old 09-15-2013, 11:23 AM   #2
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Sure you can do that, just turn the breaker off in the panel, then when you want A/C just flip the breaker back on and then all the outlets will work also the charger.
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Old 09-15-2013, 12:13 PM   #3
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Not sure I understand your question. If the outside power cord is not plugged in, no 110vac in the trailer. I can only think of 3 thing that need 110VAC the cool cat heat pump and A/C. The micro wave and the battery charger. The ice box need it but will run off gas or 12VDC ( have been told the 12VDC will drain a battery in about 5 hours, it use very little gas). Hot water is gas. Gas heater fan is 12VDC.
We have 2 battery and have now done two 2 night dry camping and so far have only need 1 battery. I can turn 1 battery on at a time. I did change my lights to LEDs. Also the batteries are charged by the TV when moving from one site to another.
The only reason, I can see a need to hook to 110VAC, is it hot out and you need A/C.
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Old 09-15-2013, 12:24 PM   #4
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You understood perfectly and now I got the answers I needed. I am moving from tenting which means I still have white gas stoves etc. Totally new to having all that power available and what I can and can't do.

Again thanks
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Old 09-15-2013, 02:12 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by 1A Camper View Post
Not sure I understand your question. If the outside power cord is not plugged in, no 110vac in the trailer. I can only think of 3 thing that need 110VAC the cool cat heat pump and A/C. The micro wave and the battery charger. The ice box need it but will run off gas or 12VDC ( have been told the 12VDC will drain a battery in about 5 hours, it use very little gas). Hot water is gas. Gas heater fan is 12VDC.
We have 2 battery and have now done two 2 night dry camping and so far have only need 1 battery. I can turn 1 battery on at a time. I did change my lights to LEDs. Also the batteries are charged by the TV when moving from one site to another.
The only reason, I can see a need to hook to 110VAC, is it hot out and you need A/C.
One small point is that using two batteries separately will reduce the total amp hours available by a little bit, at least. This is due to Peukart's law that says the Amphour capacity is dependent on the current you are drawing from the battery. Draw more current as a percentage of the total capacity of your battery bank, and the batteries will deliver less.

Another factor is that longevity in a battery is affected by the depth of discharge, so that if you use more than 50% of the capacity of your battery bank, it will wear out prematurely.

Another factor is that a vehicle charging system will not charge a TT battery very well, because it is design for the TV battery and uses that battery to determine charge rate.

Anyone that drydocks extensively should have a good battery monitor to enhance the battery management and get the most out of the system. There are a variety of battery management systems out there, just search the forum. I have a Victron, but there are alot of others.
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Old 09-15-2013, 03:42 PM   #6
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I am posting a reply in hope of adding information.

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One small point is that using two batteries separately will reduce the total amp hours available by a little bit, at least. This is due to Peukart's law that says the Amphour capacity is dependent on the current you are drawing from the battery. Draw more current as a percentage of the total capacity of your battery bank, and the batteries will deliver less.

Above is true, now here come the BUT. I was talking A Frame trailer with LED lights. I doubt that at any time I have more then 2 Amp, if that, flowing, so if I use one battery at a time or tied together would have very little effect using Peukart's law.

Another factor is that longevity in a battery is affected by the depth of discharge, so that if you use more than 50% of the capacity of your battery bank, it will wear out prematurely.

This is not a but, but more my thinking. I have a DVM next to my bed that I check as I get up when it hit 12.4 or 12.3 I will switch over to the other battery. I now know I should have that many day left before I need to charge. I never take my battery to 12.2 volts which I think is 50% of battery.

Another factor is that a vehicle charging system will not charge a TT battery very well, because it is design for the TV battery and uses that battery to determine charge rate.

I agree with the first part, but have problems with using TV battery to determine charge rate. I think whole books have been written on alternator and battery charging. I am not going to write a book. The alternator will charge to the load placed on it. Battery take forever to charge from about 85% to 100%. Battery can be charged from low charge up to about 85% in couple hours. One problem I see in using the alternator in charging trailer battery is the long run of wire from the alternator. That is like having a battery with high internal resistance and Peukart's law cover that. Also the alternator needs to be run at a higher rpm then idle to be efficient. Bottom line when my batteries are low I will take anything I can get.

Anyone that drydocks extensively should have a good battery monitor to enhance the battery management and get the most out of the system. There are a variety of battery management systems out there, just search the forum. I have a Victron, but there are alot of others.
I have used XANTREX LINK 2000 BATTERY MONITOR. But in a small trailer like an A Frame I feel all I need is a DVM.
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Old 09-16-2013, 03:56 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by 1A Camper View Post
I am posting a reply in hope of adding information.

I have used XANTREX LINK 2000 BATTERY MONITOR. But in a small trailer like an A Frame I feel all I need is a DVM.
I agree with all your comments, not that you needed to hear that BUT, 12.2 volts might be a little low for 50% in my world, but at least you are measuring it. Depending on the load on the battery at the time of measure, I like to recharge at 12.4v measured after at least one hour of rest..
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Old 09-16-2013, 05:56 PM   #8
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Welcome to the forum, dts3204. You will love your AFrame for solo (or couple) dry camping. Set up and teardown is simple and quick, you can stow an amazing amount of gear inside for travel, and because the volume is small relative to a traditional pop up, they are easy to cool and heat. I use mine solo and can get set or struck faster than most of the tent campers in our group.

Remember to get LED bulbs. The inside and outside bulbs are on different bases, so you need four 921 base LED bulbs and 2 with the bayonet base. (Don't remember the number.)
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