Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-04-2013, 10:43 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 27
Propane connector

I have a new 2013 Flagstaff V-Lite with the external propane hose connection to connect an outside grill, etc. My question is what type of fitting do I need to connect a turkey fryer which uses a threaded male fitting? Thanks in advance.
__________________

__________________
Road Home
Chuck & Linda
Olive Branch, MS
2013 Flagstaff V-Lite 30WRLS
2013 F150 EcoBoost/Max Trailering Pkg.
Road Home is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2013, 01:15 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
KMP44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Central New York
Posts: 1,025
Quote:
Originally Posted by Road Home View Post
I have a new 2013 Flagstaff V-Lite with the external propane hose connection to connect an outside grill, etc. My question is what type of fitting do I need to connect a turkey fryer which uses a threaded male fitting? Thanks in advance.
Not sure how your fryer is setup, but ours (which we use to steam clams rather than fry turkeys) has a combined pressure regulator and flow adjustment knob. This presents a problem, because even if you get it hooked up with the right fittings, your line pressure from the camper has already been reduced by the regulator at the tank. The regulator on the fryer then further reduces the flow, and your oil won't ever get hot enough to cook anything. And you can't remove the regulator on the fryer because then you have no way to control the flow to adjust the burner. Because of this "double regulator" issue, using anything other than an rv grill that was designed to connect to that low pressure connection on the camper can be rather difficult.

One way to make this work without carrying an extra tank around with you is to get a T or Y fitting that connects to one of the trailer's propane tanks and then maybe an extension hose for some extra reach and connect the fryer to that. Then you have the correct pressure going into the regulator on the fryer.

HMM - sure could go for a turkey sandwich - maybe a little cajun fried turkey, and some cranberry sauce too.
__________________

__________________


2017 F-250
2013 Rockwood Roo 23 IKSS
KMP44 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2013, 07:03 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 29
The regulator on the fryer is looking for a certain downstream pressure, not upstream. If the pressure is lower on the upstream side, that will not affect the downstream pressure UNLESS the inlet pressure is lower than the setpoint for the downstream side.

A regulator is not just a simple flow restriction. It will adjust depending on what it senses as the downstream pressure. If it's too low, it'll open up. If it's too high, it'll close.

To the OP, this has been discussed before: LP Hose extension?
__________________
abednego is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2013, 07:13 PM   #4
rip
Senior Member
 
rip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 343
This web dealer (Tejas Smokers) can help with low pressure fittings.

Gas Quick Connect Hose / Gas Quick Connects Gas Hose Systems

You may be able to call them and ask more questions about what you are trying to do.
__________________
Ray
+ 2013 Rockwood Windjammer 2809W
+ 2008 GMC Sierra Crew Z71
+ 2002 Ford F-250 7.3L 4X4
rip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2013, 11:27 AM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 27
Thank you for your help. I will contact Texas Smokers and see what I can do. I don't want to carry an additional propane tank just for the turkey fryer. I will report back as to what I find.
__________________
Road Home
Chuck & Linda
Olive Branch, MS
2013 Flagstaff V-Lite 30WRLS
2013 F150 EcoBoost/Max Trailering Pkg.
Road Home is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2013, 11:26 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
KMP44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Central New York
Posts: 1,025
Quote:
Originally Posted by abednego View Post
The regulator on the fryer is looking for a certain downstream pressure, not upstream. If the pressure is lower on the upstream side, that will not affect the downstream pressure UNLESS the inlet pressure is lower than the setpoint for the downstream side.

A regulator is not just a simple flow restriction. It will adjust depending on what it senses as the downstream pressure. If it's too low, it'll open up. If it's too high, it'll close.
There is no "sensor" in a regulator. It is a mechanical device that controls the flow, and the orifice is sized based on having a high pressure on the inlet side.

I know for a fact that if you use that connection for a grill, the burner adjustment knob still adjusts the flow, but the gas flow coming through the second regulator on the grill is so low you can't cook on the grill.

I'm not sure exactly how the fryer's combination regulator/adjustment knob is constructed, but I think it is likely that you will have the same problem with reduced flow when connecting it to the low pressure on the tt quick connect.

So who's going to spring for the parts to cennect it up and try it?
__________________


2017 F-250
2013 Rockwood Roo 23 IKSS
KMP44 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 06:10 PM   #7
rip
Senior Member
 
rip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 343
I was fortunate, guys, the grill I purchased had a regulator on the tank end instead of the grill end for its connector hose. I could replace it and connect at the grill end with a low pressure quick connect hose. I did not have a grill-side regulator to deal with.
__________________
Ray
+ 2013 Rockwood Windjammer 2809W
+ 2008 GMC Sierra Crew Z71
+ 2002 Ford F-250 7.3L 4X4
rip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2013, 12:17 AM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by KMP44 View Post
There is no "sensor" in a regulator. It is a mechanical device that controls the flow, and the orifice is sized based on having a high pressure on the inlet side.
It is a mechanical device that manipulates flow based on pressure, but it is controlling pressure, and indirectly flow. Any argument to the contrary is ignorant.

The "sensor" is a diaphragm and a spring. The two work in conjunction, based on a tension set on the spring by a screw. As the controlled pressure changes, this forces the diaphragm to move against the spring, which moves a plug in and out of a port, which then allows more or less flow to build or reduce the controlled pressure.

If it was simply an orifice to allow flow, then a needle valve would suffice.

The orifice size is based on the maximum flow desired by the customer/client/end user/grill manufacturer. The orifice size has NOTHING to do with the desired downstream pressure. It is often referred to as a "port", not an orifice, but an orifice is a common term that most laypeople will understand. Yes, the pressure figures in to the sizing of the port but only as it relates to the density of the gas at the upstream pressure. As the source pressure rises, the needed port, to achieve the required flow, will be smaller of course.

Propane regulators do not have any user adjustable parts that I am aware of, so there's no adjustability of the downstream pressure, which is what the regulator is controlling. It's set at the factory to prevent end-users from possibly overpressuring the end device.

If you like I could link you to a cutaway diagram of a regulator so you can see this for yourself.

You are correct in that the adjustment knob on the grill changes the flow. There is no device to control pressure because you can't; the gas flows to atmospheric pressure. But the upstream pressure on that knob must be kept constant to ensure that the flow through the grill knob is constant. If it is not kept constant you cannot keep a consistent flame. That's what a regulator does. Maintains pressure.
__________________
abednego is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2013, 02:33 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
KMP44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Central New York
Posts: 1,025
Quote:
Originally Posted by abednego View Post
It is a mechanical device that manipulates flow based on pressure, but it is controlling pressure, and indirectly flow. Any argument to the contrary is ignorant.

The "sensor" is a diaphragm and a spring. The two work in conjunction, based on a tension set on the spring by a screw. As the controlled pressure changes, this forces the diaphragm to move against the spring, which moves a plug in and out of a port, which then allows more or less flow to build or reduce the controlled pressure.

If it was simply an orifice to allow flow, then a needle valve would suffice.

The orifice size is based on the maximum flow desired by the customer/client/end user/grill manufacturer. The orifice size has NOTHING to do with the desired downstream pressure. It is often referred to as a "port", not an orifice, but an orifice is a common term that most laypeople will understand. Yes, the pressure figures in to the sizing of the port but only as it relates to the density of the gas at the upstream pressure. As the source pressure rises, the needed port, to achieve the required flow, will be smaller of course.

Propane regulators do not have any user adjustable parts that I am aware of, so there's no adjustability of the downstream pressure, which is what the regulator is controlling. It's set at the factory to prevent end-users from possibly overpressuring the end device.

If you like I could link you to a cutaway diagram of a regulator so you can see this for yourself.

You are correct in that the adjustment knob on the grill changes the flow. There is no device to control pressure because you can't; the gas flows to atmospheric pressure. But the upstream pressure on that knob must be kept constant to ensure that the flow through the grill knob is constant. If it is not kept constant you cannot keep a consistent flame. That's what a regulator does. Maintains pressure.
Appreciate the enlightenment. Feel free to hook one up and prove me wrong - if you run through 2 regulators, the "port" in the second one will not allow gas flow to effectively cook anything.
__________________


2017 F-250
2013 Rockwood Roo 23 IKSS
KMP44 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2013, 03:51 PM   #10
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 29
My friend, I have no need to run the experiment you describe.

Here's what I'm thinking. Based on what I know about regulators, the 2nd regulator will be wide open, attempting to raise the downstream pressure. There would be a minor flow restriction simply due to the size of the port, but it would not restrict the flow due to its operation. Perhaps that's what you were trying to tell me?

If I ever get the correct hose to go from my quick connect to my grill it wouldn't have a regulator on it because it's not needed. But if I see someone with a quick-connect to regulator to threaded disposable propane connector then I'll see if I can borrow it.

I am curious tho, why did you copy the entire contents of a post immediately above yours??

edit: For what it's worth, I wasn't arguing whether or not you'd get enough flow to the grill. I just took exception to what I perceived to be a misunderstanding of how a regulator works. I buy spec and buy commercial regulators for use in the oil and gas industry so I have a bit of knowledge of their function.
__________________

__________________
abednego is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
propane

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:09 PM.