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Old 01-25-2016, 11:00 AM   #1
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Boon Docking wth a residential Fridge

Good Morning from Northern Nevada,

DW and I are Real close to working a deal on a Cedar Creek 34RE. It has a Residential Refrigerator.

All things considered correct, Inverter works, 4 6 Volt batteries installed and installed correctly, charging correctly from the truck .. etc........ how long can I expect the batteries to last when not plugged and boondocking? I do have two Honda 2000 Generators with a 30 Amp bridge. Never leave home without them. Have used them to pump up batteries and charge cell phones/computers etc.

I have searched this forum and the general forum and can't seem to find the answer. I have however, found LOTS of good Info about the units and trouble shooting!

Thank you in advance!

Dave Homen
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Old 01-25-2016, 11:25 AM   #2
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Lots a variables in that question.

Size of batteries?
Power consumption of not only the fridge, but everything else you might use.

Hard to give a hard answer.


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Old 01-25-2016, 11:56 AM   #3
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I can tell you that our residential fridge in our GT will go 6-8 hours without dropping more than a couple degrees WITHOUT any power. Forgot to turn on the inverter on our first trip out. Fridge was cold, ice still frozen. This was while we were traveling. Would imagine that with limited use, the fridge would last quite some time on just battery power, of course you have other things drawing on the batteries also, so it's going to be a trial and error kind of thing.
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Old 01-25-2016, 12:17 PM   #4
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Thanks to both. <Expletive> Starts with an "H" ....... didn't think that one all the way to the end. You are, of course, correct! I am thinking the biggest draw on the batteries, other than the fridge, for us, would be the heater. I replaced all the lights in my current fifth wheel with LED's and it had an immediate effect. The converter fan don't whine no moe with the lights on.

I think the fridge use would be limited while boon docking. Or at least now it certainly would be a major consideration when opening the door, to get in, get what you need and close it up.

Thanks Again!
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Old 01-25-2016, 05:27 PM   #5
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The fridge is just another item to draw down your batteries and forcing you to run the generator. When we boondock which is most of the time, I don't want to hear the generator running, so I am satisfied with the gas/120v absorbent fridge. Our works great and stays cold. it doesn't use very much propane and doesn't have much draw on my batteries. Remember, if you camp in cold or cooler weather, you will need to eventually run the furnace. Now you have 2 appliances that will draw fairly heavy from the batteries.

This is just my opinion. I would not buy the residential fridge. If it were me, I would opt for the large capacity 2 way fridge and pay the additional money to have it swapped into the RV. Then you are not dependent on running your generator or keeping the rig plugged in to keep your batteries charged up.
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Old 01-25-2016, 05:30 PM   #6
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You should have some way to check battery voltage to tell when you need to recharge
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Old 01-25-2016, 05:35 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edt View Post
You should have some way to check battery voltage to tell when you need to recharge
I am hoping the idiot lights that show charge and tank levels works well enough to keep me up to speed.
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Old 01-25-2016, 05:37 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Explorer1016 View Post
The fridge is just another item to draw down your batteries and forcing you to run the generator. When we boondock which is most of the time, I don't want to hear the generator running, so I am satisfied with the gas/120v absorbent fridge. Our works great and stays cold. it doesn't use very much propane and doesn't have much draw on my batteries. Remember, if you camp in cold or cooler weather, you will need to eventually run the furnace. Now you have 2 appliances that will draw fairly heavy from the batteries.

This is just my opinion. I would not buy the residential fridge. If it were me, I would opt for the large capacity 2 way fridge and pay the additional money to have it swapped into the RV. Then you are not dependent on running your generator or keeping the rig plugged in to keep your batteries charged up.
We have been kicking that around too. The Montana's have all pretty much gone to the dual fridge. We will need to ask about having that put in the 34RE when we go that direction. Thanks!!!
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Old 01-25-2016, 05:54 PM   #9
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In my opinion you need propane for boondocking to save your battery capacity for other uses. For Every 120 watts the inverter will pull about 10 amps from your batteries. That adds up quickly.
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Old 01-25-2016, 05:54 PM   #10
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My fridge is a 10 cu. ft double door Dometic 2 way. I know Norcold and Dometic both make a larger capacity double door unit (side by side) for the bigger class A rigs and towables for large families.

I installed a Trimetric 2030RV system monitor for my batteries. With the push of a button I can monitor every state of my batteries, volts, capacity, amp draw, charge rate etc. The indicator lights could be misleading when it comes to something as critical as battery state. My monitor didn't cost that much (maybe $150.00) and it was very simple to install. My battery compartment is right by my entry door so I installed the monitor on the side of my sink base which is right at the steps and by my water heater controls and slide controls. Bogart Engineering | manufacturer of the TriMetric battery monitor which measures volts, amps and amp-hours for battery systems
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