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Old 09-13-2017, 10:51 PM   #1
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Cooked Brakes!!!

I recently took my T2460 in for some warranty repairs and also asked them to check the TT brakes as I thought they were not working 100%. I always check the gain on the controller before I set off each trip so that is how I knew the brakes were not functioning correctly. The dealer reports the brake linings are glazed and the bearing grease looks as if it has melted out. The trailer has only done 2600 miles and to put it mildly I am really concerned and looking for some answers. I am new to towing and I have been very careful in the use of the brakes and rely more on the tow haul for descents than the brakes. I am not the only driver and I am not always in the truck on some legs of the trip so I do not know if the other driver is as careful as I am with the braking. One of my concerns is that my FIL who tows a 5th wheel advised me to never use the downshift when I want to slow in traffic or stop but to use the trailer brakes to slow down. Could this be one of the reasons my brakes are cooking as I am using the TT brakes to slow down?

Thanks
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Old 09-13-2017, 11:20 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Cahriad View Post
One of my concerns is that my FIL who tows a 5th wheel advised me to never use the downshift when I want to slow in traffic or stop but to use the trailer brakes to slow down. Could this be one of the reasons my brakes are cooking as I am using the TT brakes to slow down
That definitely could be a reason. The TT brakes are made to stop the TT...ONLY!
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Old 09-14-2017, 10:48 AM   #3
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Assuming that RV has EZ-Lube axles, they may have had a problem from the start.

I had to replace the brakes on our new RV not long ago because the EZ-Lube zerks were overgreased and blew out the rear seals. I had never added any grease to them, so it had to have been done at either the dealer or the factory.

I'm said that because I don't want you to assume that you or anyone else towing the RV had anything to do with the problem.

Are they replacing the brakes under warranty?
If not (and they haven't already replaced them) it's and easy job to replace them. You can buy loaded back plates for less than individual brakes and magnets.
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Old 09-14-2017, 10:57 AM   #4
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IMO, The only time you should manually apply electric brakes is when you first start out after sitting awhile (in order to burnish any rust on the inside of the drums) and on the road if the trailer starts to sway.
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Old 09-14-2017, 11:24 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Bama Rambler View Post
Assuming that RV has EZ-Lube axles, they may have had a problem from the start.

I had to replace the brakes on our new RV not long ago because the EZ-Lube zerks were overgreased and blew out the rear seals. I had never added any grease to them, so it had to have been done at either the dealer or the factory.

I'm said that because I don't want you to assume that you or anyone else towing the RV had anything to do with the problem.

Are they replacing the brakes under warranty?
If not (and they haven't already replaced them) it's and easy job to replace them. You can buy loaded back plates for less than individual brakes and magnets.
I was there when they opened up the drums and because the shoes were badly glazed they will not cover under warranty.
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Old 09-14-2017, 11:26 AM   #6
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IMO, The only time you should manually apply electric brakes is when you first start out after sitting awhile (in order to burnish any rust on the inside of the drums) and on the road if the trailer starts to sway.
What Bluepill said X2

Never just use trailer brakes only, unless in an emergency situation and you know just what to do.
My integral brake controller on my Ford has settings for not only the gain (which I set to 70%) but also low-med-high effort. Towing my dozer on a big gooseneck I might have the effort set on high (sometimes not if I know the road well where I'm moving it. When under my 5th wheel I leave it set to med at 70%

I also activate my engine exhaust braking mode when towing so the vast majority of the time I use very little braking. I let the engine and tranny do the most work for me. I have never overheated a brake and I always feel my tires and wheels for temperature every time I stop.
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Old 09-14-2017, 11:28 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Cahriad View Post
I recently took my T2460 in for some warranty repairs and also asked them to check the TT brakes as I thought they were not working 100%. I always check the gain on the controller before I set off each trip so that is how I knew the brakes were not functioning correctly. The dealer reports the brake linings are glazed and the bearing grease looks as if it has melted out. The trailer has only done 2600 miles and to put it mildly I am really concerned and looking for some answers. I am new to towing and I have been very careful in the use of the brakes and rely more on the tow haul for descents than the brakes. I am not the only driver and I am not always in the truck on some legs of the trip so I do not know if the other driver is as careful as I am with the braking. One of my concerns is that my FIL who tows a 5th wheel advised me to never use the downshift when I want to slow in traffic or stop but to use the trailer brakes to slow down. Could this be one of the reasons my brakes are cooking as I am using the TT brakes to slow down?

Thanks

What kind of brakes do you have? You can 'see' that your brakes became very hot...

1) If you have an EZ-lube axles..... there is very little grease in them... The bearings are greased when put in, but the grease lines have no grease in them and if you put a 'pump or two' of grease in the zert, you are doing nothing. The channels will almost take a half tube of grease on each tire.

2) Do you have 'FORWARD' adjusting brakes or 'backing' adjusting brakes???? I have 'Forward' adjusting brakes (and did not know it) and applying 'to much' (?), pressure will tighten the brakes pads EVERY TIME you apply the brake pedal. Over time, your brakes are rubbing on the hubs, even when you are not using the brakes. I have (learned the hard way) now keep my trailer brakes 'light' and test/adjust (loosen) after every trip.

If you are having this 'problem' now... you WILL have this problem in the future until you know how to deal with it.
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Old 09-14-2017, 11:36 AM   #8
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What Bluepill said X2

I also activate my engine exhaust braking mode when towing so the vast majority of the time I use very little braking. I let the engine and tranny do the most work for me. I have never overheated a brake and I always feel my tires and wheels for temperature every time I stop.
X3, Except, would add, recommend you get a TPMS system with Temperature monitoring. When things heat up in the hub/drum, it transfers to the wheel and tire and if it was hot enough to melt grease, you will definitely see the temperature, (And PSI), go up for the wheels. Had a brake go bad that heated up the drum and could easily spot an issue on the TPMS.
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