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Old 10-10-2011, 01:23 AM   #1
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True dry weight of SP275?

We're thinking of buying a Surveyor SP275 but I'm worried that it won't be close to the advertised spec of 3985 lbs dry weight. Does anyone know what the dry weight of their SP275 really is?
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Old 10-10-2011, 08:36 AM   #2
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Always error to the heavy side.
uvw does not include dealer installed options.
such as propane tanks full of propane.
sometimes jacks
tvs
battery
spare tire possibly
It all adds up fast and if your close at dry weight you'll most likely be over at delivery.
Imho
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Old 10-10-2011, 08:45 AM   #3
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Recently saw a new Jay Feather.
It had a tag on the inside of the screen door that listed
the weight and it specifically said with full LP.
Then it gave the weight of the water and finally the remaining cargo capacity.

Don't know if all new trailers have this kind of tag but it's a great idea if the
numbers are right!

Have you looked at the weight tags on the trailer you're interested in?
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Old 10-10-2011, 12:47 PM   #4
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We're just now 'sort of' settling on the SP275 so I haven't specifically looked at one. We've looked at many other TTs though and I'm well aware of the labels placed on them. I've found that MOST of them are within a few hundred pounds of the spec weights. Now a days it's much more common for many less things being installed by dealer so most of the labels I'm told are pretty accurate (disregarding LP, etc).

What I'm trying to do now is elliminate the ones that just won't work. The Sp275 seems to spec weight of 3950 lbs is a little over 1000 lbs below my tow limit. But I really don't want to get much above 4000ish.
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Old 10-10-2011, 01:15 PM   #5
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My stickered dry weight was 330lbs over the brochure's listed dry weight because of the options I added when ordering. Add in two 6-volt batteries and propane and the dry weight is even higher.

In your case, I would plan that the trailer will weigh several hundred lbs more than the brochure weight coming out of the factory and then add in batteries and your cargo. The "towing" weight for your trailer when its ready to go camping will probably be close to your TV's limit of 5,000 lbs.
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Old 10-10-2011, 02:32 PM   #6
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If you are that close to the "dry" weight then loaded ready there is no way you will be able to tow it. To be sure always error on the heavy side. In other words, look at the trailers GVWR. That is the number your TV needs to pull around. Not some mystical "dry" or "shipping" number.
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Old 10-10-2011, 02:47 PM   #7
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My tow rating is a little over 5000lbs w/o weight distributing hitch. The TTs I'm looking at are about 4000lbs dry weight/unloaded weight. I'm good if I can find out how close the actual unloaded weights have been to the spec given. Based on other models, the delivered weight is about 300 to 400lbs of listed dry weight.

Using the trailer GVWR is absolutely NOT the number to use. It is a rating based on axle capacity, trailer frame, etc. It can be as much as twice the actual weight (dry, unladened, unloaded, loaded or otherwise). It is simply the absolute maximum weight the trailer could carry based on the components of the trailer. One could look at it as the ability to carry cargo and for some models in the 4000lb range that would give you 2000++lbs of cargo. Not realistic for any normal camper I've meet. A typical cargo weight would be more in the 400 - 750lb range for a 24ish foot trailer.
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Old 10-10-2011, 03:19 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clarkgriswold View Post
My tow rating is a little over 5000lbs w/o weight distributing hitch. The TTs I'm looking at are about 4000lbs dry weight/unloaded weight. I'm good if I can find out how close the actual unloaded weights have been to the spec given. Based on other models, the delivered weight is about 300 to 400lbs of listed dry weight.

Using the trailer GVWR is absolutely NOT the number to use. It is a rating based on axle capacity, trailer frame, etc. It can be as much as twice the actual weight (dry, unladened, unloaded, loaded or otherwise). It is simply the absolute maximum weight the trailer could carry based on the components of the trailer. One could look at it as the ability to carry cargo and for some models in the 4000lb range that would give you 2000++lbs of cargo. Not realistic for any normal camper I've meet. A typical cargo weight would be more in the 400 - 750lb range for a 24ish foot trailer.
OH so sorry to disagree with you. Terms like "dry" or "shipping" are totally meaningless. No one ever tow a trailer that will be even close to those mystical numbers. Since it is almost impossible to calculate the weight of things a person may or may not put in the trailer how can you even figure what you actual camping weight is? With no other information a person should always use the GVWR to determine what your maximum loaded ready to camp weight will be. At least using that number a person will never have too little tow vehicle. Not like your theory of using some mystical number to try and determine how much a trailer might weigh.
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Old 10-10-2011, 03:39 PM   #9
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We're not going to agree but I'll state it briefly.

If you use GVWR of the TT you'll be vastly over estimating. I will agree that if you use it you're TV will never have an issue. But that's not really practical to 'over design' at the cost it can create.

Weights are accurate if you understand what they are measuring. Today's mfg place actual weights w/o cargo but do include standard equipment. Standard equipment on today's TTs includes A/C and other heavier items. A reasonable approach is to use mfg weight (dry weight), add dealer installs (LP, batteries, etc), and the add a reasonable cargo weight. What I'm looking for is what some people have found their TT to weight 'off the lot' ....w/o cargo. I can quickly estimate cargo. If that figure is even close to the TT GVWR you've bought an underdesigned TT or have way too much cargo for the typical traveller.

Again, I don't think we'll agree but I hope your travels are safe and happy.
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Old 10-10-2011, 04:01 PM   #10
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And using your idea is going to send people in to under rated TV's for the load they actually have. This stuff is not rocket science. It is however crucial to have sufficient TV for the intended load. Making wild guesses is not prudent for 99% of the people who post/read these forums. And advising them to use unrealistic terms like "dry" or "shipping" will only lead them down a path toward a costly mistake. You can do what you choose as I will. I do not expect to convince you that you are wrong, however consider the fact, "dry" weight is a number placed on the unit at the time it was designed, maybe the first unit off the assembly line. But more likely it is a calculated number based on the assumed weights of the individual components. These numbers are notoriously inaccurate and should never be used. I do understand that manufacturers have started adding a weight as it supposedly comes off the assembly. Again that number is not going to be very accurate. Add a couple hundred pounds of food, clothes not to mention dishes, TV, maybe a second TV a satellite receiver, a satellite dish, oh don't forget the awning and then go get an accurate weight as the trailer is ready to camp. I would be very surprised if you are not actually very close to the trailers GVWR. So why not simply forgo all the hassles and use the GVWR as a base line for what you will be towing?
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