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Old 08-13-2019, 06:46 PM   #1
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Fiberglass siding or Aluminum siding.

Hello all,
Have a 2017 22RR Grey Wolf Toy hauler and looking to trade up to a 23 Pack 15 Toy Hauler. I am very fussy with cleaning my equipment.
They have both types of siding for this model. Not sure what to go with.
Opinions would be very great full.

Thank you.
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Old 08-13-2019, 07:39 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by smithmx47 View Post
Hello all,
Have a 2017 22RR Grey Wolf Toy hauler and looking to trade up to a 23 Pack 15 Toy Hauler. I am very fussy with cleaning my equipment.
They have both types of siding for this model. Not sure what to go with.
Opinions would be very great full.

Thank you.
I had a TT with aluminum siding that ran horizontal ("ship lap"). It was more difficult to clean than than the smooth side on our 5th wheel.

I THINK aluminum sides is generally considered lower quality construction.
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Old 08-14-2019, 12:46 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by LegacyFB38 View Post
I had a TT with aluminum siding that ran horizontal ("ship lap"). It was more difficult to clean than than the smooth side on our 5th wheel.

I THINK aluminum sides is generally considered lower quality construction.
I had fiberglass on my previous TT, and I have aluminum on my current TT. The fiberglass is considered an upgrade, and adds about $1000 to the price of my current model.

That being said, I found the opposite when it comes to cleaning. The fiberglass seemed to get dingy over time, and there was nothing I could do to restore it to its original white color.

It may just depend on the color. My current TT is gray and blue, so it doesn't show dirt as well as the old white one did.
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Old 08-14-2019, 01:03 AM   #4
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Generally aluminum sided trailers have wood framing, therefore heavier than a comparable filon sided trailer, since they have an aluminum frame.
I would ask for the weight of each version or the weight differences.
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Old 08-14-2019, 01:38 AM   #5
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Here are three videos that speak to PRO's and CON's of different RV building techniques.

I have a wood stud, fiberglass skin 23 Pack 15 Toy Hauler. I'm a true believer that if you keep it dry, almost all RV's built today will last 10-15 years. Seal the roof, do the quarterly inspections and touch up anything that needs it and they are all going to last. Get lazy, let water intrude into the camper and wick through wood somewhere and your going to have rot or delamination.

Love the smooth sides and ease of cleaning. Had a popup with aluminum skin and found it a PITA to clean the underside of the little grooves with a brush along with sealing the edges where the metal met the corner covers. Swore to myself, that would be my last wavy skinned Aluminum RV.

By the way, the front cap of the 23Pack15 is aluminum (Smooth).

Good Luck in your decision.
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Old 08-14-2019, 05:45 AM   #6
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Pros and Cons for both. I've had both and liked both. The fiberglass...in my case required more care to keep looking nice than the Aluminum. Delamination was another problem with the fiberglass when I had a small leak by a cargo door. Hail dings are easy to get in a storm with Aluminum, but has been easier to keep looking good with a little wax each spring and fall. I'ts a tough choice.
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Old 08-14-2019, 06:52 AM   #7
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Thank you everyone Much appreciated.......
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Old 08-14-2019, 01:34 PM   #8
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Besides the delam issues, there is also the dreaded cracks that show up in cutout corners and such. Although I have never owned a fiberglass sided camper, my tin one suites us just fine and is really not that hard to keep clean and shiney
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Old 08-14-2019, 03:05 PM   #9
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I previously owned an aluminum-clad trailer and more recently two fiberglass units. The fiberglass looks great but regular waxing is a must or risk fading of the finish. I'd pick aluminum for durability and less demanding upkeep, but a well-maintained fiberglass unit looks so much nicer. You get from it what you put in. Let your schedule of regular cleaning/waxing slip and a faded finish may well be your reward.
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Old 08-14-2019, 03:12 PM   #10
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The 22RR is going to be stick construction no matter what siding is on it. At least with metal it will be cheaper, easier and cheaper to repair, and won’t fade. It will only look “cheap” and “entry level” to those that are rubes. Cherokee stick builds are good quality for the most part.
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Old 08-14-2019, 03:52 PM   #11
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Fiberglass

The Fiberglass is better at insulating w/ the light insulation they put in the trailers. Also more resilient and easier to clean IMO.
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Old 08-14-2019, 04:13 PM   #12
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Fiberglass siding

The reason I would never have aluminum siding is the damage hail does to it. My first TT had slight dings, but my neighbor had a TT that was pounded flat from hail. With the weather patterns we have seen hail about 3-4 times already this year, and at the rate we are going will see a lot more in the future. Throughout the years, we have had no hail problems with fiberglass siding. Hail like below did put a dent in my hood.
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Old 08-14-2019, 04:28 PM   #13
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The Fiberglass is better at insulating w/ the light insulation they put in the trailers. Also more resilient and easier to clean IMO.
Well that could be true. Maybe a R1 compared to aluminum. The wood and batt insulation is really the major players. It is compartmentalism of air within them that provides the insulation. A non porous hard fiberglass layer is the equivalent of maybe a silk shirt at best compared to the the batt insulation and wood frame being the equivalent of wearing woolens. One is not going to see enough of an insulation factor to justify the additional cost. Let’s be real, in the case of the trailer being discussed, it is all about looks and appearances. It is putting lipstick on a pig by selecting fiberglass over metal. Aluminum side is cost effective and durable.
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Old 08-22-2019, 10:33 PM   #14
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We have been RV-ing for more than 40 years, and we have never owned a trailer with aluminum siding. Some of our friends have had TT's with aluminum siding, and suffered serious degradation of the paint and finish, with difficulty cleaning their TT's.

There are TT's with fiberglass siding that does not include the glossy outer gel-coat. Stay away from those. The fiberglass fibers show through to the top coat, and those finishes weather badly. All of the TT's we have owned had top quality gel-coat exteriors, and were easy to clean, wax, and maintain, and looked like new when we traded them. Our current Cardinal 5th wheel is made the same way. It is now in its 4th season and looks like brand new.
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Old 08-23-2019, 10:53 AM   #15
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Fiberglass by a mile.
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Old 08-26-2019, 06:44 AM   #16
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Thank you all for your input ...
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