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Old 08-31-2017, 03:35 PM   #81
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Originally Posted by timfromma View Post
For me, its not the loss of property, that was unavoidable. It's those who had the ability to evacuate but didn't and now require rescue.


I can understand what your saying about some people in the path of the storm that were told to evacuate and didn't but what you have to realize is that where the most catastrophic damage occurred was way east of the storm, in an area not thought to be in threat.

Houston had a voluntary evacuation. But those of us 300+ miles away were not told to evacuate because historically that distance was safe. They projected 20" rain over all, we got (50"). This storm did not act as any other storm in history and because of what it did, by the time the officials knew it was going to devastate S.E. Texas it was too late. With 12" of rain coming down in one hours time repeatedly there was no time for low lying areas to get out. Once that happened the other surrounding counties should have paid heed but some didn't. Partially peoples fault and local governments fault for not taking action.

Until you have been in those peoples shoes and experienced the vastness of the situation try not to judge. We are high and dry where we are. The communities around us and just 2 miles away people have water to their roof lines they had no time to react once it became apparent the the storm would stall and dump 50" of rain in 3 days. You have no idea how fast this happened to those people. Once the official word came down that flooding was imminent the people tried to leave. The did not give an evacuation order until it was too late. I have been through many prior major floods and I've never seen anything like this. The swiftness of the water and the amount of which in such a very short time. We are an essentially an inland island right now cut off from everyone.

These people have lost everything. I am seeing the horror and devastation first hand of those counties surrounding us. They didn't choose this to happen. Let's not judge or complain about them. How about we pray and offer assistance anyway we can. I will be giving whatever resources I have to help. My heart breaks for those people regardless of the situation.
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Old 08-31-2017, 10:01 PM   #82
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X2!
As of right now, Hurricane Irma is headed across the Atlantic and models predict that it could reach a level 5 status and hit the southeast Atlantic coast of the US, i.e. FL, GA, SC and NC. We'll see if there are any lessons learned.
"If Irma does indeed head for the U.S., pack up and get out before it arrives. Don't wait for a catastrophe that you need to be rescued from."

Ok, let me make sure I understand this: The advice is that everyone in those 4 States get up and leave.

Of course, why didn't I think of that!
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Old 09-01-2017, 01:48 AM   #83
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Dollop, now that the flooding has moved to your area I hope that you high and dry. It appears the winds have eased up so hopefully that didn't become an issue. I'm wishing you well.


Thank you so much CedarCreekWoody We are high and dry. We had torrential rains but the winds weren't too terrible. Lumberton is an island right now. There are three different highways in and out. All three are cut off by high swift moving water over the bridges. My heart and prayers goes out to those caught up in it.
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Old 09-01-2017, 05:54 AM   #84
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I can understand what your saying about some people in the path of the storm that were told to evacuate and didn't but what you have to realize is that where the most catastrophic damage occurred was way east of the storm, in an area not thought to be in threat.

Houston had a voluntary evacuation. But those of us 300+ miles away were not told to evacuate because historically that distance was safe. They projected 20" rain over all, we got (50"). This storm did not act as any other storm in history and because of what it did, by the time the officials knew it was going to devastate S.E. Texas it was too late. With 12" of rain coming down in one hours time repeatedly there was no time for low lying areas to get out. Once that happened the other surrounding counties should have paid heed but some didn't. Partially peoples fault and local governments fault for not taking action.

Until you have been in those peoples shoes and experienced the vastness of the situation try not to judge. We are high and dry where we are. The communities around us and just 2 miles away people have water to their roof lines they had no time to react once it became apparent the the storm would stall and dump 50" of rain in 3 days. You have no idea how fast this happened to those people. Once the official word came down that flooding was imminent the people tried to leave. The did not give an evacuation order until it was too late. I have been through many prior major floods and I've never seen anything like this. The swiftness of the water and the amount of which in such a very short time. We are an essentially an inland island right now cut off from everyone.

These people have lost everything. I am seeing the horror and devastation first hand of those counties surrounding us. They didn't choose this to happen. Let's not judge or complain about them. How about we pray and offer assistance anyway we can. I will be giving whatever resources I have to help. My heart breaks for those people regardless of the situation.
Up to 50" plus was predicted days ahead of the storm.
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Old 09-01-2017, 06:38 AM   #85
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50" of rain is unusual for a hurricane. It only happened because the storm lingered on the coast, which is, again, unusual. Even if they suspect it is going to happen, they can't predict where with any accuracy. Don't believe me? Check the path of Elena.
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Old 09-01-2017, 07:12 AM   #86
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It makes me so Furious I cry to read armchair quarterbacks discuss what they would do in a hurricane. I lived in Louisiana most of my life. They get people all freaked out and here's some single mom with 3 kids spending $1300 to evacuate over and over and nothing happens. Then when they decide they just can't do it again, Katrina hit. I blame a lot of the hysteria on the media and 24 news.
I have gone TO New Orleans several times for a hurricane because everyone's off so we have a big neighborhood BBQ at my daughter's house. We are sitting right there having fun and there's the red and yellow blobs on TV and the weather person in the wind tunnel trying to drum up business, trying to scare everyone to death. I know you can't totally predict the weather, but they could focus on being a little more accurate.
On the Wednesday before Hurricane Katrina Monday I was in New Orleans with my mom. Everything was normal at that time. You can't move that many people that fast. If the people in charge of the levees and pumps did their jobs, a lot of the tragedy wouldn't have happened. I better hang up before I say something ugly.
Unbelievable. I'm at a loss for words.
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Old 09-01-2017, 07:28 AM   #87
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I love all the judgmentalism.

Not everyone who has to be rescued was under evacuation. Hurricane damage and danger is near impossible to predict in size AND location.
So knowing that, the reasonable precaution would be...??

There's an old saying, "Better safe than sorry"
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Old 09-01-2017, 07:30 AM   #88
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That post may have been a bit cavalier, but has some serious underlying truth. I have ridden out four hurricanes. Forecasters do a lousy job predicting the level of damage and where.

I don't think it is incompetence. It is the vagaries of hurricane behavior.

Not everyone who would have benefitted from an evacuation was under an evacuation order. Some were ordered out and did not need to go.

A little less judgmentalism is in order.
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Old 09-01-2017, 07:57 AM   #89
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This post may be going on a lot longer than it should, but with the potential for Irma to make US landfall somewhere, it is still pertinent. Please, folks, don't be too critical or judgmental about people leaving or staying. You never know what you would do if faced with those decisions. I have seen people in Florida being told to evacuate because the storm was predicted to hit their area, only to have the storm move and hit another area, often where they evacuated to! Local governments cannot win for loosing. It takes days to evacuate millions of people out of the area, so if the storm predictions vary at all, some are going to be caught unprepared. In Houston's case with Rita, many were caught on flooding roadways and killed trying to evacuate. I live in the center of the state (Florida) as far as the coasts go, but even tropical storms leave damage and can kill people with trees down on house roofs, local flooding, etc. Some see weathering even a cat 4 as an adventure, and it can be, but the days and weeks after the storm are anything but fun.
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Old 09-01-2017, 08:13 AM   #90
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Originally Posted by Nancyc7 View Post
It makes me so Furious I cry to read armchair quarterbacks discuss what they would do in a hurricane. I lived in Louisiana most of my life. They get people all freaked out and here's some single mom with 3 kids spending $1300 to evacuate over and over and nothing happens. Then when they decide they just can't do it again, Katrina hit. I blame a lot of the hysteria on the media and 24 news.
I have gone TO New Orleans several times for a hurricane because everyone's off so we have a big neighborhood BBQ at my daughter's house. We are sitting right there having fun and there's the red and yellow blobs on TV and the weather person in the wind tunnel trying to drum up business, trying to scare everyone to death. I know you can't totally predict the weather, but they could focus on being a little more accurate.
On the Wednesday before Hurricane Katrina Monday I was in New Orleans with my mom. Everything was normal at that time. You can't move that many people that fast. If the people in charge of the levees and pumps did their jobs, a lot of the tragedy wouldn't have happened. I better hang up before I say something ugly.
I've learned something here:

That the preservation of a human life is not worth $1300, and that when you get enough rainfall and storm surge to fill every NFL stadium, it can all be pumped away by the right people.
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Old 09-01-2017, 09:02 AM   #91
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This post may be going on a lot longer than it should, but with the potential for Irma to make US landfall somewhere, it is still pertinent. Please, folks, don't be too critical or judgmental about people leaving or staying. You never know what you would do if faced with those decisions. I have seen people in Florida being told to evacuate because the storm was predicted to hit their area, only to have the storm move and hit another area, often where they evacuated to! Local governments cannot win for loosing. It takes days to evacuate millions of people out of the area, so if the storm predictions vary at all, some are going to be caught unprepared. In Houston's case with Rita, many were caught on flooding roadways and killed trying to evacuate. I live in the center of the state (Florida) as far as the coasts go, but even tropical storms leave damage and can kill people with trees down on house roofs, local flooding, etc. Some see weathering even a cat 4 as an adventure, and it can be, but the days and weeks after the storm are anything but fun.


When Elena hit Keesler AFB, we were given the choice to leave or to shelter. I chose to shelter. A young lady in the same dorm choose to go home to Florida.

Elena did a 90-degree turn, headed for Florida, and was projected to hit her home. She ended her leave and returned to Keesler.

Elena stopped, did a 180, returned to the precise spot it had been before, made another 90-degree turn, and smacked the mess outta Keesler.

This storm was chasing that poor soul.

Lesson: Stop judging people's hurricane choices. We don't really know what any storm will actually do.
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Old 09-01-2017, 09:12 AM   #92
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<SNIP>

I asked for info on how to secure my new TT just in case we were to get the wind because I didn't know and this has gotten out of control. I am sorry I started such a stir. I wish I hadn't asked in the first place.

So, Della - a update - how are you doing? I hope you are OK and your parents as well

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I see no way to ever actually secure an RV from a hurricane or tornado. High winds.... some of the ideas might possibly help.
Agreed if possible, the only way to secure the RV is to leave.

However, in the OP's case, she had parents and family in the area that could NOT bug out, so she had no choice but to shelter in place

(Although Della, in the future you may want to develop a evacuation plan that includes putting your parents in the back seat, hooking up the TT and bugging out...just in case...always good to have a plan )

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Originally Posted by D W View Post

As of right now, Hurricane Irma is headed across the Atlantic and models predict that it could reach a level 5 status and hit the southeast Atlantic coast of the US, i.e. FL, GA, SC and NC. We'll see if there are any lessons learned.
Yep, now is the time to develop a plan - not a week from now. But, alas, 99% of the folks will not do so.

And now for a little levity for a situation that is all too grim

[QUOTE=Wolverine 1945;1607076]Maybe a little off subject,,,
but how do Tornadoes seem to know where Mobile Home parks are ???[QUOTE]

We have a saying in Alabama...

How are a divorce and a tornado the same?

In both cases, someone is going to loose a trailer!
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Old 09-01-2017, 09:30 AM   #93
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[QUOTE=BamaBob;1611769]So, Della - a update - how are you doing? I hope you are OK and your parents as well



Agreed if possible, the only way to secure the RV is to leave.

However, in the OP's case, she had parents and family in the area that could NOT bug out, so she had no choice but to shelter in place

(Although Della, in the future you may want to develop a evacuation plan that includes putting your parents in the back seat, hooking up the TT and bugging out...just in case...always good to have a plan )



Yep, now is the time to develop a plan - not a week from now. But, alas, 99% of the folks will not do so.

And now for a little levity for a situation that is all too grim

[QUOTE=Wolverine 1945;1607076]Maybe a little off subject,,,
but how do Tornadoes seem to know where Mobile Home parks are ???
Quote:

We have a saying in Alabama...

How are a divorce and a tornado the same?

In both cases, someone is going to loose a trailer!
That is funny then H Bob !!!
I know some people here in the North say that about people in Alabama,,,
But I did not know you talked that way about yourselfs ???
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Old 09-01-2017, 11:07 AM   #94
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Hopefully, after this storm, those local city planners and politicians will understand the errors they've made in the past and don't allow people to rebuild in low-lying areas that are the first to flood in these huge storms. (Frankly, that lesson should have been heard all across North America after Katrina.) We're only going to see more of these big rainfall events in the future. A "100 year storm" is now more like a 10 year storm. So areas deemed "flood plain" are going to have to expand.

However, even if they don't rebuild houses and commercial properties in the low-lying areas, you pretty much have to build water and sewage treatment plants near waterways/waterbodies so they need to figure out how to protect them in order to be able to continue to provide service through these major storms. When the sanitary sewers back up and the contents are floating around in the flood waters, its a serious health hazard.

I also have to say that hopefully private companies running seniors homes do a better job planning emergency evacuation measures. Seeing those pictures of seniors sitting in water above their waists in a nursing home was disgusting. I'd really like to understand how that could happen. We had a fire in a local, government-run nursing home here a couple years ago and the staff did an absolutely amazing job getting those people out and moved to a safe location in short order. They had a plan, practiced it regularly and executed it very well when they needed it.

My thoughts go out to all those displaced by these storms. It's great to see all the videos of neighbors helping neighbors down there. Yes some could have left earlier but chose not to for whatever reason, but many simply don't have the resources. An evacuation on that scale takes a lot of time and coordination. They did a decent job of predicting where this hurricane would hit land but could they have predicted that it would get stuck and drop all that rain for days on end?
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Old 09-01-2017, 11:08 AM   #95
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"If Irma does indeed head for the U.S., pack up and get out before it arrives. Don't wait for a catastrophe that you need to be rescued from."

Ok, let me make sure I understand this: The advice is that everyone in those 4 States get up and leave.

Of course, why didn't I think of that!
It could be good advice for those who don't live there and are parked in RV's. At least they have the means to leave and take their home with them.
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Old 09-01-2017, 11:24 AM   #96
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I was thinking about the same thing last year when at a campground expecting a lot of unexpected flooding rain in a few hours. Campground host said water around many campsites could get to 1 foot deep.
People were scrambling to get out, others were raising campers on blocks.

I put my Travel Trailer (Both tires) as high as I could on blocks. Gained about 6 inches of height. It wasn't needed, the water was only about 4 inches around my camper.

I would keep slides in, get to highest ground or get on blocks, everything locked, and I would think adding weight would help. Fill water tanks etc.
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Old 09-01-2017, 11:48 AM   #97
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Hopefully, after this storm, those local city planners and politicians will understand the errors they've made in the past and don't allow people to rebuild in low-lying areas that are the first to flood in these huge storms. (Frankly, that lesson should have been heard all across North America after Katrina.) We're only going to see more of these big rainfall events in the future. A "100 year storm" is now more like a 10 year storm. So areas deemed "flood plain" are going to have to expand.

However, even if they don't rebuild houses and commercial properties in the low-lying areas, you pretty much have to build water and sewage treatment plants near waterways/waterbodies so they need to figure out how to protect them in order to be able to continue to provide service through these major storms. When the sanitary sewers back up and the contents are floating around in the flood waters, its a serious health hazard.

I also have to say that hopefully private companies running seniors homes do a better job planning emergency evacuation measures. Seeing those pictures of seniors sitting in water above their waists in a nursing home was disgusting. I'd really like to understand how that could happen. We had a fire in a local, government-run nursing home here a couple years ago and the staff did an absolutely amazing job getting those people out and moved to a safe location in short order. They had a plan, practiced it regularly and executed it very well when they needed it.

My thoughts go out to all those displaced by these storms. It's great to see all the videos of neighbors helping neighbors down there. Yes some could have left earlier but chose not to for whatever reason, but many simply don't have the resources. An evacuation on that scale takes a lot of time and coordination. They did a decent job of predicting where this hurricane would hit land but could they have predicted that it would get stuck and drop all that rain for days on end?
In fairness to Houston and surrounding area City Planners, Harvey is now considered to be the Thousand Year Flood. The magnitude of the rainfall had never been seen and impossible to predict.

Planners at least have done a lot of work in past years to get those in he normal flood plains to at least elevate their homes. Homes built in many storm surge prone areas are now designed for the ground floor to be flooded without compromising the main living areas. Raising the utilities (electric, gas, etc) to second floors and having "blow-out" walls on the ground floors that are now utilized as garages, recreation rooms, etc makes for quicker recovery after the storm surge just moves through the lower level.

Harvey is the first of it's kind so hard to blame any "planners".
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Old 09-01-2017, 12:09 PM   #98
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<SNIP>
I would keep slides in, get to highest ground or get on blocks, everything locked, and I would think adding weight would help. Fill water tanks etc.
#1 I always recommend bugging out if you are expecting severe weather when you are in your RV, but if you do decide to ride it out...

It's just the opposite - leave your slides out - will provide additional stability and make your RV less prone to tip over in high winds. Needless to say, all stabilizer jacks and autolevelers down and fully locked

Again, having said THAT your home on wheels has wheels for a reason like Steven said, bug out.

#2 Have a plan (See attached NOAA tip sheet)

Note: this post is referring to people in RV Camps when severe weather is approaching...do you really want this to be YOU?
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Old 09-01-2017, 12:18 PM   #99
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[QUOTE=BamaBob;1611769]So, Della - a update - how are you doing? I hope you are OK and your parents as well



Agreed if possible, the only way to secure the RV is to leave.

However, in the OP's case, she had parents and family in the area that could NOT bug out, so she had no choice but to shelter in place

(Although Della, in the future you may want to develop a evacuation plan that includes putting your parents in the back seat, hooking up the TT and bugging out...just in case...always good to have a plan )



Yep, now is the time to develop a plan - not a week from now. But, alas, 99% of the folks will not do so.

And now for a little levity for a situation that is all too grim

[QUOTE=Wolverine 1945;1607076]Maybe a little off subject,,,
but how do Tornadoes seem to know where Mobile Home parks are ???
Quote:

We have a saying in Alabama...

How are a divorce and a tornado the same?

In both cases, someone is going to loose a trailer!
LOL...thanks we needed that!
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Old 09-01-2017, 12:36 PM   #100
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BamaBob We are fine. We were high and dry in or part of town, other were not so lucky. We are trapped here in Lumberton because of the flooding and two of three bridges into and out of Lumberton are compromised. Third one they won't know until water recedes off of it and they can inspect it. We can't get supplies for grocery stores and pharmacies. People are were not prepared are starting to freak out a bit. Thank you for asking.
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