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Old 12-24-2018, 11:29 AM   #1
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Snow Chains

Im heading to Flagstaff the day after Christmas and planning on camping off the grid at a local spot (popular with Class A people). The spot is on a solid hard packed road and within 1/2 mile of pavement. The forecast is PM snow showers on Friday & Saturday and again on New Years.
I will be set up before the first snow and will leave Jan 3 so it may or may not be melted by the time I leave.
I have not driven 2018 FR3 30 in snow, ice, or slush.
Thoughts on snow chains? Brand? Cost?
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Old 12-24-2018, 11:45 AM   #2
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Im heading to Flagstaff the day after Christmas and planning on camping off the grid at a local spot (popular with Class A people). The spot is on a solid hard packed road and within 1/2 mile of pavement. The forecast is PM snow showers on Friday & Saturday and again on New Years.
I will be set up before the first snow and will leave Jan 3 so it may or may not be melted by the time I leave.
I have not driven 2018 FR3 30 in snow, ice, or slush.
Thoughts on snow chains? Brand? Cost?
One thought, I have two sets of chains.
Second set goes on the tt so it doesn't try to pass me when braking. Drag chains is the term some truckers use.
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Old 12-24-2018, 08:06 PM   #3
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Thoughts on snow chains? Brand? Cost?
Tire size will determine what type of chain will be available. Cheapest will be cable chains but often are the least effective when it comes to stopping "power".

The biggest gripe I have with chains is how they always loosen. I recently bought a set of "Peerless" chains that have auto adjusters built in. Found them on Amazon. Not cheap but a lot less than a tow. The Peerless Auto-trac has a diamond shaped cross chain setup so you not only have better side to side stability (like when going around a corner) but a greater chance of having some chain on the road when braking.

Here's a link to them on Amazon:

https://smile.amazon.com/Peerless-02...ess+tire+chain

All kinds of cheaper options but in my experience, cheaper is not necessarily what you want when the weather is bad and you have tens of thousands of dollars worth of car/truck/RV that you want to keep safe on snow/ice.
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Old 12-24-2018, 08:08 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clamper View Post
Thoughts on snow chains? Brand? Cost?
Tire size will determine what type of chain will be available. Cheapest will be cable chains but often are the least effective when it comes to stopping "power".

The biggest gripe I have with chains is how they always loosen. I recently bought a set of "Peerless" chains that have auto adjusters built in. Found them on Amazon. Not cheap but a lot less than a tow. The Peerless Auto-trac has a diamond shaped cross chain setup so you not only have better side to side stability (like when going around a corner) but a greater chance of having some chain on the road when braking.

Here's a link to them on Amazon:

https://smile.amazon.com/Peerless-02...ess+tire+chain

All kinds of cheaper options but in my experience, cheaper is not necessarily what you want when the weather is bad and you have tens of thousands of dollars worth of car/truck/RV that you want to keep safe on snow/ice.

BTW, chains are like Seat Belts, First Aid Kits, firearms for self defense, etc. It's a good idea to have them but in every case you really don't want to use them. If you do have to use any of them you want the best available.
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Old 12-24-2018, 08:46 PM   #5
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Chains are not for regular highway driving only to keep you from getting into trouble not getting out of trouble and you don't want to go faster than 15 -25 mph max. anyway. Also, before you buy chains make sure you have plenty of clearance, if these chains stretch and get caught in the fender it will ruin your trip completely. Try hanging and adjusting (removing excess links) the chains before you go on your trip.

Learn how your RV handles in adverse conditions, adjust your speed, keep plenty of space between you and the vehicle in front of you and most importantly don't pay attention to the tailgaters! Snow packed roads don't have to be dangerous to drive on when you use common sense.
I carry two sets of these in my truck:
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