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Old 09-19-2015, 12:55 PM   #41
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Here is what our tire looked like. Didn't drive very far on it as a trucker flagged us down just after it happwned
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Old 09-19-2015, 12:56 PM   #42
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Another picture. We checked tire pressure before we left and everything was fine
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Old 09-19-2015, 12:57 PM   #43
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Damaged the whole side skirting on the 5er
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Old 09-19-2015, 07:58 PM   #44
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I'm not sure about your unit, but on our 2013 8289, after 2 blowouts , I decided that there was not enough clearance between tires and camper body !! Talked to dealer about this, they agreed and got approval from FR to raise 3 ". After this I u graded to D tires, still Chinese, since then we have over 15,000 miles and no problem. Moral of story, your tires may be rubbing your camper on rough roads and this is destroying them. Check your clearance and talk to your dealer.
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Old 09-21-2015, 12:12 PM   #45
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Originally Posted by Mrs Evans View Post
Well, this last July we decided to replace our OEM tires that we drove with for 2700 miles with tires that the RV Service company we chose recommended to us. I'm not naming names or telling brands but after 1500 miles on these new and "better" tires, we had a blowout. We had just started out for our next destination at 6 am in the morning and after one hour of traveling decided to stop for some breakfast. The blowout happened just before we made it to the Cracker Barrel near a Target parking lot so that we were able to stop almost immediately after the blowout.

We know that we did not hit any curbs with these tires, we always made sure the air pressure was correct and it wasn't a nail or road debris that caused the blowout. I'm positive the tire was defective.

Moral of the story, no matter how hard you try, **it still happens. We put the new spare on and kept going. The real test will be our trip back home. Praying we make it back in one piece. Then we'll talk with our RV service company and see what they say.
I am curious... What was the defect that caused the sidewall failure? Also what was the tire inflation and temperature two minutes before it failed?
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Old 09-21-2015, 12:27 PM   #46
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Tire pressure monitoring systems can save you lots of money and provide peace of mind. Won't keep a tire from blowing, but will give you notice so hopefully you can get off the road before tire explodes.


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Tom I completely agree that a TPMS can provide advance warning of possible tire failure due to leaking air.

I do not agree that it may not "prevent" a tire from failing. Here is an example.

Your cold inflation is 65 psi. When are running down the your normal hot pressure is 70 to 80 psi range. One day you pick up a roofing nail and start loosing air as about 5 psi per minute. Some TPMS will provide warning when the tire looses as little as 3 psi in a couple minutes so your TPM gives you a warning when your tire drops from the hot pressure of 77 to 74. You watch the pressure as you look for safe location to pull over and see a sign for an exit 2 miles down the road. You have slowed down and note that the pressure is now 69 and have only 1 mile to go to get off the exit. You come to a stop and see the pressure has dropped to 59 psi.

A tire that has operated 4 psi under-inflated for less than a mile at reduced speed is just not going to "explode". In fact depending on the size and location of the puncture it might even be reparable and good to keep as a spare tire.

The above is a realistic example of how a TPMS can work and can save you $$$ and aggravation.

If you didn't have the TPM you would have continued driving past the exit at full speed and at 5 psi per minute would certainly experienced a Run Low Sidewall Flex Failure plus possible RV damage withing the next few miles.
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Old 09-21-2015, 12:37 PM   #47
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The pictures provided look a lot like the tire in THIS blog post where better and more pictures allowed a more detailed examination of the suspect tire. The owner of this tire originally expressed a belief that the tire was possibly defective because he had checked the air about an hour before the failure.

The problem is that physical evidence carries more weight that a belief that you can see every screw or nail or piece of metal on the road or that a pressure check in a campground an hour before guarantees that the tire would not loose air at some point in the future.
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Old 09-21-2015, 01:20 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
The pictures provided look a lot like the tire in THIS blog post where better and more pictures allowed a more detailed examination of the suspect tire. The owner of this tire originally expressed a belief that the tire was possibly defective because he had checked the air about an hour before the failure.

The problem is that physical evidence carries more weight that a belief that you can see every screw or nail or piece of metal on the road or that a pressure check in a campground an hour before guarantees that the tire would not loose air at some point in the future.
I'm a firm believer in a system, the system that is a sponsor of your blog has had problems from people statements on this forum. With that being said, I have a digital gauge. I set my pressure from that and then read from the system I have installed. That has given me the plus or minus of the system which they claim can be Plus or Minus 1 or 2 degrees/PSI. Blow outs seem to happen no matter what precautions you take. I have been to the scales I know that I'm not over weight, I know that I have even wear I know what my cold PSI is. So what is a person to do them more then that? I do not have control over the manufacture process, so you trust the dealer and data that they supply. So why are trailer tires so much more subjectible to blowouts then TV tires. a TPMS system can not predict a sidewall blow out. To me that has to be the cord or construction of the tire itself. It will give me a pressure loss and then you still have to slow and pull off in a safe area that's where the damage occurs. So what are we to do or you recommend about that scenario.....Thanks for all your help.
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Old 09-25-2015, 11:55 PM   #49
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I'm a firm believer in a system, the system that is a sponsor of your blog has had problems from people statements on this forum. With that being said, I have a digital gauge. I set my pressure from that and then read from the system I have installed. That has given me the plus or minus of the system which they claim can be Plus or Minus 1 or 2 degrees/PSI. Blow outs seem to happen no matter what precautions you take. I have been to the scales I know that I'm not over weight, I know that I have even wear I know what my cold PSI is. So what is a person to do them more then that? I do not have control over the manufacture process, so you trust the dealer and data that they supply. So why are trailer tires so much more subjectible to blowouts then TV tires. a TPMS system can not predict a sidewall blow out. To me that has to be the cord or construction of the tire itself. It will give me a pressure loss and then you still have to slow and pull off in a safe area that's where the damage occurs. So what are we to do or you recommend about that scenario.....Thanks for all your help.
I have no control on who purchases advertising on the blog I write as I do not own the blog. It is owned by RVTravel. I guess you could consider me like an employee of that company.
I see the claim of +/- 2.7% on pressure and +/- 5F on temp on the TireTraker web site. I haven't conducted tests on accuracy of various TPM systems. Are you aware of any independent tests that have been run?

By "Blowout" I will assume you are talking about Run Low Flex Failure of the sidewall and not the completely different Belt Separation. As such if you can avoid driving at highway speed after the tire has lost significant inflation you can avoid having a Run Low Flex Failure i.e. Blowout. So it follows that if you stop driving on a tire after it has lost 30 to 50% or more of inflation, then you will avoid having a sidewall Blowout.
I know of no part of the tire manufacturing process that can somehow manage to place "defective" material in a consistent circumferential line only in the upper mid sidewall. Also to my knowledge no one has been able to identify exactly what the "defect" is that is located at the site of the melting.
Melting of Polyester cord can occur no matter the size of number of cords if the sidewall is over stressed (bent) at a high rate. It does however take probably about 15 to 25 minutes for the temperature to rise to this level. This type of failure will and has occurred in all brands so again what is the exact defect.
In steel body tires we see the same circumferential line with signs of fatigue failure of the steel cords when they are run when significantly under-inflated. Are you suggesting that the same type of defect that occurs in Polyester is also occurring in steel?

The reason TT have a higher rate of sidewall flex failures than TV is twofold. First a tire loosing air on a TV provides the driver the opportunity to feel the change in ride & handling but provides no such tactical feedback if on a TT. Second is the internal structural stresses that trailer design place on TT tires that it does not experience in as high a level in TV applications. Interply Shear is about 24% higher in TT application than in TV application.

The wear seen in my example does not occur in the 1/4 to 1 mile it might take to come to a stop. It is also not possible to wear uniformly through a tire sidewall if there is no air in the tire to provide the needed support.

If the above is not sufficient I suggest you review the number of posts on Why tires fail on my Blog.
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Old 09-26-2015, 12:20 AM   #50
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Tireman,

I think we all appreciate your knowledge and opinions concerning tire failures.

I just want to say that in my observation your analysis almost always involves something the owner did wrong and seldom ever (at least on this forum) is a defect in the tire that caused a tire to disintegrate. I think the statistics are there to support the fact that the cheaper tires just fail at a higher rate.

You may have the "science" knowledge to support your opinion that it is something the user did or did not do that caused the failure. However some of us folks also know how we treat our tires and some of us know we did all we could to avoid tire failures.

Just saying
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