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Old 08-12-2018, 10:05 AM   #1
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Do you crack open windows when cooking?

We are into our 8th year of RVing. 29 states on our camping map. We bought our 2008 TT used in 2010. The previous owner taught us to crack the window near the stove while cooking to add "ventilation". Sounded reasonable, so we have until recently. Decided the range hood ventilation fan external exhaust vent was essentially the same thing as a cracked window with a cracked open roof vent nearby for an "intake". Our Suburban manual does not mention ventilation at all in the safety section. Our "The RV-er's Bible" by Baker and Baker (1997) does instruct the RV-er to crack open a window when heating and cooking. I quote page 264: "Ventilation saves live. Crack the windows open a bit when heating the RV with propane or solid fuel or preparing meals."
What are other folks doing while cooking? What do you recommend?
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Old 08-12-2018, 10:16 AM   #2
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We always crack the window too. The vent hood fan draws the fresh air in and exhausts out the fumes quicker imo..
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Old 08-12-2018, 10:24 AM   #3
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If the range hood doesn't blow outside and just recirculates in your face, don't bother turning it on.
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Old 08-12-2018, 10:35 AM   #4
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We crack the window and turn on the vent hood (make sure the cover outside is unlatched so it can free swing, otherwise, yep, it just blows into your face inside the TT). It should be latched for travel.
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Old 08-12-2018, 11:14 AM   #5
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Cracking a window near the stove is more efficient than relying on roof vents for "intake" air. Heat rises. Open a window and a roof vent, normal convection currents will exchange air. Open a window and use the range hood (with outside "flap" free) and fresh air comes in with hot air being exhausted in a short distance. Real important when using AC.

If I don't keep a window open near the stove, with range hood fan on, my smoke detector reminds me in short order. Especially if using the oven.
Cheap detectors (what else would you expect from the factory) are ionization types and give false alarms from just hot metal of the oven. Keep forgetting to change it for an upgraded model.
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Old 08-12-2018, 11:50 AM   #6
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We don't have a vent hood.

So we crack a window, turn on the roof vent.... and occasionally remove the smoke detector battery if we're cooking something smokey (immediately put the battery back in when done cooking). The roof vent takes out the smoke or water vapor and cooking smells.
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Old 08-12-2018, 12:21 PM   #7
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Two reasons:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Puma26RLSS View Post
We are into our 8th year of RVing. 29 states on our camping map. We bought our 2008 TT used in 2010. The previous owner taught us to crack the window near the stove while cooking to add "ventilation". Sounded reasonable, so we have until recently. Decided the range hood ventilation fan external exhaust vent was essentially the same thing as a cracked window with a cracked open roof vent nearby for an "intake". Our Suburban manual does not mention ventilation at all in the safety section. Our "The RV-er's Bible" by Baker and Baker (1997) does instruct the RV-er to crack open a window when heating and cooking. I quote page 264: "Ventilation saves live. Crack the windows open a bit when heating the RV with propane or solid fuel or preparing meals."
What are other folks doing while cooking? What do you recommend?
The carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide that are produced from a a few minutes with a range burner are minimal.

BUT the other byproduct of burning propane is H2O (water). Water vapor is also produced as steam from the product you are cooking. We often run the vent just to keep the inside humidity down.

Propane is a simple molecule, C3H8. That is, three Carbon atoms and eight Hydrogen atoms clumped together. When you burn (oxidize) propane, the C's go to oxides of Carbon (CO and CO2) and the H's go to water (H2O).

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Old 08-12-2018, 12:42 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Larry-NC View Post
The carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide that are produced from a a few minutes with a range burner are minimal.

BUT the other byproduct of burning propane is H2O (water). Water vapor is also produced as steam from the product you are cooking. We often run the vent just to keep the inside humidity down.

Propane is a simple molecule, C3H8. That is, three Carbon atoms and eight Hydrogen atoms clumped together. When you burn (oxidize) propane, the C's go to oxides of Carbon (CO and CO2) and the H's go to water (H2O).

Larry
If the flame at the burner is blue, the amount of CO produced is negligible. This is why stove top and oven burners don't require separate vents unless one needs to get rid of the water vapor.

Now if the flame is turning yellow, that's a clear sign of incomplete combustion which produces CO in greater quantities. Look for plugged air intakes for the burners when this occurs.
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Old 08-12-2018, 12:55 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TitanMike View Post
Cracking a window near the stove is more efficient than relying on roof vents for "intake" air. Heat rises. Open a window and a roof vent, normal convection currents will exchange air. Open a window and use the range hood (with outside "flap" free) and fresh air comes in with hot air being exhausted in a short distance. Real important when using AC.

If I don't keep a window open near the stove, with range hood fan on, my smoke detector reminds me in short order. Especially if using the oven.
Cheap detectors (what else would you expect from the factory) are ionization types and give false alarms from just hot metal of the oven. Keep forgetting to change it for an upgraded model.
TitanMike can you explain the logic for using the range hood and opening a window when using AC please
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Old 08-12-2018, 01:21 PM   #10
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Open the window

I have my fantastic fan on and crack a window. I also do most of my cooking outside on a griddle or smokey joe. I rarely cook inside and have never used the oven. I do that at home not when camping.
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