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Old 11-05-2015, 12:36 PM   #11
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I am the original poster. . My tires on the a122 are indeed labeled 65 psi, cold. I checked the pressure this morning before hitching up. 46.5 in one, 48 in the other. So i need about 17 lbs or so in each. That's cold. So, I figure I will drive the 5 or 6 miles to the air pump. Check them again. My question.. even though the tires may warm up and show a higher pressure at the air pump, because of the drive... I still add 17 lbs. Right?
That's what I would do.
Fred W
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Old 11-05-2015, 02:07 PM   #12
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Me too.
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Old 11-08-2015, 03:11 PM   #13
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Ok. . Still having problems. Tried to bring the tires (2014 a122s) up to the correct psi. At the convenience store. . I kept getting varying pressure readings. The air compressor was working. I could feel the air coming out before I put it on the valve stem. But each time I checked I kept getting the same pressure reading and it never seemed to increase. This happened on both tires so I figured something was wrong with their air machine.

I went on to the campground. While there a friend checked the pressure again.. still about 15 to 20 lbs low. Before I left for home today,. Another camper brought by his portable air compressor and tried to add some air. Same thing happened as before. We could not add any air.

I'm wondering. . Since two different sources were unable to add air.. maybe something wrong with the valve stems on these tires? Do the nitro filled tires require a special adapter for the valve? And.. if the air compressor is unable to open the valve to fill.. maybe the pressure gauges are not getting a correct reading either. I'm bafulled?

Ani ideas?
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Old 11-09-2015, 12:54 PM   #14
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My limited experience with convenience store inflators is that many will not supply the 65 PSI needed for our tires. Small portable inflators people carry with them have the same problem despite the labeling claim of higher pressure. They can just bog down under the load and heat. At home I had a heavy duty 120V inflator that died after 10 years and replaced it with a light duty 2.5 gallon compressor that fills tires much faster. On the road, I go to the diesel side of truck stops to get air.

IDK if there is a special valve stem. As a practical matter there shouldn't be a special stem on trailer tires that prevents them from being filled up on demand. Special nitrogen filling is useless for our purposes, IMO. Besides regular air compressors provide 80% nitrogen anyway.
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Old 11-09-2015, 01:01 PM   #15
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Low pressure limited compressors?

Chuck,

It's been a long time since I've seen a convenience store compressor which will exceed 35 psi. Liability concerns, most likely--is it possible that somebody would fill their tire to the point of explosion while yakking nonstop on a cellphone? Similarly, the two "jump pack" jumpstart batteries I've had which included a compressor had fairly low limits and were essentially useless anyway in that they were on the order of a 20% service cycle and were far too easy to overheat and ruin. Perhaps your friend's compressor was a low-budget model having either limited pressure capability or was impaired due to having overheated.

Unfortunately, portable compressors are one of those items which "you get what you pay for". I have a good one now and it was $150 before loyalty discount, and still ran me $100. A tire store or a genuine service station is the only place I can assume to find pressure > 35 psi these days.

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Old 11-09-2015, 01:40 PM   #16
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Thanks. Very helpful. Does anyone have a recommendation for a compressor for home use? It would be used mostly just for my a122s tires and maybe blowing out the water lines on the camper. So I don't want to spend much money.. but I want it to work.
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Old 11-09-2015, 02:51 PM   #17
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A 120V inflator like this is sufficient and easy to carry and store. Otherwise go to your local orange or blue box home store and buy a smallish compressor.

At the low end, these are all made in China and are throw away products that cost less to replace than fix. So I think more about how the retailer stands behind the product than the manufactures service network or reputation for quality. The orange box (Home Depot) has done OK for me in after sale support for house brands.
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Old 11-09-2015, 03:18 PM   #18
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12 volt portable unit

Amazon.com: Smittybilt 2781 5.65 CFM Universal Air Compressor: Automotive

Pardon my lack of skills in posting a link. Shown above should link to a Smittybuilt 5.65 CFM 12 volt unit. It connects to any 12 volt battery (like your camper's battery) and the 5.65 cubic feet per minute (CFM) will fill a truck tire within a very few minutes. It comes in a carrying bag along with other fittings, a long coiled hose (20' or so?), and a decent length of power supply line with alligator clips for connection to the battery. I have it on board since I spend a lot of time off-pavement and well away from towns/repair services.

It is possible to overheat it, but it would take a long time. I did manage to fry a 2.7 CFM Smittybuilt a couple of years back. This one is $150 @ Amazon with free shipping. They're retailed at Four Wheel Parts Wholesalers online and in their stores, too. Chinese, as is pretty much everything these days, but mine has worked well. Back in Feb, I took it into a heavily-wooded area (where my truck wouldn't fit) along with a trolling motor battery in order to blow out a Kubota mini-tractor's fuel line, thus enabling the tractor to start, finish a job, and motor out under its own power. It's pretty handy having the portable unit and I would not want to be without one now.
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Old 11-09-2015, 04:33 PM   #19
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changing the topic and directing to Bluepill...

I've seen many posts about how to haul bikes on the back of these AFames...mosts of the posts say "don't do it". And now I see you are hauling a motorcycle. Wow.

Can you give us some photos and description of what you had to do to beef up the frame/bumper to accomplish that?
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Old 11-09-2015, 04:50 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chuck9997 View Post
I am the original poster. . My tires on the a122 are indeed labeled 65 psi, cold. I checked the pressure this morning before hitching up. 46.5 in one, 48 in the other. So i need about 17 lbs or so in each. That's cold. So, I figure I will drive the 5 or 6 miles to the air pump. Check them again. My question.. even though the tires may warm up and show a higher pressure at the air pump, because of the drive... I still add 17 lbs. Right?
Any tire operated at below 80% of recommended inflation pressure is considered in a “run flat” condition and should be dismounted and inspected for internal damages. In your case that’s anything below 52 psi.

That’s a tire industry and can be found in any tire safety publication about inflation pressures.
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