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Old 12-17-2014, 10:43 AM   #41
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I don't understand the advantage of an E rated tire over a D at 65 psi, unless you can buy them cheaper.
I just read a best practices sheet that recommended running tires rated at 20% over the maximum weight rating of the trailer. Maybe a good number of us should be upgrading our wheels and tires to load range E. I am using D rated tires which are rated just a bit of above the max gross weight of my 8280ws. The OEM tires were really mismatched for the trailer.
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Old 12-17-2014, 10:50 AM   #42
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I don't understand the advantage of an E rated tire over a D at 65 psi, unless you can buy them cheaper.
Typically cost a little bit more. They may have a couple more plies in the sidewall and maybe therefore more durable (?) than the D load range. I feel these possible benefits are not truly measurable and once again only a slight benefit over the D load range tire in my application.

I communicated with Maxxis tech support prior to selecting either the D range or the E range 8008 ST tire. The tech said there was no benefit or reason to buy the E range with my RV and its weights, and the limit of the rim at 65 psi max.

I do not fault anyone who chooses to spend the extra money to have an E rated tire and get a perceived peace of mind for it. My peace of mind came from getting the factory C rated off before they could blow and getting a good D rated on.
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Old 12-17-2014, 10:55 AM   #43
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Originally Posted by Fivealive View Post
I just read a best practices sheet that recommended running tires rated at 20% over the maximum weight rating of the trailer. Maybe a good number of us should be upgrading our wheels and tires to load range E. I am using D rated tires which are rated just a bit of above the max gross weight of my 8280ws. The OEM tires were really mismatched for the trailer.
Remember some weight is on the pin. In my case 9500 lbs GVRW. Running my D GY Marathons at 60 psi gives me 9500 lbs on the tires and I have 1800- 1900 lbs on the pin.

9500 - 20% is 1900 lbs. I have 1900 lbs on the pin so I have the 20% margin on maximum tire loading at 60 psi not mention not running the rims at max.
The tire never get hot at 60 psi and trailer runs great and stable.
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Old 12-17-2014, 11:16 AM   #44
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Remember some weight is on the pin. In my case 9500 lbs GVRW. Running my D GY Marathons at 60 psi gives me 9500 lbs on the tires and I have 1800- 1900 lbs on the pin.

9500 - 20% is 1900 lbs. I have 1900 lbs on the pin so I have the 20% margin on maximum tire loading at 60 psi not mention not running the rims at max.
The tire never get hot at 60 psi and trailer runs great and stable.
Forgot about the pin weight! That puts me at 20% over too. It explains why so many are having issues with the OEM C rated tires. This whole matter might be more about overloading than it is inferior tires (not to say that isn't an issue).
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Old 12-17-2014, 11:16 AM   #45
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Reason I went with load range E was that was all discount tire had. I was away from home, had two blown tires on my 8281 ( original tires), and was desperate! Would have gone with D if they had them.


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Old 12-17-2014, 11:23 AM   #46
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my E tires are at 80 pds pressure, that is what the 5th wheel came with, the dry weight of our 5th wheel is 12,800 pds I think. never hurts to go higher on a load rating if you are towing. I would go one more load range up if I could on my rig, just because of all the tire problems we have had. My lesson learned was to replace the original tires on the rig as soon as you get it. I read somewhere that the mfgers pay as little as $25 a tire for what they put on the rigs. consumers need to put pressure on them to put better tires on the rig from the start, it is cheaper in the long run. I tried to get my dealer to find American made tires to put on it in the beginning, they could not find any. found out later, no such thing anymore. that is why I went to truck tires on the rig now. best thing we ever did, it rides better, bounces less, has 3 times the amount of tread on the tire so will last longer, we average over 10,000 miles a year on our rig.
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Old 12-17-2014, 11:30 AM   #47
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I just read a best practices sheet that recommended running tires rated at 20% over the maximum weight rating of the trailer. Maybe a good number of us should be upgrading our wheels and tires to load range E. I am using D rated tires which are rated just a bit of above the max gross weight of my 8280ws. The OEM tires were really mismatched for the trailer.
Yes, as B and B has said remember to subtract the weight of the pin to determine how much weight is on the axles. The C rated tires provided by the factory are then within the standards (just barely) for the load they carry.

Keep in mind too, at least on the Rockwood/Flagstaff ultralites that once a D range tire is installed the load range of the tires is greater than the maximum allowed by each axle. So then, the axle becomes the limiting factor. ( Don't have time right now to find my notes and axle ratings to support that point, but I believe I am recalling it correctly). Also, at the juncture of maxing out the axles or overloading them with too heavy of a load in the trailer you are also surpassing the the GVW allowed for the trailer/frame.

Just to make it simple again, just put on a good D or E load range tire that has a good reputation and weigh your rig. That will give all peace of mind!
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Old 12-17-2014, 11:46 AM   #48
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Yes, as B and B has said remember to subtract the weight of the pin to determine how much weight is on the axles. The C rated tires provided by the factory are then within the standards (just barely) for the load they carry.

Keep in mind too, at least on the Rockwood/Flagstaff ultralites that once a D range tire is installed the load range of the tires is greater than the maximum allowed by each axle. So then, the axle becomes the limiting factor. ( Don't have time right now to find my notes and axle ratings to support that point, but I believe I am recalling it correctly). Also, at the juncture of maxing out the axles or overloading them with too heavy of a load in the trailer you are also surpassing the the GVW allowed for the trailer/frame.

Just to make it simple again, just put on a good D or E load range tire that has a good reputation and weigh your rig. That will give all peace of mind!
By overloading I meant exceeding "best practices" not the rating for the tires. I'm sure the company's attorneys would not allow anything like that. I hope all new owners read and heed the advice in this thread. Having a tire shred the side of your trailer really takes away from the fun you are supposed to be having with these things. Well worth the cost of early tire replacement.
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Old 12-17-2014, 11:59 AM   #49
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This is the story on my 2013 rockwood 5er also. Came with C trail express junk. After first blowout at @ 5500 miles, boom! Now D rated gy marathons.
X2 on both comments AND what OldCoot said!

We played roulette this year and got just over 5K miles out of the stock Lionshead C rated tires.

Like Brian, we will be going to GY Marathon D rated tires (which I understand are made in Gadsten, AL ) and, like OC, metal valve stems.

STRONGLY encourage you to purchase a tire pressure monotering system (TPMS). Most of us use the TST brand [http://tsttruck.com/product/507-starter-system-kit/]

I am tempted to contact TST and see what would be involved in "trading up" from our 507s to the completely internal 510s with brass valve stems (sensors alone cost $310)

Bottom line though, regardless of what tires you buy, you need a TPMS. IMHO, underinflation is the main cause of blowouts regardless of tire quality
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Old 12-17-2014, 12:09 PM   #50
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X2 on both comments AND what OldCoot said!

We played roulette this year and got just over 5K miles out of the stock Lionshead C rated tires.

Like Brian, we will be going to Maxxis D rated tires and, like OC, metal valve stems.

STRONGLY encourage you to purchase a tire pressure monotering system (TPMS). Most of us use the TST brand [http://tsttruck.com/product/507-starter-system-kit/]

I am tempted to contact TST and see what would be involved in "trading up" from our 507s to the completely internal 510s with brass valve stems (sensors alone cost $310)

Bottom line though, regardless of what tires you buy, you need a TPMS. IMHO, underinflation is the main cause of blowouts regardless of tire quality
I had a TPMS sensor on the tire that took out the side of my trailer when a oem tire lost it's cap. Problem was the tire did not deflate and trigger the alarm until I was parked on the side of the road- after the damage was done to the trailer. Tpms is good but does not save you from all things that bad or inappropriate tires can do.
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