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Old 01-02-2013, 09:35 PM   #1
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Suburban furnace will not start.

I have a 2009 flagstaff trailer. That is equipped with a suburban furnace. A bit ago it refused to turn on. Click at the thermostat. Click at the furnace. No blow no fire. After various attempts I poked the fan with a stick and "voila"
Fan blew, pilot ignited, nice warm air.
Now this trick is working but it is taking more and more tries, and after three times I have to disconnect all power and try again.

Now I am leaning toward replacing the motor, but before I do I ranted to see if anyone has had this problem, or had any thought or advice.

Thanks
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Old 01-02-2013, 09:48 PM   #2
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Sounds to me like the motor is bad.
Wiring connection may be suspect as well


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Old 01-02-2013, 09:49 PM   #3
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Welcome to the forums!

I'm not a furnace expert, but I know that the fan has to work and provide air flow to make the 'sail' switch before the gas control valve will open and start the burner ignition. I'm not sure from your description if you have other issues than that.

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Old 01-02-2013, 09:59 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Z3ck View Post
I have a 2009 flagstaff trailer. That is equipped with a suburban furnace. A bit ago it refused to turn on. Click at the thermostat. Click at the furnace. No blow no fire. After various attempts I poked the fan with a stick and "voila"
Fan blew, pilot ignited, nice warm air.
Now this trick is working but it is taking more and more tries, and after three times I have to disconnect all power and try again.

Now I am leaning toward replacing the motor, but before I do I ranted to see if anyone has had this problem, or had any thought or advice.

Thanks
Agree with Dave, I'd first use penetrant lube WD40 or even 3 in 1 oil on fan both shaft ends to free it up. It should spin when prompted not just roll a bit. Sounds like its taking too long to get up to speed and the control times out. Motors usually fail only once, but bearing get gummy and prevent motor from coming to speed. Might (?) save you a bit of cash.
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Old 01-04-2013, 01:05 AM   #5
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Agree with Dave, I'd first use penetrant lube WD40 or even 3 in 1 oil on fan both shaft ends to free it up. It should spin when prompted not just roll a bit. Sounds like its taking too long to get up to speed and the control times out. Motors usually fail only once, but bearing get gummy and prevent motor from coming to speed. Might (?) save you a bit of cash.
Has worked for me more than once on motors ! Jim
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Old 01-04-2013, 07:49 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VinceU View Post
Agree with Dave, I'd first use penetrant lube WD40 or even 3 in 1 oil on fan both shaft ends to free it up. It should spin when prompted not just roll a bit. Sounds like its taking too long to get up to speed and the control times out. Motors usually fail only once, but bearing get gummy and prevent motor from coming to speed. Might (?) save you a bit of cash.
Start with the WD40. It could be something as simple as a little bit of rust on the shaft preventing the motor from running properly. You may need to spin it by hand a few tmes to get the rust out. You should see it around the bearings. Once you no longer see it then use the 3 in 1 or a few drops of a synthetic oil. You want something that will stay in place and not just run off after a few uses.
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Old 01-04-2013, 08:34 AM   #7
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Rather than WD40, use a PTFE based lube, Boeshield T9 is probably one of the best. It will not gum up or attract and hold dirt, grit, or soot.
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Old 01-04-2013, 09:12 AM   #8
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As I've learned on this forum. ...

Wd40 = water disbursement formula 40


Not a lube.

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Old 01-04-2013, 12:16 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by f1100turbo
As I've learned on this forum. ...

Wd40 = water disbursement formula 40

Not a lube.

Turbs

Actually, from the wik! Normally a shaft/bearing like this is designed with extenal lube(oil cup or grease fitting) otherwise its fitted with integral lube impregnated with graphite,
Thus "lifetime bearings". Sometimes they can bind with brass or steel corrosion. This is the reason to use a prnetrant type oil. Spray this stuff in your palm, its oily. Will clean a short term " lube" the bearing.


"WD-40 is the trademark name of a penetrating oil and water-displacing spray. It was developed in 1953 by Norm Larsen, founder of the Rocket Chemical Company, in San Diego, California. WD-40, abbreviated from the phrase "Water Displacement, 40th formula,"[1] was originally designed to repel water and prevent corrosion,[2] and later was found to have numerous household uses.
Larsen was attempting to create a formula to prevent corrosion in nuclear missiles, by displacing the standing water that causes it. He claims he arrived at a successful formula on his 40th attempt.[2] WD-40 is primarily composed of various hydrocarbons.
WD-40 was first used by Convair to protect the outer skin, and more importantly, the paper thin "balloon tanks" of the Atlas missile from rust and corrosion.[2][3] These stainless steel fuel tanks were so thin that, when empty, they had to be kept inflated with nitrogen gas to prevent their collapse.
WD-40 first became commercially available on store shelves in San Diego in 1958.[2]
Contents [hide]
1 Function
2 Formulation
3 WD-40 company
4 References
5 External links
[edit]Function

The long-term active ingredient is a non-volatile, viscous oil which remains on the surface, providing lubrication and protection from moisture.[4] This is diluted with a volatile hydrocarbon to give a low viscosity fluid which can be sprayed and thus penetrate crevices. The volatile hydrocarbon then evaporates, leaving the oil behind. A propellant (originally a low-molecular weight hydrocarbon, now carbon dioxide) provides gas pressure in the can to force the liquid through the spray nozzle, then evaporates away."
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