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Old 11-12-2018, 03:47 AM   #1
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Under Chassis Insulation

Have a 2018 Grey Wolf 26DBH and getting ready to travel to colder weather. The entire underside is covered with what I assume is a thin layer of insulation so I cannot see anything underneath the unit. Does anyone know the R valve and if it's sufficient to protect plumbing on 25 degree nights with daytime temps in the 40s?
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Old 11-12-2018, 06:46 AM   #2
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The Black "Coraplast" is more of a COVER than Insulation! Youroo!!
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Old 11-12-2018, 10:00 AM   #3
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As previously noted, the chloroplast had minimal R value. BUT, what it does do is create a dead air space around your tanks and water lines. Which, if you have an "Artic" package, is heated by a duct from your furnace.

I camped in temps that dropped to the low 20s in my 2014 Avenger this fall and didn't have any problems. The important thing is to rely on your furnace for heat and not use an electric heater. If you do that, then there isn't any heat going into the underbelly. Before we got those really cold nights I sealed the front and the two sides of the chloroplast with good quality foil tape. I left the back unsealed so that if I ever have a leak the water can drain out the back and I will be aware of it.

Good luck!
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Old 11-12-2018, 11:58 AM   #4
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I would winterize the camper if I was going to travel somewhere the weather was freezing, itís cheap insurance
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Old 11-13-2018, 07:09 AM   #5
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Really appreciate that information. I looked up coraplast and saw what it actually was, so now I know it does little to insulate. Thanks again.
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Old 11-13-2018, 07:12 AM   #6
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Great information to have, thank you. Fortunately it appears, for now, the weather forecast has the temps slightly above freezing for where we're headed, but that can always change.
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Old 11-13-2018, 07:16 AM   #7
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I was thinking of winterizing, but since we'll be living in the unit that would be extremely difficult. The temps are now forecast to be slightly above freezing so we may have dodged the bullet this trip.
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Old 11-13-2018, 09:30 AM   #8
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I would call Cherokee and ask them if there's any insulation above the coroplast.
We had an RV once that had sheets of 1" thick styrofoam laid above the coroplast. It was pretty well insulated.

Or you could pull down a corner of it and see for yourself.
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Old 11-13-2018, 09:41 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bama Rambler View Post
I would call Cherokee and ask them if there's any insulation above the coroplast.
We had an RV once that had sheets of 1" thick styrofoam laid above the coroplast. It was pretty well insulated.

Or you could pull down a corner of it and see for yourself.
When it dries out around the local area, I'll do just that. Thanks for the suggestion.
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Old 11-17-2018, 12:10 AM   #10
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If one wants to really beef up things, get insulation batts at your local home supply and insert on top of the corrugated plastic, or get some foam board insulation as was mentioned. Maybe even getting some thicker corrugated plastic panels and doing a more professional job. One can get 4' x 8' corrugated plastic panels in varying thicknesses. I did a quick search and found 4mm, 6mm, and 8mm thickness panels. Maybe use some 3/4 x 3/4 aluminum channel to provide support of the panel ends. The result would last a long, long time and one could easily take this apart to make a repair underneath without cutting or damaging the panels.
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