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Old 10-01-2012, 10:05 PM   #1
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I got an A128S and it was advertised to have 262 pounds tongue weight but when I place a scale under the tongue it was 420 pounds, the trailer was empty. I'm not sure if my weight reading is lower or higher, see the following link at the bottom of the page, it shows the correct way to measure tongue weight: http://amazon.curtmfg.com/index.cfm.25.html

I have manage to shift the weight by moving the propane tanks to the back storage, all the heavy stuff are stored to the rear of the trailer and front storage has light stuff in it. I carry 1-2 bikes on the front and with all that adjustment my tongue weight is about 340-380 pounds. My TV SAGS between 1.5 to 2.0 inches. Since I have the 1.25 inch receiver, I have to replace it to support WD. This will cost approx over $400 w/WD. Is it worth getting WD or is my TV ok to handle the trailer for future long trips?
Here is a pic of my rig carrying 1 bike: The sagging is not noticeableClick image for larger version

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I have traveled over 1000 km and the TV handling has been good, TV rated for 3500 pounds and 350 tongue weight, 2007 Pontiac Torrent w/trans cooler

I'm curious on your sag measurement of your TV with WD and without WD, please post, thanks.
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Old 10-01-2012, 10:51 PM   #2
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The key is to measure both rear sag and front lift. You shouldn't see more than about a half I ch lift in the fro t. More than than and you are losing breaking and steering control on your TV.

I have a 2 door wrangler and the short wheelbase combined with a higher than expected tongue weight made me fee that I had no choice bit to add WDH. I got a good deal through Advance Auto on my WDH Setup and spent about $300 to get what I needed.

I now tow with the confidence of a balanced distribution of the weight.

Looking at your pic, I think you are heavy in the rear suspension and likely light in the front. Measure unhitched and then hitched. Measured from the bottom of the center of the wheel well/fender both front and back.
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Old 10-02-2012, 12:10 AM   #3
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I am of the thought that if you want your Torrent to live a productive life, get the weight distributor to help adjust the load of your trailer. Why prematurely break down your rig if there is a preventive measure to protect it while towing?

Considering what you paid for your Torrent and what you paid for your trailer, 400- is a small amount to pay to enjoy your purchases for years to come. Most importantly, think of it for what it is, a safety issue. Clearly the tongue weight on the Torrent is overloaded by a significant amount - invest in the proper equipment and eliminate the instability of your vehicle by adding a WD to your RV wish list...in the bigger picture, its a small amount to consider the other outcomes of NOT buying one.
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Old 10-02-2012, 12:46 AM   #4
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I suspect my TV is similar to yours (3500# tow weight) and my AFrame is as well (I have the cargo rack while you have the enclosed storage bin).

I haul often with two bikes and the cargo bin full of wood and a cooler of beverages and ice. As I considered the WDH, I just decided to do it and be done with it (I got an Equalizer). I feel more comfortable and towing is rock steady even with that much weight (propane up front too). No ass-drag on the car.

I say get one and then you don't need to worry about your numbers so much, especially if you end up front-loading the storage bin. Plus you can stop having to move your propane around.
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Old 10-02-2012, 07:23 AM   #5
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You need to check your manual and see if they mention WD hitch setup and max weight with that. Usually there is a max tongue weight with and without.

On my Suburban it's 500 without and 1000 lbs with.

I doubt that you are risking the rear hitch falling off, but your handling could definately be improved. Do you have any sway issues? Sounds like not since you have plenty of tongue weight. Be cautious for that as you move more weight to the rear.

Another alternative is to install some Timbrens in the rear. These are rubber helper springs that replace your bump stop (you can search on here for lots of posts about them) They are cheap and would help with your ride height. They won't allow you to run overloaded though. PM me if you want more details on these.

Good luck.
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Old 10-02-2012, 08:02 AM   #6
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Is the Torrent a 'full-framed' vehicle or is it a 'uni-body' vehicle? And my second dumb question is - can you use a WDH on a uni-body vehicle without worry about the additional stress eventually ripping out the hitch mounts?

I ask these questions only because I do not know the answers, but to me I would think adding a WDH to a vehicle that does not have a full-frame mounted hitch would be a bad thing. Back when we were considering a Santa Fe these were concerns brought to my attention.

Thoughts?
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Old 10-02-2012, 09:11 AM   #7
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If I am not mistaken, the 1-1/4" receiver you have is a Class II hitch which actually only has a tongue weight max of 300, not 350. As per Forest River specs, the A-frame trailers require a Class III hitch, which is the 2" receiver (and 350 lb tongue weight). Spend the money and equip your little SUV properly so that you can save youself mechanical issues down the road. You may not feel the load is too much for your rig, since it pulled ok - but the stress on your axles may reflect a different story.

One can not predict when something will fail, and at that point it is usually more expensive to repair.

Why not ask the Pontiac dealer what their thoughts are?
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Old 10-02-2012, 09:52 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ko777 View Post
I got an A128S and it was advertised to have 262 pounds tongue weight but when I place a scale under the tongue it was 420 pounds, the trailer was empty. I'm not sure if my weight reading is lower or higher, see the following link at the bottom of the page, it shows the correct way to measure tongue weight: Determining Vehicle Towing Capacity & Trailer Weight | Hitch Info
The method shown is an accurate way to measure the tongue weight if done correctly. It is not too surprising that a 262 lb. listed tongue weight is 420 lbs ready to go down the road.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ko777 View Post
I have manage to shift the weight by moving the propane tanks to the back storage, all the heavy stuff are stored to the rear of the trailer and front storage has light stuff in it. I carry 1-2 bikes on the front and with all that adjustment my tongue weight is about 340-380 pounds.
Moving the weight around will work to lessen the tongue weight, but be careful that the tongue weight stays at least about 12% of the total trailer weight to keep sway at bay. 340-380 lbs. should be good if the total trailer weight is in the 3000 lb. range or under.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ko777 View Post
My TV SAGS between 1.5 to 2.0 inches. Since I have the 1.25 inch receiver, I have to replace it to support WD. This will cost approx over $400 w/WD. Is it worth getting WD or is my TV ok to handle the trailer for future long trips?
The small receiver is concerning. Those are usually used on Class I and II receivers. Typically, if indeed the receiver is a Class II, they are rated to tow 3500 lbs., but usually restricted to a 300 lb. tongue weight. A Class I has only a 200 lb. tongue weight rating. There should be a sticker on the hitch stating the weight limits.

Trailer Hitch Class FAQ

Quote:
Originally Posted by ko777 View Post
Here is a pic of my rig carrying 1 bike: The sagging is not noticeableAttachment 20124
I have traveled over 1000 km and the TV handling has been good, TV rated for 3500 pounds and 350 tongue weight, 2007 Pontiac Torrent w/trans cooler.
The sagging does not look to awful bad....but it is there. Adding 340 - 380 lbs. behind the rear axle really puts a lot of weight on that axle. A trip across some scales would give you an idea of how close you are to your rear axle weight rating.....that figure should be posted on the driver's door. A lightweight WDH would really help level up your vehicle, and should make it drive much better. But, if you have a Class II hitch, they are generally not recommended to use with WDHs......as well as Pontiac might state somewhere in the manual not to use a WDH.
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Old 10-02-2012, 07:05 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by wincrasher View Post
Another alternative is to install some Timbrens in the rear. These are rubber helper springs that replace your bump stop (you can search on here for lots of posts about them) They are cheap and would help with your ride height. They won't allow you to run overloaded though. PM me if you want more details on these.

Good luck.
I 2nd the Timbrens. I have them on my Xterra.
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Old 10-02-2012, 07:12 PM   #10
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Timbrens do nothing to put weight back on the front axle, and do nothing to increase the rear axle weight rating.
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