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Old 01-13-2012, 10:38 AM   #1
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Condensation on windows

I know I may beating a dead horse here but, is there anything that can be done to reduce the condensation that is created on the single pane widows of a camper in the winter? I live in Georgia and the moisture content in the air is high even during the winter. I know when hot or warm air meets cold surfaces there will be some moisture but, I'm afraid the amount I have here will cause me problems down the road with mole and sidewall rot. Any suggestions other than moving to a warmer climate would be appreciated.
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Old 01-13-2012, 10:42 AM   #2
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There are a few things you can do.
Leave the roof vents open an inch or two. You can also leave a couple of windows slightly opened.
Air movement is important, so either buy a small fan or run your AC fan to help with that.
You can also purchase dehumidifiers.

Hope this helps you.
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Old 01-13-2012, 11:07 AM   #3
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Thanks for the info. I've tried electric heaters that move the air and have notice only the lower section of the windows having and issue. The gas heat really creates a large amount of condensation but, it also creates more heat. I tried the chemical buckets placing two large one in my Flagstaff 30WRKSS but hey can't keep up. This is our first camper and next time I will look for better windows.
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Old 01-13-2012, 11:52 AM   #4
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Actually your tt's gas furnace doesn't produce the moisture your experiencing. Most of it comes from our breathing and our water usage, such as the shower.
Which reminds me, always use the bathroom vent fan when showering.

I use a couple of the buckets too, but only when the tt's not being used.
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Old 01-13-2012, 12:09 PM   #5
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I know this isnt a 100% answer. This is what we are experiencing in ID with temps dropping to 10 degrees at night. We run a dehumidifier 24 hours a day and get roughly 1/2 gallon of water in a 24 hour period to empty. We get up every morning with condensation on the windows. Right after the first cup of coffee one of us opens the curtains, blinds, and turns on the fan to circulate the air. We also wipe the windows down to get rid of the large amount of moisture. Day time temp is held at 70 degrees for comfort and to keep from freezing up we hold the night time temp to 65. I think the dehumidifier might be a good idea. I won't give ours up anyway. The other thing we do, as suggested by grhodes50, is shower with the vent open and fan on. The temp dropping to 10 and sometimes to 0 at night I'm sure is what is condensing the moisture in the air. We try to keep our humidity to 30% and below but is hard to do with the outside and inside temps.

Sorry we couldn't give you the 100% solution. We feel we have only a 70% solution at best but keep working at it. I do worry about the condensation, that is the reason for us doing so much to try to keep it dry in here. BTW we only have a 27 ft trailer so it might be easier for us than larger trailers.

Best Regards,

Hob
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Old 01-13-2012, 12:51 PM   #6
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Thanks Guys, I thought this was limited to just TT but about a week ago I was camping and there was a very expensive motor home next to me and there unit had the same problem. I grew up in house that had no insulation and gas heat. I remember the windows and wall sweating during the winter and the water on the glass would sometime freeze on the inside...when spring came we had to wash the walls because of the yellows stains the gas left on the walls. Thanks again for all of your help.
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Old 01-13-2012, 05:35 PM   #7
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I run the exhaust fan above the stove if my furnace is on. No moisture since I started that.
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Old 01-13-2012, 05:43 PM   #8
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Exhaust Fan

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vols View Post
I run the exhaust fan above the stove if my furnace is on. No moisture since I started that.
My problem only occurs after we go to bed. Wish I could figure out a way to turn on and off the exhaust fan over the stove while we are in bed. I'm way too old to stay up all night to turn it on and off when the furnace turns on and off.

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Old 01-13-2012, 05:58 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vols View Post
I run the exhaust fan above the stove if my furnace is on. No moisture since I started that.
I know that I'm a real n00b here, not having run the furnace yet
on our recently purchased TT, but I see again and again the
idea that the moisture in the trailer is from the furnace. (from
the fact that burning propane generates water)

I thought that the combustion chamber of the furnace was sealed
off from the internal air - meaning that the combustion products
like CO, CO2, H2O, etc would go out the exhaust and not mingle
with the internal air. If that is correct, how could water from the
propane combustion be getting inside the trailer? If water gets in,
would not gasses like CO and CO2 get in also?

I must be missing something. Be nice to find out now before
I start using the furnace!!!

cheers,
johnd
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Old 01-13-2012, 06:07 PM   #10
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It has nothing to do with the furnace. Its due to hot or warm air on one side of the window and cold air on the other side. Same thing happens when you breath on a mirror...
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