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Old 06-04-2019, 03:46 PM   #1
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Preparing Tires for Travel

We have a new Salem Hemisphere 356QB Fifth Wheel and are preparing to travel to Florida in it in a few weeks. The trip will be about 1,000 miles each way, and since it will be late June/early July, I was wondering about the heat on the tires? It came with Castle Rock ST235/80R16's, E-Rated, and I have read where people have troubles with Castle Rock Tires. Is it all tires, or only certain ones? Also, they say the air pressure cold should be at 80 PSI, but I am wondering if I should actually fill them to 80 PSI, or perhaps go a little lower (maybe 75 PSI) knowing the pressure will build in the heat? I know a lot of people say to replace the tires right away, but I was hoping that we could get a season on them, especially if we check the pressure and handle them correctly. Any advice or suggestions is appreciated.
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Old 06-04-2019, 06:11 PM   #2
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Hi,

Fill the tires cold to the indicated sidewall pressure. The manufacturer takes rolling heat buildup into account when those numbers are set.

FWIW.

Rich Phillips
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Old 06-04-2019, 06:35 PM   #3
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make sure your weight is distributed as evenly as possible and that you are not overloaded. the tires also have speed ratings. stay within it. check tire pressure each morning and have a compressor that can top them off if necessary.

enjoy your trip
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Old 06-04-2019, 06:50 PM   #4
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Preparing Tires for Travel

Thank you RichP and ChickDoe. I have a small compressor I will take and probably check along the way. They are brand new tires so was thinking should not have issues, but I have read people's posts about tire troubles. I will plan on the full 80 PSI then and then allow the tires to work and will just monitor. Thanks for your input.
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Old 06-05-2019, 03:32 PM   #5
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The first suggestion is to make certain each tire is balanced. A tire that is out-of-balance will pound the pavement and cause unusual wear patterns as-well-as cause vibrations in the TT. We have been told by tire dealers that it is not important to balance the rear tires of a vehicle or trailer tires. Hogwash, balance is important. Tires are not made to roll like a cam. It is called loping.

Make sure to check each tire before taking trips. Air pressure is one thing, but also check for bubbles in the side walls, loping tires (out of round), sidewall cracks, tread cuts, tread separations, unusual tread wear and bent rims. To do this, you will have to jack each wheel and get to where your can inspect the inner side of each and spin the tires. Also make sure the wheel bearings are quiet with no appreciable play. Before doing any of this, make sure the TT won't move and is blocked so you don't get crushed.

Over the years, I have run into at least one of each of these problems. I can recall at least three instances over the years where we replaced a tire prior to our travels. It is best to do this inspection a minimum of a week before taking the trip. If there is a problem or a replacement, you will not be pressed for time and make a bad decision.

At virtually every stop we make when on the road, the first thing I do is walk around the trailer, feel the hubs for excessive heat, and a cursory check of tires. Note, the hubs on the sunny side of TT will be a few degrees warmer than the shady side. Tire pressure monitors are a benefit, but we have never used them.

One other caution. Make turns wide enough to avoid contact with curbs. Hitting a side wall or tread on a curb can damage a tire, rim, or both. It may not show at the time, but may cause problems in coming miles. If you have to inconvenience someone by having to back up, do so safely. This will be the last time you will see the grumpy person behind you anyway.

So the name of the game is precaution and caution. Happy travels!
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Old 06-05-2019, 03:47 PM   #6
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Don't be surprised to see the pressures rise 10 PSI or maybe a little more.
Do not worry about that. Tire manufacturers take that into consideration.
Inflate to the recommended pressure on your R/V's tire information sticker or the max inflation on the sidewall, depending on load.
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Old 06-05-2019, 05:42 PM   #7
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Thank all of you for the informative information. I will make sure I follow it, and also think I will get some TPMS on the TT so that I can even monitor while I travel.
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Old 06-05-2019, 06:46 PM   #8
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Your castle rocks will be good if you take care of them. Just changed mine out after 3.5 yrs and probably 13,000+ miles with no problems.
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Old 06-05-2019, 07:13 PM   #9
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Recommend you check tire temperatures after about 20 miles at highway speed and thereafter as necessary for your confidence that they do not overheat. Either stop and use a handheld remote sensing thermometer or use a TPMS and monitor temp and pressure while rolling. TPMS temp readings will require some extrapolation, as the reading at the valve stem is not the same as the reading at the tread. Typically, tire temperature will give some warning prior to catastrophic failure, and slowing down can SOMETIMES avoid failure if you do see overheating at normal speed.
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