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Old 03-25-2013, 10:07 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by myredracer View Post
CSA is used on products in the US and has been for a while now. It is used in lieu of other safety standards like Warnock Hersey, UL, etc. CSA is recognized for having developed very high/stringent standards and other countries have looked to CSA for guidance in standards and as in the US, has been accepted for use in the US as noted in the following. CSA is one of those things we Canadians can be proud of.

CSA International - Testing and Certification for products sold in the US

277/480 & 347/600 volts are normally industrial/commercial voltages within buildings/structures. Unless travellers go to overseas to Europe and eslewhere, we have the same voltages that RVers and homeowners will use in the US. Not sure what 220/460 is.... One thing that is confusing sometimes is that 120 volts can be referred to as 115 or 110 volts and 240 volts is sometimes 230 or 220 volts.
Well stated
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Old 03-25-2013, 11:03 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by myredracer View Post
CSA is used on products in the US and has been for a while now. It is used in lieu of other safety standards like Warnock Hersey, UL, etc. CSA is recognized for having developed very high/stringent standards and other countries have looked to CSA for guidance in standards and as in the US, has been accepted for use in the US as noted in the following. CSA is one of those things we Canadians can be proud of.

CSA International - Testing and Certification for products sold in the US

277/480 & 347/600 volts are normally industrial/commercial voltages within buildings/structures. Unless travellers go to overseas to Europe and eslewhere, we have the same voltages that RVers and homeowners will use in the US. Not sure what 220/460 is.... One thing that is confusing sometimes is that 120 volts can be referred to as 115 or 110 volts and 240 volts is sometimes 230 or 220 volts.


Should have been more specific
Standard voltage for the US is 208-230/460
Thanks for the write up Very True
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Old 03-26-2013, 06:19 AM   #13
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Thumbs up

As the OP thanks for the replies - very informative
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Old 03-26-2013, 06:33 AM   #14
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CSA,check with (VA Frank) I think it has something to do with the (Civil War)? Youroo!!
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Old 03-26-2013, 07:32 AM   #15
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The main difference is how they run the propane gas to under/inside the trailer from the propane tanks. and if the grounding for the inside electricla system is a floating ground or not, AND if the outlets are the type which are 15/20 amp with only a 15 amp breaker.

CSA requires (IIRCL) non exposed connection for propane, grounded interior electrical system and 15 amp electrical outlets.

You can get CSA (electrical) approval by having your trailer certified by electrical authority Ontario or a similar named group fo around 350 dollars. They send someone to where your trailer is, they have field personnel who do that.

A proper RV shop can easily do the certification for propane/gas for around 120 dolars.

Total cost to get csa certification is around 500 dollars.

If you just take it to a dealer and ask them to do it for you prices will change from 799 to 1,299.


You do NOT need CSA certification to get the trailer registered, or to have it insured or to use it at Canadian campgrounds or to tow it on Canadian roads. It is just built to different standards. It is still safe to use.

No one should ask me what I had to go through learning all this unnecessary stuff.

I was even told I am not allowed to camp in Canadian Camp grounds because if my CSA non compliant trailer caused an electrical problem and burnt all the trailers in a CG I would be on the hook for it. Or I would nver be able to get insurance for it ... I fully explained that the trailer is non csa compliant to my insurer and they said, they knew and it was oki as it was simply built to US standards and they insure those all the time.


I hope this helps a bot ... I might misremember the grounding details if ours is floating or USA standards, but that was one important difference the electrical safety authority explained to me.
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Old 03-26-2013, 08:18 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by youroo View Post
CSA,check with (VA Frank) I think it has something to do with the (Civil War)? Youroo!!
And the Spike Lee movie by the same name.
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Old 10-05-2014, 09:52 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Goomph View Post
The main difference is how they run the propane gas to under/inside the trailer from the propane tanks. and if the grounding for the inside electricla system is a floating ground or not, AND if the outlets are the type which are 15/20 amp with only a 15 amp breaker.

CSA requires (IIRCL) non exposed connection for propane, grounded interior electrical system and 15 amp electrical outlets.

You can get CSA (electrical) approval by having your trailer certified by electrical authority Ontario or a similar named group fo around 350 dollars. They send someone to where your trailer is, they have field personnel who do that.

A proper RV shop can easily do the certification for propane/gas for around 120 dolars.

Total cost to get csa certification is around 500 dollars.

If you just take it to a dealer and ask them to do it for you prices will change from 799 to 1,299.


You do NOT need CSA certification to get the trailer registered, or to have it insured or to use it at Canadian campgrounds or to tow it on Canadian roads. It is just built to different standards. It is still safe to use.

No one should ask me what I had to go through learning all this unnecessary stuff.

I was even told I am not allowed to camp in Canadian Camp grounds because if my CSA non compliant trailer caused an electrical problem and burnt all the trailers in a CG I would be on the hook for it. Or I would nver be able to get insurance for it ... I fully explained that the trailer is non csa compliant to my insurer and they said, they knew and it was oki as it was simply built to US standards and they insure those all the time.


I hope this helps a bot ... I might misremember the grounding details if ours is floating or USA standards, but that was one important difference the electrical safety authority explained to me.
This is a typical play by Canadian Dealers to justify their unresponsiveness if you purchase a trailer in the USA and the exorbitant prices that they charge compared to the USA. For the $500 needed for the CSA certification they generally turn that into a $8000 mark up. Under NAFTA UL and CSA are harmonized and have common certification at the designated labs in both Canada and the USA. I had this story told to me by a dealer this week that I wasn't CSA compliant and immediatly showed them 3 appliances straight off the top with CSA and UL certification with the "C" designation. Most Canadian Dealers are in it to too overcharge , obfusicate and try and justify their unjustifiable prices.
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Old 10-05-2014, 11:07 PM   #18
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It all comes down to Canadian dealers wanting way to much profit, we were at an RV show in Novi MI last week and looking at a Cedar Creek 36CKTS priced at $59000.00, I decided to check out prices in Canada and found one that actually showed the pice $104,959.00, close EH very Canadian and they wonder why we would shop in the US.
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Old 10-06-2014, 10:15 AM   #19
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Even if you have a warranty claim that cant be addressed in Canada you are still a large way ahead because of the ridiculous Canadian Pricing. Forest River warranty also sucks even on brand new units. Essentially the don't honour warranty claims unless you submit them at midnight on Christmas day. They obfusicate and find the most rediculous excuses for claims I have made on two different new units even though they had obvious manufacturing defects that occurred the first and second times that I used the units.
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