Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-02-2018, 01:15 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 56
Talking Boy Scout Class A Spare Tire

For 31 years I've owned travel trailers and have always had a spare tire. Two years ago we bought a new Class A Motorhome and we were told it doesn't come with a spare tire and you really don't need one anyway. Growing up as a boy scout "being prepared" was instilled in my brain. Driving cross-country in some desolate areas it crosses my mind on what am I going to do if I have a flat tire? I have no spare. I know that even if I had a spare tire I would not be able to change it myself. But I'm curious on what your opinion is not having one. I see many MH's on the road that do not have one. Should I buy a spare for peace of mine or is it a waste of money because I won't have issues getting a flat fixed from a tow truck, with them not having difficulties having a replacement tire. And then I also think, what if for some reason my rim was damaged from the flat tire.

Thanks for your input
Georgetown 30x3
__________________

Ready2camp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2018, 01:30 PM   #2
Berkshire 390QS
 
NO3putt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,422
A couple of things to think about:
1. Have room to store?
2. Do you have the tools to change it?
3. Can you change it on the side of road?
__________________

__________________
2011: 54 days, 2012: 218 days, 2013: 175 days, 2014: 196 days
2015: 188 days, 2016: 72 days, 2017: 185 days: 2018 182 days
2019: 156 days (2009 Berkshire, 390QS, and toad)
NO3putt is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2018, 01:37 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 56
Like I said, even if I had a spare I wouldn't be able to change it myself and I see online you can purchase a spare tire bracket that fits in the receiver of the hitch. Again, my question is, is it worth the cost of buying a spare or do people never have issues having a flat fix without you providing the spare. Relying on the tow truck to find your type of tire or maybe having to find a rim too.
Ready2camp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2018, 02:00 PM   #4
Head Rambler
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Southwest Alabama
Posts: 7,043
There are several discussions about this very thing here. The latest I recall was that maybe having a spare wheel without the tire was probably the best thing as the tires should be easy to find, but wheels, especially if they're aluminum, may not be readily available everywhere.
__________________
Salem 29RKSS Pushing a GMC Sierra 2500HD!
Gotta go campin!
Bama Rambler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2018, 12:54 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 382
The Road Master spare tire carrier is on my wish list.

There is NO place in the basement to carry the tire. Even if there were, I wouldn't use it. 20 years ago I carried a spare in the basement. It was a real chore getting it in and out to check psi.

The Road Master is expensive, but very usable as I won't have to lift the tire and slide it into the basement. With the lever attachment, the tire can be lowered/raised "easily" into position.

I look for them occasionally as used items. I never see them offered.

Having had 6 blow outs on a class A, I know for sure that carrying a spare simplifies life. You can change it or roadside assistance can change it and you are on your way.

I've purchased the socket, 1/2" extensions, 1/2" ratchet, 24" breaker bar, and 5' cheater pipe. All are loaded in the class A. Next I'll need the tire carrier.

If I can get roadside assistance, they will change the tire. However, many places I go the avaliability of roadside assistance is thin to not available. I have actually been told by roadside assistance, "We can't locate assistance for you. After you find assistance, pay them and send us the bill. We'll reimburse you." (paraphrased) In this case, I'll be prepared to change my own tire or accept the assistance of a good samaritan who'll use my tools and spare tire to get me rolling.
__________________
McCormickJim
2017 GT 31L5
McCormickJim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2018, 01:42 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 2,100
I've been wondering something similar with respect to the travel trailer. It has a spare and I carry tools: breaker bar, socket, extension, and torque wrench. But the jack I use at home is a 73 lb. trolley jack. I don't want to travel with that. What do others do?

Larry
Larry-NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2018, 01:54 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: N. j.
Posts: 110
Have the road master spare tire carrier on my Berkshire .works well blue ox tow bar fits into it with a 22.5 wheel and off brand tire under a grand
Blazer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2018, 02:44 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 887
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry-NC View Post
I've been wondering something similar with respect to the travel trailer. It has a spare and I carry tools: breaker bar, socket, extension, and torque wrench. But the jack I use at home is a 73 lb. trolley jack. I don't want to travel with that. What do others do?

Larry
I just use the Jack that comes with my truck. If it can lift a corner of a 1 ton dually, it can lift my TT.
Springerdad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2018, 05:00 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 2,100
High enough?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Springerdad View Post
I just use the Jack that comes with my truck. If it can lift a corner of a 1 ton dually, it can lift my TT.
Does it lift high enough to get the tire clear of the ground? Do you put it right where the spring is shackled to the axle? I don't think our truck jack could lift the truck or the trailer from the frame.

Larry
Larry-NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2018, 05:00 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Friendswood Texas
Posts: 107
we just Brough a coachmen Mirada 35Kb I made them to through in a spare tire and rim. I did not want to pay double om the road for a tire.
__________________
John and Diana Embrey Texas 2019 Coachmen Mirada 35 KB
cruiserjohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2018, 05:23 PM   #11
Member
 
Fishtexx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 95
If you have a tandem trailer, this is the ticket. Google Trailer - Aid
If you own a Class A, go to a truck shop and just move a tire and wheel assy, much less lift one. Big lug nuts, very tight (200 ft lbs?) Much more than I would want to mess with on the side of the road, and I'm 6' #180 and in pretty good shape. I would look into Road side assistance plans.
__________________
Terry and Laurie
2017 Flagstaff 27RLWS
2018 F-250 6.7 4X4 Crew
Fishtexx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2018, 06:34 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
grumpy0374's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1,452
Even if you can't change it yourself, best to carry a spare tire and rim, or at least a good unmounted spare tire.
You may have a roadside service, but you may be at the mercy of whatever service shows up as to what type/quality tire they bring. Yes, your service will cover the assistance, but you have to pay for the tire.
Many companies will bring you out whatever tire you request, but if your stuck somewhere where their isn't a big choice of tires, you'll end up whit whatever is brought to you.
Then there's the cost of the tire, that you have no control over. Service company may be honest with you or screw you royally.
Carrying your own spare/tire will take care of a problem like this.
We have a class c, and luckily I'm still able to change a flat on my rig. But even if I couldn't, I'd still carry a spare.
Grumpy
__________________
Steve & Cheryl + Zoey, and Ziggy, our furry kids.

2012 Forrest River Lexington 283ts
Toad, 2013 Subaru XV Crosstrek
grumpy0374 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2018, 06:59 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Out West Somewhere
Posts: 163
I owned various Class A's for 18 years, my last one was a diesel pusher for 10 years.

While I could manage the 16" tires on my first two Class A's, there was no way I could handle the 22.5" tires on my DP. Each tire/rim assembly weighed over 250 pounds!

Turns out that the 22.5" tires are very common in the 18 wheeler world. Most of the roadside assistance companies that handle diesel trucks carry a spare tire with them.

In my 40 years of RV'ing, I have never had a tire go out on me (quick, knock on wood here). Most tire failures are due to over weight rigs, under-inflated tires, or old tires. RV tires should be changed every 6 to 7 years regardless of mileage. RV's should be weighed, fully loaded and ready to go, and the weight compared to the tire manufacture''s recommended tire pressure.
WayneLee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2018, 08:31 PM   #14
Bene Gesserit Rule
 
Murbella7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Victoria, Australia
Posts: 845
My question to you is why can't you change a tire?

Is it a physical limitation (your body can't handle the work)?
Is it a lack of the right tools?
Is it lack of knowledge?

If it is either of the last two then that is fixable, you buy the right tools, you learn how to do the job. If it is because you are physically unable to do the work then you have no other option but have a really good and reliable roadside service agreement.

I would still have a spare wheel, because as has been said, even roadside assist won't help if there is no spare.

I don't like the idea of having just a wheel rim and no rubber. That makes it too hard. Someone would have to get the wheel into the next town (that has a tire place), to get rubber. That could be many, many miles away and the road you break down on will always be the one furthest away from help and with the least amount of (friendly) traffic.
Murbella7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2018, 08:36 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 2,100
When?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Murbella7 View Post
I don't like the idea of having just a wheel rim and no rubber. That makes it too hard. Someone would have to get the wheel into the next town (that has a tire place), to get rubber. That could be many, many miles away and the road you break down on will always be the one furthest away from help and with the least amount of (friendly) traffic.
on the first day of a four-day holiday weekend.

Larry
Larry-NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2018, 08:40 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Novi, MI USA
Posts: 311
Send a message via AIM to NoviBill
My take - If you have the background (or want to develop it) to change a tire, carry one along with the gear required. Otherwise carry a few cans of fix-a-flat and get a good TPS (more likely to prevent an issue with good tire pressure). The nice thing about being in a MH is you have food, water and a bathroom. Waiting 24 hours is not a major.
__________________
=================================
Bill & Renee from Novi, Michigan
2006 Lexington 255DS
=================================
http://anunbalancedbalance.blogspot.com/
NoviBill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2018, 11:43 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 725
Having a 19.5" tire fail on my class A Georgetown is one of the disasters I've always been afraid of. I've been fortunate that, in seven years of ownership, I haven't had this happen although I was within 100 miles of a right front blowout when the rig was only a year old with around 18,000 miles on it. (A very very bad alignment problem caused this.) I've been looking for a solution to the spare issue and, from a lecture I attended earlier this year, found out the following:
1. Emergency road service will replace your blown tire with your mounted spare.
2. Emergency road service will replace your blown tire with your unmounted spare and will charge you to unmount the blown tire and mount the replacement.
3. Emergency road service will bring you a replacement tire, maybe one that matches the one that's blown and do the unmount/mount job. You'll pay for the tire and the labor to install it.
4. If a tire isn't available, you might need to be towed off the road. Hopefully the tow will be covered.

The Roadmaster spare tire holder is a great product but I'm not sure I'd want to add over 300 lbs of weight to the back end of the towing hitch. That's a lot of weight located beyond the back end of the rig and should effect the weight distribution on the wheels. An alternative I've just come across is a bracket assembly that holds the spare between the chassis rails. It's attached to the sidewalls (or framing?) on both sides of the rig with a latch on one side and a hinge of the other side. The tire is on a slide so you can unlatch one side and slide the tire to that side so you don't need to crawl under the rig. Best of all, this costs a lot less than Roadmaster's product.

Phil
pmsherman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2018, 07:03 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Friendswood Texas
Posts: 107
Where can you get this mount you are talking about and what is the product name?
__________________
John and Diana Embrey Texas 2019 Coachmen Mirada 35 KB
cruiserjohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2018, 07:25 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 887
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry-NC View Post
Does it lift high enough to get the tire clear of the ground? Do you put it right where the spring is shackled to the axle? I don't think our truck jack could lift the truck or the trailer from the frame.

Larry
It's small enough in diameter that I can put it right under the spring plate, so I'm lifting it without the risk of deforming the axle. The last time I used it, I put a short section of 2x6 under it for a little more height. Picked it up plenty high enough to change the tire. My truck is a 2014 GMC dually diesel. It took less effort to lift the TT than it does to lift the front wheel on the truck. The jack is compact, all the other pieces come apart so it takes up little space. (It stores under the back seat of the truck, a factory design)
Springerdad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2018, 09:35 AM   #20
Senior Member
 
satdog01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Franklin, TN
Posts: 663
I carry a 6 ton hydraulic jack and use 4 x 6 block that I use under Stabjacks when I can get in safe place and do not want to wait the hour plus for the Roadside assistance I do pay for. Only had to do once when China Bomb hit trash on road and blew. Carry half inch set of tools for this and to torque lug nuts and check bolts on running gear - Blue Ox on long trips.
__________________

__________________
2020 Georgetown 31L, Safe T steering, Onan Geny
2015 GMC TOAD w/Blue Ox tow plates
Pepper 🌶 Pomeranian rescue 327 nights as camping buddy
Days camped in FR, 2011-12 = 77, ‘13 = 59, ‘14 = 39
‘15 = 52, ‘16 = 77, ‘17 = 81, ‘18 = 44, 2019 = 83
Retired :
satdog01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
class a, tire

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Forest River, Inc. or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:34 AM.


×