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Old 06-17-2018, 11:41 PM   #1
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When is winterization required in mild climates

Let's say you had a DX3 and lived in an area where you only saw mild freezes typically with only a few hours below 32* at night for just a few days in a row and almost never had 24hr periods in the 30s.

Would this typically be OK when not in use.

Are there specific areas that you could put a small heater/bulb in under the coach to avoid full winterization so you could continue to use the coach without having to drain everything after each use.

Also, what if you are using the coach in a cold snap and have the heat on. Is there any concern then of a freezing line.

Sorry for the newb questions.. just want to know what I'm getting into from a maintenance perspective and what some different strategies are to keep using it in those in-between climates.
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Old 06-17-2018, 11:44 PM   #2
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I get the occasional nights with below freezing. I never winterize and that includes the engine block in my boat. Of course it has a lot more mass.

If you only get a few hours, I would not worry.

Where do you live?
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Old 06-18-2018, 02:19 AM   #3
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He's in Austin, TX.

We live near Houston and this year was the first time we fully winterized. It was just too cold for too long.

Usually if we're camping in below 30 degree weather, we unhook the fresh water inlet hose, because that will freeze before anything in the coach freezes.
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Old 06-18-2018, 07:10 AM   #4
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We live in an area that rarely freezes. But it does freeze at times.

When we are not using the RV we watch the expected lows and I will use my compressor to blow out all the lines when we see a freeze warning. Takes about 10 minutes. Never have used antifreeze and have never had problems.

When we are camping in freezing weather at full hookups, we will fill the fresh water tank, use the pump, and disconnect the hose to the CG water. We also set the thermostat so the gas heater will come on periodically to ensure the interior lines won't freeze. Usually running the RVs heater is sufficient to prevent freezing.

Every RV is different and you will soon discover any problem areas that you might have to provide additional insulation or heat source to.
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Old 06-18-2018, 07:16 AM   #5
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In the spring I’ve just left the electric aqua hot element running to avoid winterizing. This of course needs a plug for storage. Gives peace of mind that the most exoensive part of the water system is protected and the way the lines run really protects the rest of the system as well.

That said winterizing really isn’t that bad. This past winter we took two trips so I ended up doing it three times. Got it down under a half hour with some practice. Just became part of the winter unloading process.
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Old 06-18-2018, 10:46 AM   #6
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30 minutes sounds easy enough.. I like the idea of just blowing out the lines with compressed air.

I'm sure I'll have more questions after I get one.. but this is basically the info I was looking for.

I never had to worry about it with my boat because it was wet docked and the water itself provided plenty of insulation.
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Old 06-18-2018, 11:33 AM   #7
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We have blown out the lines with compressed air in the past.

Left the faucets open in the hope that if the water small amount of water that might be hiding in the lines started to freeze, the open faucet would relieve the pressure on the line. Never had a problem.

Used antifreeze this year because of 20 degree weather.
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Old 06-18-2018, 01:22 PM   #8
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Antifreeze vs Compressed air

This debate goes on and on. When I went on the tour at the Dynamax factory last month, I asked the regional manager who was showing me around abut winterization. He said that at the factory they use compressed air routinely and he recommended it. Then when I did my PDI at the Grand Rapid's Dealer, I asked the same question and got a completely different answer. They strongly recommended antifreeze rather than compressed air. It seems like the Anderson Valve would lend itself nicely to using compressed air, but other than the regional Manager at Dynamax, I haven't come across anyone else who recommends it.
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Old 06-18-2018, 01:34 PM   #9
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For what it’s worth aqua hot recommends anti freeze and won’t warranty frozen breaks afaik.

Compressed air will get most of the water out but what’s left is sure to condense at the low points, one possibly being the aqua hot. That’s enough for me to use the anti freeze for peace of mind alone. But when you’re in that not so hard freeze realm you may very well be alright.

I can anecdotally confirm the hose reel is surprisingly resilient to freezing as it happened twice in Breckinridge this feb. not looking to test any further up the system though lol
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Old 06-18-2018, 01:44 PM   #10
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It's all about location, storage lengths, and usage. And of course any business or manufacturer is going to recommend the highest level of freeze protection. It's all about CYA.

The OP is talking about the climate in the Southwest, where we have mild, short freezes. We can also RV year round. I personally don't know anyone in this area that uses antifreeze. Main reason is it's a PITA and not really necessary if you blow everything out well.

Now if you are in a cold climate with hard freezes and store your RV for months, that's a different story.

But this thread is about warmer climates
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