Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-30-2017, 09:07 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
cavie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Port Charlotte Fl/Hinsdale Ma
Posts: 4,208
refrigerator. Gas vs electric.

My trailer stays on a permanent site. The electric is metered at commercial rates in MA. $.24 kwh. I determined that it would be much cheaper to run the fridge on propane vs electric. I've been told the freezer won't get as cold on gas. Anybody have experience in this? WH is on gas. Never thought of the fridge.
__________________

__________________
2011 Keystone Sprinter 323BHS
Port Charlotte Fl/Hinsdale Ma
Retired Master Electrician.

I know you believe that you understand what you think I said but I'm sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant
cavie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2017, 10:43 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 11,111
We keep our fridge on elec, LP backup for power outages, and freezer kept things very cold.
__________________

Wiscampsin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2017, 10:50 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
cavie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Port Charlotte Fl/Hinsdale Ma
Posts: 4,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiscampsin View Post
We keep our fridge on elec, LP backup for power outages, and freezer kept things very cold.
My question is, "Does the freezer work equally well on gas."?
__________________
2011 Keystone Sprinter 323BHS
Port Charlotte Fl/Hinsdale Ma
Retired Master Electrician.

I know you believe that you understand what you think I said but I'm sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant
cavie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2017, 11:00 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Waynesville
Posts: 13,890
The answer is Yes! We leave ours set on "Auto" going down the road is just as Cold as shore power! Youroo!! PS Ice cream is Always HARD,and Milk is always COLD!
__________________
youroo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2017, 11:08 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
cavie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Port Charlotte Fl/Hinsdale Ma
Posts: 4,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by youroo View Post
The answer is Yes! We leave ours set on "Auto" going down the road is just as Cold as shore power! Youroo!! PS Ice cream is Always HARD,and Milk is always COLD!
thanks!
__________________
2011 Keystone Sprinter 323BHS
Port Charlotte Fl/Hinsdale Ma
Retired Master Electrician.

I know you believe that you understand what you think I said but I'm sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant
cavie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2017, 12:05 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
rracer5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Full Timing It
Posts: 2,493
Quote:
Originally Posted by youroo View Post
The answer is Yes! We leave ours set on "Auto" going down the road is just as Cold as shore power! Youroo!! PS Ice cream is Always HARD,and Milk is always COLD!

X2
__________________
"PT Crew Members Since 9/2010"
2011 RAM 2500 HD 6.7L CTD Crew
2014 Sanibel 3250
rracer5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2017, 12:21 PM   #7
Site Team
 
Mr. Dan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Grayson County, Texas
Posts: 12,281
Quote:
Originally Posted by rracer5 View Post
X2
X3
__________________
SEARCH is your friend!
FR Wildcat 295RSX / GMC Sierra

Nights Camped: '13 = 49/'14 = 74/'15 = 74/'16 = 85/'17 = 110/'18 =111/'19 = 86; booked = 0
Mr. Dan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2017, 01:15 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Wherever my heart takes me.
Posts: 274
I just learned something about the Norcold Auto (no adjustable thermostat.)

Ended up throwing away more than $100 in food. The unit auto de-thawed.

It has been -4 to -16F actual temps. The unit shuts down at these temps. 80 degrees inside water runs fine. But like extreme high outside temps, low outside temps affect the units cooling capacity.

Been full time just over a year and in hard cold the unit is made for such.

Just never this long in sub zero. The fix is to block outer venting for the unit and a small heater that comes from outside to the roof vent. Not going to do that in these temps. Yet It will have heat coils VS simply summer extra fans to help vent above 95F

Model N611V
Group 150824
Input 1420BTUH
TonyShope is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2017, 01:21 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Worthington, MN
Posts: 212
I think mine freezes better on propane. I would however check your math. I feel your monthly rate fore electricity would be cheaper than a couple tanks of propane. On mine I can go two to three weeks on a 20lb tank at $15.
Bnrc73 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2017, 01:21 PM   #10
Pickin', Campin', Mason
 
5picker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: South Western PA
Posts: 10,473
Often times absorbtion refrigerators (including the freezer) work slightly better on gas. The gas flame makes more heat than the electric element to boil the ammonia.
__________________
_________________________________________
2016 Flagstaff 8529IKBS Diamond Package 5th Wheel-Goodyear Endurance Tires
2017 Ford F-Series SCREW 4x4 - Factory Puck B&W Companion
TST Tire Monitor w/Repeater - Sinemate 3500w Gen.

Days Camped: '16=46 '17=30 '18=51 '19=50
5picker is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2017, 01:29 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Mountainmanbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Lakeside mountains, Calif
Posts: 755
I keep a digital temperature gauge inside the freezer. Runs at around 5 degrees on both elect and gas. No difference.

I think elect is cheaper and use it whenever possible.

M-Bob
Mountainmanbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2017, 01:48 PM   #12
Member
 
Gm Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: East St Paul, Mb
Posts: 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mountainmanbob View Post
I keep a digital temperature gauge inside the freezer. Runs at around 5 degrees on both elect and gas. No difference.

I think elect is cheaper and use it whenever possible.

M-Bob
X2. Gas may do a quicker cool down but otherwise ours is always on AC (auto) and propane backup.
__________________
Mike & Fay
2013 Rockwood 8289 Diamond with 3.5" lift
2017 GMC 2500HD Duramax
2019 Nights booked 74
Gm Mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2017, 02:08 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
cavie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Port Charlotte Fl/Hinsdale Ma
Posts: 4,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mountainmanbob View Post
I keep a digital temperature gauge inside the freezer. Runs at around 5 degrees on both elect and gas. No difference.

I think elect is cheaper and use it whenever possible.

M-Bob
As stated in my post, the electric is commercial rate in the camp and all camps in MA. $0.24 kWh. My home rate is residential in Florida and is $.11 kWh. The break-even point is about $0.15 I'm told. At $.11 kWh it would be cheaper to use electric. Florida has one of the cheapest rates in the National Average.
__________________
2011 Keystone Sprinter 323BHS
Port Charlotte Fl/Hinsdale Ma
Retired Master Electrician.

I know you believe that you understand what you think I said but I'm sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant
cavie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2017, 04:28 PM   #14
Denver, CO
 
garbonz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 2,101
Quote:
Originally Posted by cavie View Post
As stated in my post, the electric is commercial rate in the camp and all camps in MA. $0.24 kWh. My home rate is residential in Florida and is $.11 kWh. The break-even point is about $0.15 I'm told. At $.11 kWh it would be cheaper to use electric. Florida has one of the cheapest rates in the National Average.
Well, it would be interesting to know how the break even point was calculated. Assuming equivalent efficiency for gas and electric, we would need to know the BTU value of the gas as it is applied to the burner, and the BTU value per KW of the electric element.

Any smart engineer out there with the answers? I am an engineer but not so smart anymore.

Or who did the $0.15 calculation?
__________________
2017 Fuse 23T
garbonz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2017, 04:49 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 761
My experience mirrors others here. When we prep for a trip, I turn on the fridge on gas. It seems to cool better and faster than electric. I can also hear the fridge “running “ on gas easier by the sound. I always listen for the flame when I first turn the unit on. I have a question: why are electric rates so high up there? Jay
Jay2504 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2017, 04:53 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
cavie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Port Charlotte Fl/Hinsdale Ma
Posts: 4,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay2504 View Post
My experience mirrors others here. When we prep for a trip, I turn on the fridge on gas. It seems to cool better and faster than electric. I can also hear the fridge “running “ on gas easier by the sound. I always listen for the flame when I first turn the unit on. I have a question: why are electric rates so high up there? Jay
Answer: Taxachusetts and it is commercial rate not residential. The park is a business.
__________________
2011 Keystone Sprinter 323BHS
Port Charlotte Fl/Hinsdale Ma
Retired Master Electrician.

I know you believe that you understand what you think I said but I'm sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant
cavie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2017, 05:27 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
cavie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Port Charlotte Fl/Hinsdale Ma
Posts: 4,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by garbonz View Post
Well, it would be interesting to know how the break even point was calculated. Assuming equivalent efficiency for gas and electric, we would need to know the BTU value of the gas as it is applied to the burner, and the BTU value per KW of the electric element.

Any smart engineer out there with the answers? I am an engineer but not so smart anymore.

Or who did the $0.15 calculation?
Here you go. Now you'll be a smart engineer.

Electric or Propane
__________________
2011 Keystone Sprinter 323BHS
Port Charlotte Fl/Hinsdale Ma
Retired Master Electrician.

I know you believe that you understand what you think I said but I'm sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant
cavie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2017, 05:29 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
cavie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Port Charlotte Fl/Hinsdale Ma
Posts: 4,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mountainmanbob View Post
I keep a digital temperature gauge inside the freezer. Runs at around 5 degrees on both elect and gas. No difference.

I think elect is cheaper and use it whenever possible.

M-Bob
$.24 kWh ain't cheap.

http://www.rollinrollin.com/electricorpropane.htm
__________________
2011 Keystone Sprinter 323BHS
Port Charlotte Fl/Hinsdale Ma
Retired Master Electrician.

I know you believe that you understand what you think I said but I'm sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant
cavie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2017, 05:55 PM   #19
Denver, CO
 
garbonz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 2,101
Quote:
Originally Posted by cavie View Post
As stated in my post, the electric is commercial rate in the camp and all camps in MA. $0.24 kWh. My home rate is residential in Florida and is $.11 kWh. The break-even point is about $0.15 I'm told. At $.11 kWh it would be cheaper to use electric. Florida has one of the cheapest rates in the National Average.
Well, it would be interesting to know how the break even point was calculated. Assuming equivalent efficiency for gas and electric, we would need to know the BTU value of the gas as it is applied to the burner, and the BTU value per KW of the electric element.

Any smart engineer out there with the answers? I am an engineer but not so smart anymore.

Or who did the $0.15 calculation?
__________________
2017 Fuse 23T
garbonz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2017, 06:09 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by garbonz View Post
Well, it would be interesting to know how the break even point was calculated. Assuming equivalent efficiency for gas and electric, we would need to know the BTU value of the gas as it is applied to the burner, and the BTU value per KW of the electric element.

Any smart engineer out there with the answers? I am an engineer but not so smart anymore.

Or who did the $0.15 calculation?
Follow the link just above your post.
__________________

johnbryanpeters is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
electric, fridge, gas

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Forest River, Inc. or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:47 AM.


×