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Old 06-23-2015, 02:01 PM   #11
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Are you sure they didn't overfill the tank when they refilled it for you? There has to be an "empty" portion above the gas level for it to produce gas from the liquid propane.
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Old 06-23-2015, 04:56 PM   #12
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An internal tank probably has an electric shutoff solenoid in the circuit. It's run off of the propane detector and is a safety feature that shuts off the propane when the detector goes into an "alarm" state. The coil in the solenoid on my 2011 Georgetown 327DS shorted and blew the fuse protecting the propane detector. Of course, the fuse wasn't in the fuse panel. The propane detector is fed directly off of the house battery's + terminal and has its own 5A inline fuse in the battery compartment. (Yes, locating that fuse was an interesting chore.)

I discovered that the solenoid is NOT a replaceable part! The only way to get one is to purchase an entire new propane detector kit which includes the solenoid. Unfortunately, the new solenoid had different sized fittings than the original. Fortunately, the RV mobile technician who was installing it at the campground I was staying at brought a full set of adapters and had one that fit. My breakdown insurance also covered the entire cost of the repair, over $700.

I also discovered that the original solenoid was rated to draw 1A at 12V. This means that having the propane turned on was drawing 24AH/day from the house batteries. The replacement solenoid is rated at 0.5AH, requiring only 12AH/day, a desirable improvement. Since my rig was only one year old when this happened, I still had four years life left on the original propane detector. The new one that came with the kit has been put in storage (it has a 10 year shelf life) and will be installed at the end of the original one's service life.

I also took the service technician's recommendation and installed a switch in the power line between the propane detector and the solenoid. This lets me, when I don't need it, shut off the propane from inside the RV.

Phil
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Old 06-23-2015, 06:14 PM   #13
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My Trilogy has an electrical shutoff close to the fill port for the 100 lb tank.
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Old 06-23-2015, 11:10 PM   #14
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I had a related situation in February. After much pain, the dealer determined that the tank hadn't been purged before it was filled the first time. This caused the regulator to freeze after an initial 10-15 minutes of running the furnace. Propane cools rapidly as it expands (often below freezing), which caused the moisture to freeze in the regulator. The dealer paid to purge and refill the tank...which takes three to four days. Since the EPA won't allow propane to be dumped into the air, it had to be burned off via a special 10' stand that produced a large flame burning off the propane.
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Old 06-24-2015, 10:57 AM   #15
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Had the same issue and it me nuts truing to determine the issue. Tow full tanks, one would work and the other not. Wasn't even a year old and then found out after carefully switching the tanks that it was the regulator.
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Old 06-27-2015, 01:36 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pmsherman View Post
I also took the service technician's recommendation and installed a switch in the power line between the propane detector and the solenoid. This lets me, when I don't need it, shut off the propane from inside the RV.

Phil
I like that idea, going to have to look into that. I think I have room in the switch panel by the door to fit another small switch.

Jim
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