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Old 04-04-2017, 08:44 AM   #1
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Inverter Install?

So I'm thinking of doing an inverter install.

I've found this AIMS Power PICOGLF10W12V120VR inverter that also has a charger.

Inverter Output Specifications:
Continuous Output Power: 1000 Watts
Surge Rating: 3000 Watts (20 Seconds)
Output Waveform: Pure Sine/Same as input (Bypass Mode)
Nominal Efficiency: >88% (Peak)
Line Mode Efficiency: >95%
Output Frequency: 50Hz +/- 0.3Hz / 60Hz +/- 0.3Hz
Typical Transfer Time: 10ms (Max)
Bypass Breaker - 20 amps
THD: < 10% DC

Input Specifications
Nominal Input Voltage: 12.0Vdc
Minimum Start Voltage: 10.0Vdc
Low Battery Alarm: 10.5Vdc-11.0Vdc
Low battery Trip: 10.0Vdc-10.5Vdc
High Voltage Alarm: 16.0Vdc
Low battery Voltage Restart: 15.5Vdc
Idle Consumption: < 12.5 watts
Charger breaker 10 amps
Power Saver Mode Idle Consumption: <7.5 wattsC

Charger Specifications
Output voltage: Depends on battery Type
Charger Rate: 35A
Over Charge Protection Shutdown 15.7V
Selectable Charge setting based on battery type
Adjustable charge current off-20%-100%
Four Stage Smart Charger

Transfer Switch Specifications
30 amp auotmatic transfer switch
10 ms (max)
Now I know our 30DS has a converter/charger (which had to be replaced under warranty already <shakes fist>). Am I right in thinking I could use this to replace the current converter/charger and push 120 to the RV outlets? I would just need a manual or or automatic transfer switch for shore/inverter power and I'd be good to go?

Or should I get a standalone inverter and run it alongside the current charger/converter?

In the end I just want to be able to charge phones/cameras off the AC outlets when not connected to shore power, maybe run the tv for a little while at night without the generator (tend to boondock more than not).
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Old 04-04-2017, 08:58 AM   #2
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Personal choice. the inverter you are looking at already has a built in transfer switch. You will need to pull the wire off of the 15 amp breaker in your panel that feeds the non GFCI outlets and wire the inverter's transfer switch output into that breaker. All of your non GFCI outlets will then automatically be powered on AC,generator or inverter.
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Old 04-04-2017, 09:06 AM   #3
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I actually linked wrong inverter, but it doesn't look like that should change anything. ( changed it in original post)

I'm not following you on the 'non gfci wire' statement though. I would think that to install the inverter I would have to have Generator and Shore power on their own Auto Transfer switch to supply AC to the inverter, then the inverter would switch between Battery/AC and I could then feed the Inverter Out directly to the panel's main power line.
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Old 04-04-2017, 09:09 AM   #4
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That is automatic with an inverter transfer switch. When you wire it to an existing outlet, the only decision that the inverter's transfer switch needs to make is "is someone else supplying 110VAC, if so, I will use that instead of the inverter." It connects to the breaker, the circuit you wish to power and the inverter. When it sees power on the breaker (from the generator or shore power) it connects to that and disconnects the output of the inverter, letting it just idle at around an amp of DC or so.
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Old 04-04-2017, 09:28 AM   #5
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Maybe we're talking about the same thing and I'm just not understanding. This is a diagram of how I thought this would be installed.

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Old 04-04-2017, 09:29 AM   #6
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First of all the charger that is in the inverter you are talking about is only a 35 amp charger. The converter you have now is a 70 amp smart converter.

Were do you plan on mounting your inverter? The closer to the batteries the better. I mounted a 1500 watt inverter in the cabinet behind the batteries and used 1/0 cable to run the inverter. We power the hole coach with this setup when we are on the road. The only thing we can't run is the AC,every thing else will work off of the inverter. The only thing we have to do when using the inverter is disable the converter when on inverter power.
Good luck.
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Old 04-04-2017, 09:41 AM   #7
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I want what you have. lol. I'm just trying to figure out how it all works and what would be the best setup with the least amount of manual swtiching of power plugs/switches.

So for your setup you have the stock converter/charger. Then you have a plain invert installed next to the batteries. That is wired directly to the breaker for non-gfci equipment?

Do you have to turn the charger/converter off manually when running the inverter?

Do you have to turn the inverter off if you're on shore/generator power?

Also I think my converter is only 30A
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Old 04-04-2017, 09:58 AM   #8
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Ok here we go. First of all I installed a transfer with for the generator when I first got the unit. I didn't like plugging and un-plugging the cable every time I wanted to run the generator. Also my transfer switch has a 25 sec delay built into it so the generator will stabilize before switching over.

Now to the inverter, after installing the inverter i ran 12-3 wire to the rear of the coach and installed a 3 prong rv plug in the back compartment near the converter. When I am gong to run the converter I plug the shore power cord into the plug and the whole coach is powered up then. Also if you should need the generator you can start it and don't have to unplug anything. As far as the converter goes i do have to shut it off if I am running the inverter.

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Old 04-04-2017, 10:02 AM   #9
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Yes, it is tempting to just plug the whole coach into the inverter. Of course you can do it but you then have to make sure to turn off some of your bigger loads like A/C (yes you wouldn't turn it on, but are you alone?), your power converter your H/W heater.

What I really wonder about is what are you going to power that doesn't use a receptacle? Perhaps the microwave?

You can manually plug your coach into the inverter, but you cannot use its transfer switch since most will not handle the total load when on shore or genny, and you really will need a special unit for a 50 amp coach.
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Old 04-04-2017, 10:10 AM   #10
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thanks for the picture. I understand the issue and the two proposed solutions. it has to do with isolating the converter input from the inverter output when running on the inverter. you do not want inverter output power to get to the converter which will try to send it back to the battery. an endless loop that will do nothing. so the solution is to disconnect input a/c power to the converter when running on the inverter.


one approach is to wire the inverter output to the selected distribution branch circuit via a transfer switch that will provide either shore power or inverter power (but not both) to that circuit. the simplest case of this is to install a dedicated outlet circuit directly from the inverter that does not even connect to the distribution panel (will never see shore power). the disadvantage of this is that it may not power all outlets from the inverter.


the inverter mentioned has a transfer switch function built in. the proposed solution is to wire inverter output to the input side of the distribution panel. this way the entire distribution panel and all output branch circuits will be powered by either shore power or the inverter. while it is stated that the built in transfer switch will pass either shore power or inverter power out (but not both) there is one other function that I believe it is also performing that make is a viable solution. remember one of the branch circuits out of the distribution panel is to power the converter. this combined converter / inverter must also be disconnecting the converter side when running on battery power. thus you avoid that endless loop (battery to inverter to distribution panel to converter back to battery). the advantage is that all receptacles would have power available when running on the inverter. the downside would be that you could overload the inverter with things like a/c, water heater, microwave, portable heaters, etc).


which way to go? to each his own! what works for you
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