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Old 03-08-2016, 07:51 AM   #11
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Our 2012 Mirada also has the headlight problem- do they think MH owners never need to drive after dark or what? It appears they made to attempt to aim them at the factory.
As for the extenders it seems FR has a knack for selecting substandard goods. I believe ours were metal and in 10,000 miles were failing.
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Old 03-08-2016, 08:27 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by rottnmom View Post
Our 2012 Mirada also has the headlight problem- do they think MH owners never need to drive after dark or what? It appears they made to attempt to aim them at the factory.
As for the extenders it seems FR has a knack for selecting substandard goods. I believe ours were metal and in 10,000 miles were failing.
We have had Class As and Class Cs in the '70s that never had valve extension issues. The manufacturer's mindset for ANY material goods seems to be, if it works and it is functional, cheapen it to add a few cents to the bottom line. It keeps the customers coming. It also helps other endeavors such as after market products, to ambulance chasers, to morticions in the automotive industry. Sad to say.
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Old 03-08-2016, 08:49 AM   #13
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My Chevy chassis Class-C came with braided metal hose extenders on the inner dual tires.

TPMS will prevent many issues by giving the driver advance warning of air leaks.

As a tire engineer I have to say IMO I see no meaningful benefit to the dual tire inflation balancing equipment. I would suggest the money is better spent toward a TPMS. Your inflation balancer will only allow one tire to transfer some air to a tire with a puncture before the air transfer stops. You can still end up with a flat and failed tire and the tire that was 100% overloaded also had some of its air bleed off to the failed tire which increases the probability of the non-punctured tore also being damaged.

I have a few posts on my blog on both hose extenders and on inflation balancers.
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Old 03-08-2016, 11:18 AM   #14
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Not a tire expert by any means, but I have to agree with Tireman9. The TPMS is the better choice. It would be better to have one flat and bring it to the side with one overloaded tire, than to deal with a double flat or double tire failure.

I just read the article on RVTireSafety and found it interesting. Two years ago, I was preparing for a cross country travel pulling a tandem axle cargo trailer. I always check tire pressure on all of the TV and trailer tires, including the spares and the air bags. I also make it a point to inspect each of the tires surfaces. This particular time I noted what appeared to be a zipper failure on the inner side of one trailer tire. The tire has always had air pressure to specs. The tire had excellent tread and may have been two years old. Frustrated that I had a bad tire, but elated that I found it before is cause a serious problem. It was replaced with a new tire and rim before starting out. That tire may have lasted until getting on the Interstate, but it would surely have failed early during our journey. There is too much a risk to not take time and effort to visually check each tire and all of the surfaces before a trip.

On the road, the first thing I do at a service station or other stop is to check each tire for inflation and the hubs for excessive bearing heat. Before staring out for the day, I do a walk-around inspection.
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Old 03-21-2016, 08:58 PM   #15
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Metal valve extension o rings

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Originally Posted by AncientMariner View Post
I am not sure what models FR (or maybe Ford or the chassis stretcher) has installed the PLASTIC valve extensions on but my 2016 2801 (purchased in December, built August 2015) HAD them.

A couple of weeks ago I was unable to check the air in one of my rear duals. Took the RV to a truck repair shop this past Friday to have them look at the problem. The PLASTIC valve extension was cracked and by the time I got to the shop the tire was flat, fortunately no damage to tire. They did not have valves or extensions that would work.

This morning I was checking the air before leaving tomorrow for a few days and the other PLASTIC extension broke. Fortunately, there is a TA truck stop with tire service not far from my house. Bought 2 6" METAL extensions which work well enough once I removed the wheel simulators.

When I return next week, I plan on ordering Alcoa wheels (so I can use a Cross fire tire equalizer system) and METAL stems etc.

Once again, shame on FR for using PLASTIC parts that are CRITICAL to safety and life.

PLEASE, PLEASE check your valve stem extensions if PLASTIC (has black tips) replace them ASAP.

I have never seen PLASTIC extensions before and if you google valve extensions you will not find PLASTIC ones. I have to wonder if the $2 saved is worth the damage or harm to my life those PLASTIC parts could cause.

Since I am a stock holder as well, I will be sending a report of this to the CEO as well as Warren Buffet (I am stock holder) as well as the Feds, These are DANGEROUS!!!!

I can't believe I am the only one this has happened to. If only one broke, maybe I'd have shrugged it off, but 2 breaking says there is a problem.

Paul
I recently noticed my left front tire was at 57 PSI (Notified by my Tire Minder TPS system). After checking for nails, etc., and going back to the tire shop the second time, it was discovered the small o ring in the female portion of the valve extension was broken in two. After replacement, tire holds air properly. BTW, without the TPS, I probably would not have caught it, and probably lost the tire eventually.

Happy Trails, Forrest
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Old 03-21-2016, 09:19 PM   #16
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I have a 2016 FR3 and it didn't have any tire extensions from the factory. Which didn't surprise me as I was not expecting there to be any. I installed steel braided extensions and a TPMS on all wheels. The fact that there is no spare and you can observe the pressures at anytime helps with the stress level. In a perfect world we would get all the top of the line bells and whistles on our RV's while doing the best to beat down the price of the rig.
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Old 03-21-2016, 10:07 PM   #17
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Like you said TPMS is a must. Just today I added them to my toad. However, watch out for those braided extensions. My GT 364 came with them. Second trip in the MH cost me four tires! Inside right rear went flat, blew out and took the adjacent tire with it. Had them changed right on the interstate. On the way home, the same two blew again. Turns out tire repair guy didn't install a new valve stem which is what caused me to fork over almost $2,000 for the four tires and labor by the it was all over. (The braided valve stems had flopped around enough to rub a hole in them.) The first thing I did when I got home was pay to have stainless steel stems installed. Of course, if I had the TPMS at the time, all this could have been avoided. Bottom line: TPMS and high quality valve stems are a must.
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Old 03-22-2016, 11:06 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Vince and Charlette View Post
Like you said TPMS is a must. Just today I added them to my toad. However, watch out for those braided extensions. My GT 364 came with them. Second trip in the MH cost me four tires! Inside right rear went flat, blew out and took the adjacent tire with it. Had them changed right on the interstate. On the way home, the same two blew again. Turns out tire repair guy didn't install a new valve stem which is what caused me to fork over almost $2,000 for the four tires and labor by the it was all over. (The braided valve stems had flopped around enough to rub a hole in them.) The first thing I did when I got home was pay to have stainless steel stems installed. Of course, if I had the TPMS at the time, all this could have been avoided. Bottom line: TPMS and high quality valve stems are a must.
What part of the steel braided hose failed? I ran my first set about 40k with no problems. Have 5k on new RV with 2nd set of hoses. Again zero problems.
If properly installed the extension hoses are not suppose to move around at all. Sounds like the installation of the extensions was at fault not the hoses.
Of course I also have been running TPMS since 2007. Received one warning of puncture so the system has paid for itself 3 times over.
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Old 03-23-2016, 01:11 AM   #19
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Speaking of TPMS, I'm interested in buying an after market product flow-through system for my 2401W. Forum members have mentioned the TST and Tire Minder systems. Are there other good systems I should consider? What seems to be the favored brand among forum readers? I'm already sold on steel or stainless braided extensions.
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Old 03-23-2016, 01:44 AM   #20
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I have a 2016 2401W on a 2015 Mercedes chassis. I couldn't check my air pressure because my chuck wouldn't depress the stems. I removed both outer rears and took off all 4 of the extenders. The inside rears were straight plastic and the outside were curved steel. None of them worked.I can check air on inside and outside now. I have a long air chuck that angles that I can push on the insides and pull to check the outers. The fronts are normal.I installed braided steel extenders on my last motorhome. Still may do it to this one so I can have a valve cap on the inside duals.
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