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Old 08-21-2012, 08:55 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by calberry View Post
Well, let's not be putting words in my mouth

I would suggest that a trailer ought to be simpler than a house (basic heater, A/C and fan). And the trailer, and the Coleman thermostat has, and uses, 6 wires.

The Honeywell comes with 8 screws for 8 potential wires (including one screw that says "Do not use") So right out of the chute I wonder how 8 (or 7) can equal 6. But then the instructions say to use only 4 wires...so now 4=6. New math?

Matching the Honeywell instructions (use the G, Y, W, R) back to the Coleman schematic; G=High Fan, Y=compressor, W=Heat, and R = 12vdc pos. The 2 unused wires are the Blu = vdc neg, and Gray = Low fan. Don't need low fan, and don't know what vdv new does anyway

Am I getting close?

Steve
The present thermostat is also controlling the furnace.
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Old 08-21-2012, 10:15 PM   #12
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Steve, the RTH221B connectors that you describe sound different than the RTH221B that I installed so I'm not sure this will help you. Maybe you have a newer model.

New Honeywell Thermostat (Replacing Coleman Mach)
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Old 08-22-2012, 12:47 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by dunnnc View Post
The present thermostat is also controlling the furnace.
Hmmm, isn't the new also doing that?

Steve
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Old 08-22-2012, 01:02 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Triguy View Post
Steve, the RTH221B connectors that you describe sound different than the RTH221B that I installed so I'm not sure this will help you. Maybe you have a newer model.

New Honeywell Thermostat (Replacing Coleman Mach)

I've noticed that there seems to be a vertical and horizontal version of the RTH221B, and maybe it's just a matter of older vs newer, but indeed this looks EXACTLY like the information Ive been looking for. Thanks so much for sharing!

I can't wait to bring the rig home (CC&R's don't allow me to keep it at home) from storage next week and do the install. I'll let you know how it turns out.

Thanks again!

Steve
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Old 08-24-2012, 10:54 AM   #15
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At the same time I started this thread I also contacted the Honeywell Customer Service Dept. via email. I explained the situation in the original contact email and about a day later I got a response asking for more specific details about both controllers (old and new) as well as the systems being controlled. After providing that info. I received back this response;

"Based on the information provided by you, RTH221B1021 will not be compatible with your system as it operates on a low voltage of 24-30VAC on the other hand your existing thermostat operates on a voltage of 12VDC."

I don't know much about electricity, but I don't understand how a home with 110v can provide 24v to operate the Honeywell thermostat...and of course then I don't understand how others made this thermostat work if 12 vs 24v is really an issue. Is it because the 'back up' batteries are actually providing all the juice to run the thermostat?

Thanks

Steve
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Old 08-24-2012, 11:19 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by calberry View Post
At the same time I started this thread I also contacted the Honeywell Customer Service Dept. via email. I explained the situation in the original contact email and about a day later I got a response asking for more specific details about both controllers (old and new) as well as the systems being controlled. After providing that info. I received back this response;

"Based on the information provided by you, RTH221B1021 will not be compatible with your system as it operates on a low voltage of 24-30VAC on the other hand your existing thermostat operates on a voltage of 12VDC."

I don't know much about electricity, but I don't understand how a home with 110v can provide 24v to operate the Honeywell thermostat...and of course then I don't understand how others made this thermostat work if 12 vs 24v is really an issue. Is it because the 'back up' batteries are actually providing all the juice to run the thermostat?

Thanks

Steve
In a home, they use to and I guess still might, use a transformer. It may be built into the new home units.
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Old 08-26-2012, 05:17 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by calberry View Post
At the same time I started this thread I also contacted the Honeywell Customer Service Dept. via email. I explained the situation in the original contact email and about a day later I got a response asking for more specific details about both controllers (old and new) as well as the systems being controlled. After providing that info. I received back this response;

"Based on the information provided by you, RTH221B1021 will not be compatible with your system as it operates on a low voltage of 24-30VAC on the other hand your existing thermostat operates on a voltage of 12VDC."

I don't know much about electricity, but I don't understand how a home with 110v can provide 24v to operate the Honeywell thermostat...and of course then I don't understand how others made this thermostat work if 12 vs 24v is really an issue. Is it because the 'back up' batteries are actually providing all the juice to run the thermostat?

Thanks

Steve
Steve,
Yes residential furnaces use a 24v transformer. Think of the thermostat as a simple switch. All it does is closes contacts to turn on the fan, furnace or a/c. The batteries will power the stat in your situation. I believe the system operates backwords from a home system, if that makes any sense to you. I hooked up a Robertshaw thermostat on my previous trailer, and am going to try the same on our new 5th wheel. I will post when I acomplish this.
By the way, you lose the two speed fan going to a conventional t-stat unless you hook up a seperate switch.
Ron
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Old 09-04-2012, 01:48 PM   #18
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OK, this is my last post on this subject now that the thermostat is installed (well, unless there is another )

One word (OK, 3); Perfect, wonderful, fantastic

Steve
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