Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-19-2016, 11:45 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
97flhtcui's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Austin Texas
Posts: 154
A/C temp outside vs inside

It was 115 degrees for the high in San tan valley today. With both a/c's on constantly the inside temp was 92 deg. No carport or shade to cover the Rv. That is a 23 deg difference between inside and outside. Before I put slide toppers on we had a 17 degree difference when our high was 111. We should be able to do even better when we get our thermopane Windows installed. FYI for those that feel you a/c is not cold enough.
__________________

__________________
2011 Ford F-250 6.2l gas 373 rear end
2015 Cedar Creek 34RL
97flhtcui is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2016, 08:43 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Penfield
Posts: 176
Question (well, more of a statement) ... I thought A/C didn't work very well in AZ due to the dry air. Isn't that why most houses use a swamp cooler kind of thing?

I'm just asking because I don't know and I'd like to.
__________________

__________________
John M
2013 GMC Sierra 2500DH CC, 4x4, D/A
2016 Forest River Vengeance 25V TT/TH
johnm1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2016, 08:44 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
dieselguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Kansas
Posts: 806
As far as RV's and hot weather go ... if you can get a 20 degree differential between outside and inside temps ... you're doing well. Sitting in the shade ... maybe a bit more. I have a friend with a dark color full body paint SOB ... it makes it even harder to cool yet.
__________________
dieselguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2016, 09:15 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
SeaDog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Idaho
Posts: 3,418
The difference between outside air and inside air temp does not give an indication of how well the AC is working. You need to measure the air temp at the return air grill of the AC and at the closet outlet for cold air. If you get a difference of 20* or so your unit is doing what is was designed to do. This is the reason for starting your AC prior to the inside of the trailer getting to 80*
__________________
Retired Navy
Jake my sidekick (yellow Lab)
2017 RAM 2500 CC 4X4 Cummins Diesel
2016 Flagstaff 26 FKWS
AF&AM of Idaho
SeaDog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2016, 10:35 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
dieselguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Kansas
Posts: 806
I understand the preferred temp differential of 16 - 20 degrees as measured from the intake to supply air on an A/C system. (humidity and cleanliness effect that number) With the limited amount of possible insulation in any RV ... I was just "off the hip" saying that getting a 20 degree differential between inside and outside air temps is doing good. 92 inside sounds hot till you read what the outside temp was.
__________________
dieselguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2016, 12:03 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
97flhtcui's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Austin Texas
Posts: 154
Johnm1,
I don't consider 92 degrees comfortable. I noticed the difference between outside and inside became greater as it got hotter. When you are in this type of heat, it gives you a opportunity to measure your temps at differ times of the day, then find hot spots so you have an idea what can be done to make the Rv more comfortable later. We are getting thermopane Windows when we are in Goshen for the rally in August. We are getting new painted caps under warranty so I am going to have more insulation put behind them because the cabinets in the living room and closet seem to be very hot during the day. The a/c units are working at capacity so I am going to fix everything else.
__________________
2011 Ford F-250 6.2l gas 373 rear end
2015 Cedar Creek 34RL
97flhtcui is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2016, 12:20 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Penfield
Posts: 176
97flhtcui - Please don't mistake my post as me thinking that 92 is comfy and your whining. Heck no ... and wholly cwap I think that'd be HOT. I've been in 100 in South Carolina with darn near 100% humidity and it was absolutely brutal. We'd go from the too warm ocean to the A/C in the RV ... hardly spent any time outside!

I'm just trying understand what RV A/C's are capable of in a hot and dry climate like AZ. I'd guess our single 13.5 wouldn't ever shut off.
__________________
John M
2013 GMC Sierra 2500DH CC, 4x4, D/A
2016 Forest River Vengeance 25V TT/TH
johnm1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2016, 12:39 PM   #8
Phat Phrog Stunt Team
 
TURBS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Iowa
Posts: 34,337
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnm1 View Post
97flhtcui - Please don't mistake my post as me thinking that 92 is comfy and your whining. Heck no ... and wholly cwap I think that'd be HOT. I've been in 100 in South Carolina with darn near 100% humidity and it was absolutely brutal. We'd go from the too warm ocean to the A/C in the RV ... hardly spent any time outside!

I'm just trying understand what RV A/C's are capable of in a hot and dry climate like AZ. I'd guess our single 13.5 wouldn't ever shut off.
A 15k would never shut off.

Sent from my SCH-R530U using Tapatalk
__________________
TURBS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2016, 12:44 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
97flhtcui's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Austin Texas
Posts: 154
Johnm1,
I understand you. You want to know what to expect. If you don't have ducted unit, the air is cooler coming out. Our cardinal had ducting in the living and kitchen and non ducted in the bedroom so we could get chilled while in the bedroom and would be sweating in the living. So you know our cedar creek that I took the temp readings on, those a/c's ran continuously since 11 am till 6 pm yesterday. We full time so I have a lot of time to research and analyze.
__________________
2011 Ford F-250 6.2l gas 373 rear end
2015 Cedar Creek 34RL
97flhtcui is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2016, 01:23 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
waiter21's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 627
John M;

Actually, AC units will perform better in dry environments because the AC unit isn't expending thermal energy in converting gaseous water to liquid water

Swamp coolers work on the exact opposite principle, They convert liquid water to water vapor. When they do this, thermal energy is extracted from the air and stored in the water vapor thus cooling down the air. i.e. water evaporating will cool the surrounding air.

The reasons swamp coolers work so well in high altitude deserts;

1) Thinner air allows the water to evaporate easier.

2) Dry air (low relative humidity) can more easily evaporate liquid water.

The big advantage of a swamp cooler is you only need to run a blower motor and a small water[pump.

There is no need to run the big compressor thats used in a AC unit.

Another advantage of a swamp cooler is that it adds a little moisture to the air, making it a little more comfortable to breath.
__________________

__________________
2001 Coachmen Mirada (Ford F53 6.8L V10) - Toad 2003 Saturn Vue
It won't do MACH 2, but I can get a sandwich and take a pee.
waiter21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:52 AM.