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Old 06-14-2016, 06:58 PM   #21
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Thank you for the advice. I plan to contact Forest River in the next week or two and see what they say. Feels like 61 - 65 makes the most sense. Would like to weigh the rig. Is it a free service or about what would it cost? Thanks again.
Cost of getting RV weighed
Depends on where and if you just get the "axle weights" or "4 corner weights".
You can check your local truck stop to find one with a "truck scale". This will give the total load for each axle. I have not been to a CAT scale lately but it seemed to me a single weighing with a number of Front axle and another for Rear axle is somewhere about $10 to $20.

Some states such as Oregon have the state scales open 7/24. You do not get a printout but you can take the time to learn the 4 corner weights".

Here is a link to a RV forum that focuses on 5vers but they have info on scales and a LINK on how to do the "4 corner weights" yourself.
RVSEF is a company that does 4 corner weights and gives you a detailed weight sheet along with info on the minimum inflation needs for your RV.

Truck scale locations.
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Old 06-17-2016, 03:23 AM   #22
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Thanks again

Thank you for the info re scales...I will try to do so this summer.
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Old 06-17-2016, 11:48 AM   #23
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Pretty inadaquate

Nicktano, you don't show what State you are in, but here in the West, I drive through the State's truck weight stations when they are closed. Oregon and Washington usually leave the digital readouts on. I can weight just one axle a time, but that works well. It may not be that precise but neither is the pressure in my tires, which vary with temperature.

I'd like to add that the FR owner's manual has to be the worst manual I have ever seen. It essentially says. "We build a box that we don't serve. See: your dealer. But, here are all the disclaimers that our attorneys have ask us to write. For everything else, see the owner's manual for that particular component."

I looks like the dealers have no factory training. They have yet been able to help me set the clock on the Jensen radio in the cabin. The included manual is for a different radio. Like my previous TTs and small motor home, I have had to become my own service technician. But the very least the dealer could do is get the proper tire pressure for all their models and brands, if for no other reason than the issue of highway safety. Where is the NHTSA?
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Old 06-17-2016, 03:12 PM   #24
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Aspenmeadow
Basically agree with what you said except for one item.

NHTSA is concerned with safety related issues. radios and refrigerators and slide-outs would not be safety related unless the refrig is catching fire or the slide-out is moving out when driving.

You should not have to do this but I would think that a search on Jensen radio with the model number would get you the info you need.

Maybe if you post the Dealer name and the exact model RV others may learn to avoid that model and/or that dealer.

Yelp review site is not just restaurants but has car dealerships so why not RV dealership or even RV brand? As long as you stick to facts I would think you are OK.
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Old 06-17-2016, 03:22 PM   #25
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NHTSA concerned?

Tireman9, I was referring to just the tire pressure issue that should be the concern of NHTSA since surveys have shown most RVs are below safe pressure standards or overloaded.

The rest of it still stands that the dealers appear to be sales only. The service with other units I have owned has been uninformed and bad, with the exception of a Canadian manufacturer, ESCAPE TRAILERS that sell direct with no dealer networks. Escape was terrific.
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Old 06-17-2016, 03:39 PM   #26
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As long as you have at least 61 psi, you are fine.

Get TPMS and adjust from there to your ride preference.
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Old 06-18-2016, 10:59 AM   #27
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Tireman9, I was referring to just the tire pressure issue that should be the concern of NHTSA since surveys have shown most RVs are below safe pressure standards or overloaded.

The rest of it still stands that the dealers appear to be sales only. The service with other units I have owned has been uninformed and bad, with the exception of a Canadian manufacturer, ESCAPE TRAILERS that sell direct with no dealer networks. Escape was terrific.

OK. RE pressure.
NHTSA is concerned with tires meeting the regulations. It is the RV MFG responsibility to specify tire inflation that will support or exceed the expected / stated max load on the axle.
The problems arise when the assumption is made of an exact 50/50 side to side load split and the tendency of RV companies to select the lowest cost option (smallest, lowest cost) that barely meets the minimum requirements).

The 61 psi is a bit odd as most tires designed in the US are to TRA standards which publish load/inflation tables in 5 psi increments. The European or Asian standards while similar use Kpa which can end up with odd psi numbers when doing the conversion.

RV owners can confirm the minimum inflation needed for their tires by learning the actual load on each end of each axle, then consulting Load/Inflation tables to learn the MINIMUM inflation required. I suggest the cold inflation be set to at least 10% above the minimum needed to avoid the necessity of adding one or 2 psi when the Ambient temperature changes.

There is a lot of supporting and background information in the over 225 posts on tires, TPMS, valves and related information in my blog. The blog does have display advertising, but the income goes to the blog owner not me. I am only the contributor. I sell nothing and receive no commission.
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