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Old 01-25-2018, 12:43 AM   #1
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Lost a Tire - Lucky?

En-route to Quartzsite, after 2000 miles, including some very remote parts of New Mexico & Arizona, and just after a really mountainous section of road, we lost a rear tire at 65 mph. Lots of noise and tire chunks out the rear but we got stopped with no problem. Was an inside tire and doesn’t appear to be any damage.

Lucky? Well it happened in Phoenix and in mid-afternoon! Lots of tire store options. After calling around I found six new Michelins like the original equipment. 3 hrs and a dent to the wallet and we were on the road again.

42,000 miles on the original Michelin tires so not too bad I suppose. Had fought a leaking valve stem (cheap original equipment) for some time on this tire. While I watched it closely, it had some miles under pressure.

Arrived Quartzsite around 9pm, found a spot in the desert and will check out the RV show tomorrow.

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Old 01-25-2018, 04:59 AM   #2
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Wow! Glad to hear that you’re ok. Your story is further confirmation of the importance of a TPMS system. I got my TST 507 color system shortly after getting my camper, and will be watching it closely as we take our first out of area trip in February.
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Old 01-25-2018, 08:10 AM   #3
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Might want to check the wear bars on the tires every now and then too.
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Old 01-25-2018, 09:26 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by marinerjoe View Post
Wow! Glad to hear that you’re ok. Your story is further confirmation of the importance of a TPMS system. I got my TST 507 color system shortly after getting my camper, and will be watching it closely as we take our first out of area trip in February.


Yes I consider TPMS essential. After struggling to determine why the tire was leaking I got the TST 507 flow thru system. Works great tho in this case, it just went to zero immediately. Wear bars were still good on tires too.
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Old 01-25-2018, 02:57 PM   #5
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Another item to check at least annually on your tires is the manufacture date. over 5 years time to replace. For RVs which sit much of the year this is even more important as they don't wear our before they age out. There are many post on lots of sites about this subject.
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Old 01-25-2018, 06:22 PM   #6
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Michelin zippering?

Your tires look like they threw the whole tread off. I always assumed that the treads I see on the road are bad retreads from truck trailers, but it appears that this is not the only source of thrown treads.

Note that Michelin has documented a "zipper" condition on their motorhome tires. It consists of a circumferential crack on the sidewall just where it meets the tread. It could be the start of a delamination of the whole tread, which is what you seem to have.

You might look this up on the Michelin website. It might result in a warranty claim.

The only good way to protect against such a problem is by inspecting the tire regularly, which is not easy to do with an inside dual, especially since the zipper starts on part of the tire only and doesn't start on the full circumference. I wouldn't have any confidence at all that a TPMS would catch such a problem.

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Old 01-25-2018, 07:17 PM   #7
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Exploding Tires

Boy, do I know what that is like.

Check out this one..

What Do You Do When The Wheels Fall Off?
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Old 01-25-2018, 08:24 PM   #8
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Not just retreads from truck trailers but truck drivers using the companies trailer brakes to stop their whole rig to save their personal tractor brakes which leads to rapid tire wear.
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Old 01-26-2018, 06:50 PM   #9
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Just a question for those with a TPMS system. What pressure increase do you see running down the road. My Goodyear Endurance Tires are set to 80 psi cold. With ambient temps of 67* today they were at 89 psi. I cant imagine what a 90* day will bring?
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Old 01-26-2018, 07:13 PM   #10
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Coming home from Quartzsite two weeks ago, had my tires set to 50 psi and they went to 60psi on the road. My alarm went off on my TPMS, scared the crap out of me because it had never gone off before. I had to lower two of the tires to get it to shut up. Never had a tire gain psi like that before that I knew of until the TPMS.
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Old 01-26-2018, 07:40 PM   #11
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I track a couple of different cars and tire inflation talk can get quite deep around the track. The following is a short cut and paste from the Tire Rack website that might me helpful. They have a lot more info on their site.
The rule of thumb is for every 10° Fahrenheit change in air temperature, tire pressures will change about 2% (up with higher temperatures and down with lower). This means that light-duty, standard-pressure tires (typically inflated to 30-50 psi) used in applications on cars, vans and light trucks will change by about 1 psi; where heavy-duty, high-pressure tires (typically inflated to 80-100 psi) used in applications on recreational vehicles, busses and trucks will change by about 2 psi. The above came from the tire rack website. I track a couple of different cars and tire inflation talk can get quite deep
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Old 01-26-2018, 08:17 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lundy View Post
Coming home from Quartzsite two weeks ago, had my tires set to 50 psi and they went to 60psi on the road. My alarm went off on my TPMS, scared the crap out of me because it had never gone off before. I had to lower two of the tires to get it to shut up. Never had a tire gain psi like that before that I knew of until the TPMS.
Lowering the pressure usually makes things worse. A soft tire heats up faster than a fully inflated tire.

Driving on typical mid-temp days a tire will increase by about 4-5 PSI. This is typical. If the TPMS goes off with an over-pressure warning, it may be that the tire was under-inflated to start with. If the alarm does go off, check the temperature of that tire. If it is NOT hot, then the TPMS alarm is quite probably a false one. Also, it may be that the monitor max may be set a little too low.

If you stay below the max PSI as stipulated on the tire itself, there should be no reason to worry.

The other thing to consider is that TPMS devices can be temperamental and are unreliable. Use them as a guide, don't trust your life to them.
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Old 02-01-2018, 10:25 AM   #13
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TST TPMS

What TPMS do you run? TST TPMS is pretty reliable, comes with the repeater, and does not typically throw false alarms. On TST high pressure setting should be set 20% above, and low pressure 10% below what you fill the tire to. Temp is pre-set to alarm at 158 degrees. The new wide screen color display actually spells out the alerts across the bottom of the display with audible and flashing light rather than an icon.

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Old 02-02-2018, 10:21 AM   #14
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Lost a Tire - Lucky?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mbenson1234 View Post
What TPMS do you run? TST TPMS is pretty reliable, comes with the repeater, and does not typically throw false alarms. On TST high pressure setting should be set 20% above, and low pressure 10% below what you fill the tire to. Temp is pre-set to alarm at 158 degrees. The new wide screen color display actually spells out the alerts across the bottom of the display with audible and flashing light rather than an icon.



Thanks,

Mike Benson

TST TPMS

210-420-0132


Mike

I have the TST 507 flow thru monochrome TPMS and it worked perfectly. I believe this tire was damaged prior to the install of my TPMS due to a leaking valve stem. I bought the TPMS in part because of the intermittent leak. Being able to monitor the tires helped me catch low pressure quickly and ultimately identify the leaking valve stem extension.

It was great to meet you at Quartzsite and I appreciate your support here on the forum. As I mentioned I appreciate TST’s “no questions asked” replacement of my one broken sensor. Great customer service!

FYI I did get the new batteries installed with no problems.

Thanks Again!
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Old 02-03-2018, 12:00 AM   #15
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Tst tpms

Thank you Sir! Please feel free to contact me anytime.

Have a Great Weekend, and Safe Travels!

Thanks,
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wandering View Post
Mike

I have the TST 507 flow thru monochrome TPMS and it worked perfectly. I believe this tire was damaged prior to the install of my TPMS due to a leaking valve stem. I bought the TPMS in part because of the intermittent leak. Being able to monitor the tires helped me catch low pressure quickly and ultimately identify the leaking valve stem extension.

It was great to meet you at Quartzsite and I appreciate your support here on the forum. As I mentioned I appreciate TST’s “no questions asked” replacement of my one broken sensor. Great customer service!

FYI I did get the new batteries installed with no problems.

Thanks Again!
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Old 02-03-2018, 01:23 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Murbella7 View Post
Lowering the pressure usually makes things worse. A soft tire heats up faster than a fully inflated tire.

Driving on typical mid-temp days a tire will increase by about 4-5 PSI. This is typical. If the TPMS goes off with an over-pressure warning, it may be that the tire was under-inflated to start with. If the alarm does go off, check the temperature of that tire. If it is NOT hot, then the TPMS alarm is quite probably a false one. Also, it may be that the monitor max may be set a little too low.

If you stay below the max PSI as stipulated on the tire itself, there should be no reason to worry.

The other thing to consider is that TPMS devices can be temperamental and are unreliable. Use them as a guide, don't trust your life to them.
Tires cold. Should one fill to the max psi of tire before heading off OR plan on the tire pressure rising 5 psi once driving so only fill to say 45 psi if max psi on the tire is 51?
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Old 02-03-2018, 06:26 AM   #17
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If you look on the tire it will say "cold tire pressure" do not deflate a hot tire. So if tire says 50 psi cold at XXX weight, and your at XXX weight set to 50psi- it may go to 52-55 hot that is normal.

With out the tps you would not know what your hot pressure is, all manufactures say to set pressure cold.
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Old 02-03-2018, 07:29 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbenson1234 View Post
What TPMS do you run? TST TPMS is pretty reliable, comes with the repeater, and does not typically throw false alarms. On TST high pressure setting should be set 20% above, and low pressure 10% below what you fill the tire to. Temp is pre-set to alarm at 158 degrees. The new wide screen color display actually spells out the alerts across the bottom of the display with audible and flashing light rather than an icon.



Thanks,

Mike Benson

TST TPMS

210-420-0132


And as a note if you use the 20% above to be extra safe it may go off and scare the DW

Will be using the middle of the 120 - 130% for high alarm this year. Good news is we had the alarm work perfectly and didn’t go more than couple pounds over that so needs tweaked just a bit.
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Old 02-03-2018, 07:35 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by tbarb View Post
Just a question for those with a TPMS system. What pressure increase do you see running down the road. My Goodyear Endurance Tires are set to 80 psi cold. With ambient temps of 67* today they were at 89 psi. I cant imagine what a 90* day will bring?


Not uncommon. As I noted above had it happen as well. From set to 75 and alarm at 90. Long trip / hot day last year they ended up around 92 max.

New tires going on this year but will use the 125% for high just in case.
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Old 02-06-2018, 10:11 PM   #20
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X2 about letting air out of a hot tire to quiet the TPMS. Don't do it.

Better to acknowledge the alarm, check/adjust cold tire pressure next morning and adjust the alarm setting a little higher.
At 20% above cold pressure, mine have come close on the sunny side during the summer but never over.

I have more alarms on the low side on cold mornings with alarm set at 10% below cold but I don't add air.

One thing I have never understood is tire manufacturers giving you a cold max pressure but at what ambient temperature?
When I first adjusted all of my cold tire pressures it was around 75 degrees, early morning, no sun on tires. Any significant change in ambient temperature can raise or lower my early morning cold pressures by 3 to 5 psi so ambient temperature is a factor.
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