Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-05-2016, 09:28 AM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 35
You are missing a key piece of equipment. You also need a 150 Ft lb torque wrench. Home Depot has one at a reasonable price. Impact wrenches are fine for getting wheels off but not for putting them back. Check the torque rating for the size wheel stud and torque to that in steps. My number is written inside the coach compartment where I keep the bottle jack and some blocking. I did both dual wheels when I put on the valve stem extenders all units also need.
__________________

__________________
nothermark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2016, 09:24 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Novi, MI USA
Posts: 194
Send a message via AIM to NoviBill
Comments from he loyal opposition...

I am in good health and relatively fit and am not bad with a wrench. I purposely do not carry the equipment required to change a tire because it would tempt me to do it.

Lots can go wrong both as you are changing the tire and if you don't tighten to spec it gets worse...

My two cents: If you are highly mechanical and already own the right equipment for other work, go ahead. If you are an office worker who can turn a wrench but don't really have the background (me) leave it to a someone who does it well (worst case is you have to campout for another night ).
__________________

__________________
=================================
Bill & Renee from Novi, Michigan
2006 Lexington 255DS
=================================
http://anunbalancedbalance.blogspot.com/
NoviBill is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2016, 09:28 PM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by grumpy0374 View Post
Davidjeff, I think you may be a bit disappointed in the Ryobi with only 300 ft lbs of torque. The Kobalt corded has 350 ft lbs, and does an adaquate job. Dewalt also has a 350 ft lb corded wrench. And the Kobalt 24 volt battery 1/2 inch has around 600 ft lb rating. I'm not saying they are the best, just the most powerful, and its better to get the most powerful from the start, rather than spend money on something that may or may not be adaquate.
300 ft lb may or may not do a proper job of taking the lug nuts off and then back on. Hope I'm wrong, but it may not have the power needed to do a proper job.
Grumpy
Upon more thinking I went and purchased one of the Kobalts you spoke of, at 650 ft lbs and only $249 with battery, charger, tool and bag it's a real bargain, guess the Ryobi will be relegated to home stuff
__________________
Davidjeff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2016, 09:47 PM   #14
Member
 
knockando's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoviBill View Post
Comments from he loyal opposition...

I am in good health and relatively fit and am not bad with a wrench. I purposely do not carry the equipment required to change a tire because it would tempt me to do it.

Lots can go wrong both as you are changing the tire and if you don't tighten to spec it gets worse...

My two cents: If you are highly mechanical and already own the right equipment for other work, go ahead. If you are an office worker who can turn a wrench but don't really have the background (me) leave it to a someone who does it well (worst case is you have to campout for another night ).
You know I was just starting to think the same thing! Roadside assistance should be good (until I drive to Alaska). Thanks for all the great responses, this is such a great place for second year rv'r.

__________________
knockando is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2016, 09:53 PM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by knockando View Post
You know I was just starting to think the same thing! Roadside assistance should be good (until I drive to Alaska). Thanks for all the great responses, this is such a great place for second year rv'r.

I carry State Farm on the MH and for pennies less than $1 a month I have roadside, lockout,towing (unlimited), fuel, jump starts etc... we also have AAA covering the same cause my DW travels a lot in here job. I still personally want to be prepared in case I don't have time or cell service etc... for tire replacement.
__________________
Davidjeff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2016, 06:46 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
grumpy0374's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 817
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoviBill View Post
Comments from he loyal opposition...

I am in good health and relatively fit and am not bad with a wrench. I purposely do not carry the equipment required to change a tire because it would tempt me to do it.

Lots can go wrong both as you are changing the tire and if you don't tighten to spec it gets worse...

My two cents: If you are highly mechanical and already own the right equipment for other work, go ahead. If you are an office worker who can turn a wrench but don't really have the background (me) leave it to a someone who does it well (worst case is you have to campout for another night ).
To each his own.
But, be aware, you might be sitting, waiting for hours on the side of a road waiting for roadside assistance. And, if you have roadside assistance, check with them as to their policy about getting the right help to you. Many companies that respond to a call WILL NOT change a the inner dual tire if it is the one thats blown. And if you don't have a spare tire, you are at the mercy of the company and what they charge for bringing you a tire.
If your physically able too, and have the proper tools, you can be on your way in around 1/2 hour. It's not rocket science, and just like changing the tire on your car, just a bit bigger and heavier. As to tightening it to "spec"...its a steel wheel. I've always just used my electric impact wrench to tighten the lugs down. Unless you keep cranking/impacting after their tight, your not going to overtighten them. Your reading too much between the lines as to what you need. Just simple basic equipment.
And, for info, I'm 66 years old and still able to, and will not hesitate to change my flat if I have one, nor will I hesitate to help someone else.
Grumpy
__________________
Steve & Cheryl + Charlie & Casey, our furry kids.

2012 Forrest River Lexington 283ts
Toad, 2013 Subaru XV Crosstrek
Camping trips this year so far...8
Days camping...75
grumpy0374 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2016, 08:05 AM   #17
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 35
I carry the tools because I might not want to wait or might not be able to get help to where I am. All the road services have limits.

I carry a torque wrench because getting caught up in the power wrench race results in bent rotors and broken studs. BTDT.
__________________
nothermark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2016, 08:13 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
geeman53's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 894
We've got a 20 ton bottle jack that does the job.
__________________
2016 sunseeker 2250slec
1988 Jayco p.u.,Coleman Plantation p.u.,1989 Jayco class c, Coachman TT,1995 Little Eddie fthwheel,2007 Heartland Sundance 2500 lS fthwheel
geeman53 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2016, 12:26 AM   #19
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by nothermark View Post
I carry the tools because I might not want to wait or might not be able to get help to where I am. All the road services have limits.

I carry a torque wrench because getting caught up in the power wrench race results in bent rotors and broken studs. BTDT.
I also finish tightening with a torque wrench as well, the power tool helps run the stabilizers up/down and help get lug nuts off and back on snug to use the t/w
__________________
Davidjeff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2016, 08:51 AM   #20
Senior Member
 
grumpy0374's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 817
In a perfect situation, or with aluminum rims, I could see using a torque wrench.
In reality, when was the last time you saw a tire company using a torque wrench to mount a set of steel rims, especially on a heavy duty E-450 with steel rims. They don't. I could just imagine them checking torque on 32 seperate lug nuts. Aside from that, they use air impact wrenches that are a heck of a lot more powerful than the electric wrench I carry.
Unless you really continue to crank down with an electric impact or a manual breaker bar your not going to break a stud or warp a steel rim.
Also, if I'm on the side of a roadway, changing a flat, last thing I'm going to worry about is checking the torque on the lug nuts.
On our two Subies or Mustang with alloy rims, yes, I do use a torque wrench.
Real world, on our Lexi, I have had my rims off a number of times, either to replace my shocks, mount new steel valve stems, and to rotate the 6 tires on my rig. Always used the impact wrench, and have never stripped or broken a lug nut or wheel stud.
Grumpy
__________________

__________________
Steve & Cheryl + Charlie & Casey, our furry kids.

2012 Forrest River Lexington 283ts
Toad, 2013 Subaru XV Crosstrek
Camping trips this year so far...8
Days camping...75
grumpy0374 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
class c, tire

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:23 AM.