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Old 02-11-2015, 01:23 PM   #51
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No worries at the fuel pump. Gasoline fumes sink to the ground, and the fridge's flame is 2-3 feet off the ground. Also gasoline fumes have a narrow flammability range.
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Old 02-11-2015, 01:54 PM   #52
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Originally Posted by techntrek View Post
No worries at the fuel pump. Gasoline fumes sink to the ground, and the fridge's flame is 2-3 feet off the ground. Also gasoline fumes have a narrow flammability range.

And let's not forget that your refrigerator is usually pretty far from the pump. Like 30' away kind of away. It's going to take an awful lot of fumes to fill the area enough to get ignitable gas fumes 3' off the ground 30' away from the pump.

However, it's not technically impossible, so if you hop out of your rig and the place reeks of gas, I wouldn't want to stick around.

If you are going to shut it off, remember that you need to shut the fridge off, not just the propane. Even with the propane off the DSI will still try to spark as long as the fridge is turned on and you haven't gone to a lockout state. The spark is what you need to watch out for (again only if the gas fumes can reach ignitable concentrations).






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Old 02-11-2015, 07:08 PM   #53
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Always on while traveling.
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Old 02-11-2015, 07:23 PM   #54
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Always on when travelling. Leave it in Auto unless we are not using it.
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Old 02-11-2015, 07:55 PM   #55
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Always travel with the fridge on. If the pilot gets blown out, the thermocouple will not keep the gas valve open.
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Old 02-11-2015, 08:53 PM   #56
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I forgot to mention that most vehicles on the road now have on-board fume recovery systems (which is why they are being phased out on gas pumps in some states).

We leave our fridge on while traveling. We had trouble with gas and electric mode on a trip out west on our prior TT, multiple 90-100 F days all day on the road, threw out the milk and meat twice. No way would I leave it off intentionally.
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Old 02-11-2015, 08:53 PM   #57
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If I'm on a long trip I keep my fridge on propane, for a short trip I use ac through an inverter and solar panel.
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Old 02-11-2015, 10:47 PM   #58
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Once the fridge is cold, we can go all morning and only lose 5 deg or so. So we don't run it on the road.

I have a wireless temperature sender I stick in the fridge and I can monitor the temp while on the road.
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Old 02-14-2015, 04:18 PM   #59
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I've run my fridges on propane while traveling for 20 years. Everyone I've ever known and camped with also gas. Never had or heard of a problem. We frequently open the fridge while traveling to get water or make sandwiches.


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Old 02-14-2015, 04:35 PM   #60
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Gas vs. diesel pump vapors...?

Hmmmmm...interesting and smart advice actually! However, I was thinking that you are taking caution at a "gas" (-oline...?) pump? Mark me if I'm wrong or someone chime in please. So, am wondering if turning off the frige and LP flame is still necessary at a truck stop that delivers only diesel fuel at it's pumps? If so, then not necessary there? I'm not a petroleum engineer but wonder if diesel vapors are as volatile as gasoline vapors are BOUND to be??

I know it wouldn't take much to induce an explosion with gasoline vapors but have doubts about how diesel fumes tend to spread and how quickly...

Anybody?
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