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Old 10-03-2016, 08:29 PM   #1
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Changing Class C Tire

I have three kids and really like to be prepared. We have roadside assistance but would think that I could change a tire if needed. The spare is hanging underneath the rear on our 3170DS Sunseeker, I think it weights 14,500. Has anyone ever changed a flat on the road on one of these or something similar? I have two scissor jacks that I could use but have not checked into limits on those.

Thanks!
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Old 10-03-2016, 08:53 PM   #2
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I have three kids and really like to be prepared. We have roadside assistance but would think that I could change a tire if needed. The spare is hanging underneath the rear on our 3170DS Sunseeker, I think it weights 14,500. Has anyone ever changed a flat on the road on one of these or something similar? I have two scissor jacks that I could use but have not checked into limits on those.

Thanks!
Scissor jacks AREN'T going to cut it, look into a eight ton bottle jack if you want to lift it. Just make sure you chock the wheels if you do.
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Old 10-04-2016, 02:07 AM   #3
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I speak from personal experience and a bit of knowledge....
Get a bottle jack. A good heavy duty 20 ton bottle jack. An 8, 10, 12 ton won't cut it. A 20 ton will lift the front or rear with very little effort on your part. Tried the little ones...save your money and just get a 20 ton from the git go.
As for a lug wrench...forget the manual type bust your back rip your shoulders out type. Get a good electric 1/2 inch drive impact wrench. If your at home or a campground you just use the electric pedestal. If your on the road, just kick your generator on for power.
I have a Lowes Kobalt 1/2 inch drive corded impact wrench. Has enough power to take off and tighten the lug nuts, 350 ft lbs. Or, Lowes has a 24 volt cordless 1/2 drive impact wrench with enough "ooomph" to get the job done.
I also carry a small Sears air compressor, Airboss, that has enough power/pressure to do large tires right. Never did like the wimpy little 12 volt compressors.
I have used my equipment for maintaince on my class c, but have also used it on the road, twice, to help others with flats, who had a spare, but no proper tools.
Proper bottle jack, Harbor Freight 20 ton, can be had for under 35 bucks.
1/2 inch drive impact wrench, Lowes, 130 bucks
Decent small 115 volt air compressor can be had for under 100 bucks.
And now your set.
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Old 10-04-2016, 07:23 AM   #4
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Having already own a set of Ryobi 18+ tools I ordered one of these from Home Depot with free shipping, ( beats Amazon price)
Ryobi ONE+ 18-Volt 1/2 in. Cordless 3-Speed Impact Wrench (Tool-Only)-P261 - The Home Depot

The nice thing is it has 3 speeds and 300 lbs torque, it does the lug nuts and I use it for the scissor jacks as well. If you have to buy a battery buy the larger extended battery as well.
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Old 10-04-2016, 07:47 AM   #5
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Davidjeff, I think you may be a bit disappointed in the Ryobi with only 300 ft lbs of torque. The Kobalt corded has 350 ft lbs, and does an adaquate job. Dewalt also has a 350 ft lb corded wrench. And the Kobalt 24 volt battery 1/2 inch has around 600 ft lb rating. I'm not saying they are the best, just the most powerful, and its better to get the most powerful from the start, rather than spend money on something that may or may not be adaquate.
300 ft lb may or may not do a proper job of taking the lug nuts off and then back on. Hope I'm wrong, but it may not have the power needed to do a proper job.
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Old 10-04-2016, 12:18 PM   #6
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A problem with jacking the E450 is the twin I-beam front suspension. There's no good place to put the jack. I made an adapter from a pipe cap and piece of pipe to fit the lifting pin on the axle.

A previous poster is correct. My 12 ton jack strains to lift one side of the rear axle, which should be less than 3 tons. The ratings on those Chinese jacks are a joke.

I'd suggest carrying a stout jack stand to support the axle while the wheel is off, along with some boards or plywood to keep the jack and jack stand from sinking if you are not on pavement.
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Old 10-04-2016, 01:47 PM   #7
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I posted a few days ago on a thread about the difficulty I had last wknd. When I got a rear flat tire (nail) with my Solera; Sprinter chassis and spare tire under the rear. Both the tow truck driver who put the spare on( it was after hours and tire shops closed)?and also the tire shop the following day had a h*ll of a time getting the spare off and the next day, putting it back underneath. It took these pros about 75 or more minutes to figure it out and complete their jobs. I was told by the tire shop tech that this rear spare was the most complicated to assemble that he had seen. Their shop is on the busy hwy 395 travelers route. There is no way that I could have done it myself!!
I'm curious have others with the Sprinter chassus had thus problem? Is the rear tire undercarriage the same design for all Foresters??
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Old 10-04-2016, 01:59 PM   #8
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Davidjeff, I think you may be a bit disappointed in the Ryobi with only 300 ft lbs of torque. The Kobalt corded has 350 ft lbs, and does an adaquate job. Dewalt also has a 350 ft lb corded wrench. And the Kobalt 24 volt battery 1/2 inch has around 600 ft lb rating. I'm not saying they are the best, just the most powerful, and its better to get the most powerful from the start, rather than spend money on something that may or may not be adaquate.
300 ft lb may or may not do a proper job of taking the lug nuts off and then back on. Hope I'm wrong, but it may not have the power needed to do a proper job.
Grumpy
So far it has performed well, I have used it on rusty lugs that. Had not been removed and after tightening finished with a torque wrench and tested to see if it would tighten further, it did.. I was skeptical but it appears to work fine...there are cordless that go up to 700 ft lbs but are $700 which would be overkill and expensive. Thanks for the tip though!!!
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Old 10-04-2016, 02:29 PM   #9
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Changing tire class.

I can't remember what my jack can lift but it would get the wheels up on my 39' 5er and and I know my leveling jacks will be the first thing I will use and yes I do know that is not what they are for except when I have a flat
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Old 10-04-2016, 04:25 PM   #10
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Tire change-class C

20 ton bottle jack, breaker bar and wheel chocks. If it's a rear, try to get to a rest area or pull-off. If a front goes down, get as far off as possible. I wouldn't go lighter than a 20 ton jack. Electric impact is a good idea. I had to change one on I-95 in Virginia. Not difficult, but be careful.
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