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Old 08-16-2016, 01:59 PM   #51
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rockfordoo If I had a complete data set of failure and source of manufacture and performed an R squared analysis I suspect there would be a very high coef or correlation to china vs other locations. This analysis would not be impacted by population of the data.

NHTSA tries to do such data analysis but since only a very small portion of RV owners care enough to file complaints that include tire DOT serial numbers even NHTSA can't assemble enough data to find a trend.
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Old 08-16-2016, 02:09 PM   #52
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You CAN conclude these as being root causes (of which there are more than just the 3 you've listed). But you CAN'T conclude it's because it was made in China, which is what people want to "conclude." That's not a root cause.


It doesn't take rocket science to figure out the factory ST tires that come with these trailers are junk. If you don't realize it, you aren't paying attention.

"China" is definitely fashionable to pick on -- and the location a tire is made doesn't itself mean much, however there does seem to be a common theme on these tires.




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Old 08-16-2016, 02:42 PM   #53
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The term "China Bomb" infers 2 things...the tire was made in China and it explodes. With this in mind, I'd be interested to see just how many of these failures would have been simply that...failures...instead of "bombs" had people invested in a TPMS.

And I'd also be interested to know how many trailers ran their OEM tires (another term for "China bombs" for those who care) for years without incident. I have about 2000 miles on my OEM's. I plan to continue to maintain/inspect them properly, keep them covered when parked, keep my TPMS maintained/used and keep my speed at or under 65 mph. After 4 years, I'll change them out...probably for Maxxis or Sailuns or Goodyears...but definitely ST tires.

Oh, and I'll be weighing my rig on Cat scales on my next trip scheduled in October and will make adjustments if needed.

So, as with other tired/overused/misguided labels that people in our society use, please carry on if you must...it's only a reflection after all...
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Old 08-16-2016, 02:46 PM   #54
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It doesn't take rocket science to figure out the factory ST tires that come with these trailers are junk. If you don't realize it, you aren't paying attention.

"China" is definitely fashionable to pick on -- and the location a tire is made doesn't itself mean much, however there does seem to be a common theme on these tires.
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Quality of tires is kind of difficult to determine given that
1. RV mfg select smallest tire that will meet requirements
2. Over half RVs have one or more tires in overload.
3. Many trailer owners operate in excess of tire max speed rating
4. Few owners that have problems bother to file complaints with NHTSA so meaningful data is impossible to get.

Since probably 90% of trailer tires come from China then one shoudl expect 90 % of tire failure reports would be on tires made in China. I could just as easily claim that most RVs have poor quality issues because they are made in Indiana.
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Old 08-16-2016, 04:44 PM   #55
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You have no data to support your #2 statement. That is a ridiculous thing to say.


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Old 08-16-2016, 06:10 PM   #56
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You have no data to support your #2 statement. That is a ridiculous thing to say.
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Sorry but there is data.
RV Safety Education Foundation for the past 20 years has accumulated data from over 35,000 units

In the seminars they give at large rallies across America they presents the facts that show " over 50% of existing RVs exceed at least one safety rating". This quote comes from the above web page. In their seminars this year we see figures such as 57% so the facts clearly support my statement of "over half"

The details from their presentations separates down Motorhomes, Trailers and tow vehicles but shows that both MH and TT have over 50% with an overload situation.
The current data shows that over 50% of RVs have one or more tire and or axle in an overload situation.
Remember this is on units where people know they will have their inflation checked. Tires are cool and these people care enough to pay for the service of getting their units weighed by tire position.

Fact: Very few RVs have axle loads evenly distributed side to side 50/50. Some large RV have discovered 1,000# unbalance.

RVSEF is a recognized 501 (c) 3 organization. Has sponsorship from Rubber Manufacturers Association, Michelin, TireMinder, Bilstein, Bridgestone, Freightliner, Dicor, Hayes brakes, Spartain, Newmar, GEICO, Dexter Axles, Jayco, Thor among others. RVSEF is the only trusted safety and weighing organization fully endorsed by RVIA and RVDA.
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Old 08-16-2016, 06:40 PM   #57
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I assume that the #1,000 overload is based on a static measurement. I have always wondered what that weight would be in one of the sharp corners on the way to the coast! Just guessing that could be 2 or 3 thousand over in that situation.


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Old 08-16-2016, 06:50 PM   #58
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Tireman this seems to me to be a big picture economics issue. Is it true that the auto and truck industry does not experience the failure rate or short life that the ST tires experience? If true then the RV tire industry and rv chassis mfgs apparently are not willing to manufacture to the same expectations of the auto industry leading to all the woes that we experience. Look in any parking lot and many of the cars made before 2007 when tp monitors were required are running on poorly inflated tires. My guess is that these do not fail at the same rate as ST tires. I also have an engineering/QA background and have abused tires for 50 years in racing, towing and with heavy Ag equipment and never seen the failure issues with ST tires. I do properly maintain and store my tires and have had two ST sets fail (2 tires on 1 and 1 tire on the second) in 3 years. Anecdotally I also travel enough to see too many rv trailers on the side of the road with blowouts. If not for economics why would ST tires only be made to be rated at 65 mph when we live in a faster world? I try to stay under this for fuel economy but find myself at higher speeds frequently. Impossible to practically operate within rated limits. Is this whole issue because rv mfgs do not want to pass on the cost of safe tires? I understand Motorhome tire life is 5 to 7 years and tractor trailer operators get hundreds of thousands of miles on tires. ST tires 2 years? Please explain.
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Old 08-16-2016, 07:11 PM   #59
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Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
NHTSA tries to do such data analysis but since only a very small portion of RV owners care enough to file complaints that include tire DOT serial numbers even NHTSA can't assemble enough data to find a trend.
I get tired of hearing that most ST tire problems are caused by the RV owner. I simply don't believe it based on my own experience. NHTSA; never heard of them, much less knew I could file a complaint. So I asked my tire dealer. She said that they do turn in reports on tire problems themselves and/or turn the tires over to their tire reps for analysis. That went for tires they sold or other brands they replaced. So I don't believe the argument that NHTSA doesn't have enough data to see a trend for ST China bombs. Doesn't make sense if tire dealers are turning in info to them to protect their sales and customers.
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Old 08-16-2016, 07:46 PM   #60
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Followup. I bought my 5th wheel to have fun and travel - not to have to research or report tire failure analysis or root cause or replacement equivalents or provide maintenance exceeding that of a 24/7 manufacturing plant. This whole tire and axle business should be engineered into a rolling system that is a non issue and requires little maintenance. Too many of it's customers are seniors that do not want to or know how to mess with this.
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