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Old 02-14-2015, 03:09 PM   #1
lmopaulin
 
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Leak in Slide Out Dinette Window

This problem is probably already out there somewhere, but I'm an new user and upon doing a search was overwhelmed by the many threads that came up. So here it goes. I'm going to get as detailed as possible hoping someone can help.

My husband and I own a 2009 Rockwood Forest River Ultra-Lite 2304. We store it outside on a level gravel pad from the beginning of May to the end of October and store it inside during the winter. We have one slide out for the dinette area. It does not have a topper. We typically keep the slide out open in the summer when it's on the gravel pad.

This year while on a trip I noticed a rust colored streak down the shade covering the window on the long side of the slide out (there are two small side windows on the slide out as well). I thought one of us had accidentally sprayed some coffee or pop on the shade so I cleaned it up. Unfortunately, the stain later returned. We realized there must be a leak somewhere. Upon examination, I could see water coming in from around the window. I carry rag towels in the trailer and I'm glad I do because it started to rain and the leakage accelerated. With time, it saturated the towel I put down on the dinette table (which was down at the time) and soaked the carpet under the table, part of one of the dinette seat cushions and the carpet in the storage area under the seat. After that, I kept rag towels down everywhere to ward off further water damage. Ironically, there are cabinets above the window but they are unaffected by the leak.

When we returned home, we did another inspection of the window area and found nothing loose or at all suspect. Both of us also took a look a the top of the slide out and the seal. The seal looked good but the sealant coating applied by the manufacturer to the outer edge of the slide out was done so sloppily that it would be almost impossible to detect any crack or leak (the trailer roof is just as bad!). My husband tried putting a new some sealant around the edges of the slide out, but when we ran a hose on it afterward, the leak was still there. We also tried keeping the slide out pulled in...still leaked.

I am very concerned as we are contemplating buying a new rig in the next year or so and hope to trade this one in and get a decent price for it as it is in good condition otherwise. Consequently, we need to get this resolved ASAP, especially because I fear rot is already taking place and I can see multiplying dollar signs to fix this problem.

Has anyone out there experienced a similar problem? If so, what did you do? Can we fix it ourselves or do we have to take it somewhere? Is there any way to detect rotting? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. THANKS!
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Old 02-15-2015, 02:53 PM   #2
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You may have to take the whole window out to find the leak, it is not hard to take out and put back, just be sure to have dicor tape to seal the window with.


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Old 02-15-2015, 03:47 PM   #3
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Fix the leak as soon as you can as you will have delamination before rot becomes an issue. You can find a window leak very easily if you have an air compressor with a blower nozzle. Mix up a soap water solution and one of you be outside "painting" the solution around the window frame where it meets the slideout wall and also where the glass is inserted into the frame. The other person needs to be inside with the air compressor and using the blower nozzle to direct the pressurized air around the window and frame. If you see a bubble outside, there's your leak. If you don't see any bubbles, you then need to remove your window coverings and then take out the inside window frame (this is the pieces with the screws all around the perimeter). Do not remove the frame fully until someone is outside pushing on the window to keep it in-place. Repeat with the soap and air testing and you should find the leak. If it's small, you might be able to just caulk it. If not, follow below.

If you don't have a compressor, just remove the window coverings and take off the inside frame with someone outside holding the window so it doesn't tumble out. Then gently work the window out by pushing to the person outside. The person outside may need a plastic putty knife to get up under the window flange in order to free the butyl tape and caulk holding the window in-place. Once out, you need to clean off all of the old butyl tape and caulking from the window frame and slideout wall around the opening. Put new butyl tape around the window and set it in the opening and hold it while the other person reinstalls the inside frame. Tighten the inside frame uniformly taking down all screws a little at a time. If it's a cooler day, let the window sit a day or two and then retighten the screws and then go outside and remove the squeezed out butyl tape and run a clean bead of caulk around. Job done.

Tape:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Good Caulk Sealant:
http://www.amazon.com/Geocel-28127V-...sin=B003VAWQYY
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Old 02-15-2015, 04:18 PM   #4
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Thumbs up Great answers!

Thank you both so much! I can't wait until we can get the camper out and see if your suggestions resolve the issue.
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Old 02-17-2015, 03:34 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geotex1 View Post
Fix the leak as soon as you can as you will have delamination before rot becomes an issue. You can find a window leak very easily if you have an air compressor with a blower nozzle. Mix up a soap water solution and one of you be outside "painting" the solution around the window frame where it meets the slideout wall and also where the glass is inserted into the frame. The other person needs to be inside with the air compressor and using the blower nozzle to direct the pressurized air around the window and frame. If you see a bubble outside, there's your leak. If you don't see any bubbles, you then need to remove your window coverings and then take out the inside window frame (this is the pieces with the screws all around the perimeter). Do not remove the frame fully until someone is outside pushing on the window to keep it in-place. Repeat with the soap and air testing and you should find the leak. If it's small, you might be able to just caulk it. If not, follow below.

If you don't have a compressor, just remove the window coverings and take off the inside frame with someone outside holding the window so it doesn't tumble out. Then gently work the window out by pushing to the person outside. The person outside may need a plastic putty knife to get up under the window flange in order to free the butyl tape and caulk holding the window in-place. Once out, you need to clean off all of the old butyl tape and caulking from the window frame and slideout wall around the opening. Put new butyl tape around the window and set it in the opening and hold it while the other person reinstalls the inside frame. Tighten the inside frame uniformly taking down all screws a little at a time. If it's a cooler day, let the window sit a day or two and then retighten the screws and then go outside and remove the squeezed out butyl tape and run a clean bead of caulk around. Job done.

Tape:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Good Caulk Sealant:
http://www.amazon.com/Geocel-28127V-...sin=B003VAWQYY
THAT is the way to fix a leak and never have it return. Excellent write up.
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Old 03-05-2015, 02:29 PM   #6
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Another option to pressurize the cabin I read about recently, and maybe on this forum: Someone wrote an article as to how he took an electric leaf blower, ran the nozzle up under the lid of an overhead vent, closed the lid as much as he could without the lid resting on the vibrating blower vent then duct taped around the opening remaining of the vent. He turned the leaf blower on low and this pressurized the cabin while he used Windex (soapy water will do) to find the leak around a window. He found the same problem I had with a previous TT--the foam type seal they put on the RV siding before placing the window into place had been placed so that the ends met at the top. This tape will shrink just a bit after installation so there was about 1/16" gap at the top of mine. Yes, I had to completely remove the window, clean all mating surfaces, re-install the window with proper sealant and all was well. I like the blower idea
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