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Old 08-12-2010, 01:46 PM   #1
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Surveyor Sport for full-timing?

In the current weird economy, I'm considering selling my house (to get out from under the mortgage) and living in a trailer full-time. Just me and a 50lb Collie, so we don't need much room. But a lot of the smaller trailers seem designed for weekend use. The new SP-230 has one of the best floor plans for full-timing that I've seen so far (in a trailer that size). A real pantry in the kitchen and lots of closets. If I can get enough equity out of my house to afford one, it's currently toward the top of my list. But have a couple of questions:


The factory brochure lists it as having a "Domestic, flush-mount refrigerator". How many cubic feet are the refrigerator and freezer? Is it a dual 110 volt/ LP, or a three way 100volt/12volt/LP model?


The 25 foot and over models are listed as having more roof insulation. The SP-230 has a 23' body and is just over 25' in overall length, so does it have the extra insulation?


Any general thoughts on whether a Surveyor Sport is suitable for full-timing? To begin with, I would anticipate that it would mostly be living in a RV park, with occasional short vacation trips. If the business I work for doesn't survive the economy, then it might wind up as a road vehicle.


Thanks
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Old 08-12-2010, 04:19 PM   #2
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Can't help much, but a few recommendations. I see in the brochure, a double door refer option, get that. Also get the bigger AC. As for full timing, you can do it in a tent, you will have to figure out what you need, NEED, not want. Get an electric heater or two, as propane furnaces love gas, and it isn't cheap. Stay in a park with electricity included in the price for the site, maybe. Make sure you can tow what you are getting ready to buy, and if the tow vehicle is questionable, better rethink those trips. Go see one at a dealer, and ask a lot of questions. Good luck.
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Old 08-12-2010, 05:51 PM   #3
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If you figure $20/night, that's $600/month. Does the math really work?
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Old 08-12-2010, 06:29 PM   #4
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$20/night?? I priced a couple of local RV parks, and the expensive one was $350/month with all utilities included. This is less than I'm paying now.

If times got really tight, then there is also the possibility of getting permission to park somewhere for free, or staying somewhere I could pay the land owner a small fee for one extension cord to run the A/C. That would mean bi-monthly(?) trips to a RV dump station, but would way cheaper than my current situation.
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Old 08-15-2010, 09:04 AM   #5
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The Sport versions of the Surveyor line does not have the enclosed underbelly. So holding tanks will not be insulated or heated. The same goes for the waterlines if they run under the rig and not inside. That also affects heating on cold nights. You don't state where you are from ,but something to think about. We can camp almost year 'round here in Alabama. That is what stopped us from trading our 2007 SV291 in on a 2010 Sp293 this year. If they ever bring the 293 to the SV lineup, it's ours.
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Old 08-15-2010, 10:26 AM   #6
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If you lose your job and cnnnot afford to pay the camping fees. you could consider becoming a working camper. You work for the campground for your site. If you exceed the hours needed to pay for the site most campground will pay you with a voucher that can be used for propane and items from the camp store.
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Old 08-16-2010, 11:17 AM   #7
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I live in East Texas, so we usually only get a hard freeze every few years (although I might need to rig some sort of insulation for those occasions).

Working at a campground would certainly be an option. But a lot of the small town businesses around here are on there own land, so getting permission to park from a regular employer is not out of the question. My current employer would happily go for the idea, expect that we're in a shopping center and our landlord doesn't want us to sneeze unless we talk to a lawyer and get insurance coverage first. Our old landlord probably wouldn't have objected as long as the trailer could be tucked out of the way and didn't block access for cars in the lot.

Warning: Political Content follows. The new mandatory Health Care coverage, which costs employers much money and therefore employees many jobs, cuts in at 30/hours a week. I can envision many RVer's working for 29/hours a week and, err, "hanging around the store" for another 10 hours. I can also envision many employers suddenly deciding that having an RV parked next to the building, and providing one extension cord to power the A/C, isn't really any trouble at all. Be careful how everyone words that, however. If the IRS decides that your parking space is worth $300/month, then you will owe taxes on the income.
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Old 08-16-2010, 03:05 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bamasurveyor View Post
The Sport versions of the Surveyor line does not have the enclosed underbelly. So holding tanks will not be insulated or heated. The same goes for the waterlines if they run under the rig and not inside. That also affects heating on cold nights. You don't state where you are from ,but something to think about. We can camp almost year 'round here in Alabama. That is what stopped us from trading our 2007 SV291 in on a 2010 Sp293 this year. If they ever bring the 293 to the SV lineup, it's ours.
I have an SP-189. Though it doesn't have heated tanks, it DOES have an enclosed underbelly.
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